The U.S. Capitol is pictured on July 27, 2017 in Washington, DC.
PHOTO: Zach Gibson/Getty Images
The U.S. Capitol is pictured on July 27, 2017 in Washington, DC.
Now playing
00:56
What a government shutdown means for you
Sen. Bernie Sanders AC360 intv 02262021
PHOTO: CNN via Cisco Webex
Sen. Bernie Sanders AC360 intv 02262021
Now playing
03:54
Sanders on what happens with proposed minimum wage increase now
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 17: The U.S. Capitol dome is seen beyond a security fence on January 17, 2021 in Washington, DC. After last week
PHOTO: Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 17: The U.S. Capitol dome is seen beyond a security fence on January 17, 2021 in Washington, DC. After last week's riots at the U.S. Capitol Building, the FBI has warned of additional threats in the nation's capital and in all 50 states. According to reports, as many as 25,000 National Guard soldiers will be guarding the city as preparations are made for the inauguration of Joe Biden as the 46th U.S. President. (Photo by Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:33
This is what's in the $1.9 trillion coronavirus package
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
02:24
Acosta corrects CPAC organizer: Trump did lose the election
Now playing
01:23
See what happened when CPAC organizers asked crowd to wear masks
Now playing
02:00
Hear Tapper's 'uncomfortable question' for Biden
Now playing
01:10
Rand Paul slams transgender health nominee over puberty suppression
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
02:39
Republicans push new restrictive election bills in 43 states
van jones minimum wage
van jones minimum wage
Now playing
02:44
Van Jones: This is a make or break issue for Democrats
US President Joe Biden speaks about the 50 million doses of the Covid-19 vaccine shot administered in the US during an event commemorating the milestone in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building in Washington, DC, February 25, 2021. (Photo by SAUL LOEB / AFP) (Photo by SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images)
PHOTO: Saul Loeb/AFP/etty Images
US President Joe Biden speaks about the 50 million doses of the Covid-19 vaccine shot administered in the US during an event commemorating the milestone in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building in Washington, DC, February 25, 2021. (Photo by SAUL LOEB / AFP) (Photo by SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
02:28
Axelrod explains the message Biden is sending with strike
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 13: Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) walks from his office to the Senate Chamber for the fifth day of former President Donald Trump
PHOTO: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 13: Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) walks from his office to the Senate Chamber for the fifth day of former President Donald Trump's impeachment trial at the U.S. Capitol on February 13, 2021 in Washington, DC. House impeachment managers asked the senate Saturday for the ability to question witnesses as part of the trial. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:07
McConnell says he'd support Trump as GOP nominee
The Pentagon, the headquarters of the US Department of Defense, located in Arlington County, across the Potomac River from Washington, DC is seen from the air January 24, 2017.  / AFP PHOTO / Daniel SLIM        (Photo credit should read DANIEL SLIM/AFP via Getty Images)
PHOTO: Daniel Slim/Getty Images
The Pentagon, the headquarters of the US Department of Defense, located in Arlington County, across the Potomac River from Washington, DC is seen from the air January 24, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / Daniel SLIM (Photo credit should read DANIEL SLIM/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
05:24
US carries out airstrikes on Iran-backed militia groups
The exterior of the U.S. Capitol building is seen at sunrise on February 8, 2021 in Washington, DC. The Senate is scheduled to begin the second impeachment trial of former U.S. President Donald J. Trump on February 9.
PHOTO: Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images
The exterior of the U.S. Capitol building is seen at sunrise on February 8, 2021 in Washington, DC. The Senate is scheduled to begin the second impeachment trial of former U.S. President Donald J. Trump on February 9.
Now playing
01:57
Senate parliamentarian rules against minimum wage increase in relief bill
Now playing
03:56
Marjorie Taylor Greene's challenger explains decision to run
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
03:44
Acting US Capitol Police chief explains 'operational challenges' from January 6 riot
Rep. Marie Newman (D-IL) speaks with CNN
PHOTO: CNN
Rep. Marie Newman (D-IL) speaks with CNN's Alisyn Camerota.
Now playing
07:17
Lawmaker reacts to Rep. Taylor Greene's tweet on her transgender daughter
(CNN) —  

President Donald Trump signed a short-term funding bill on Thursday to avert a government shutdown hours before funding for the federal government would have run out, according to a White House official.

The move allows lawmakers and Trump to work for another month to come up with a deal on funding the government. The deadline to avoid another government shutdown is now December 20.

Earlier on Thursday, the Senate passed the short-term funding bill by a vote of 74-20. The House had passed the bill earlier in the week.

As of Wednesday night, Senate Republican leaders were still working to relieve objections on their side of the aisle to components of the month-long continuing resolution to keep the government operating past the deadline when funding expires.

The holdup forced Senate leadership to abandon efforts to have a vote on the bill late Wednesday, according to a Senate Democratic leadership aide. An agreement to hold a vote on Thursday was later reached.

“Nothing is easy,” Sen. John Thune of South Dakota, the GOP Whip said on Wednesday, before adding that he was hopeful concerns about the bill would resolve as the deadline approaches Thursday and the threat of a shutdown becomes more real.

The push to keep the government funded comes as the House is in the midst of contentious and high-profile public impeachment inquiry hearings as part of an investigation into Trump by House Democrats that has led to an escalation of partisan tensions on Capitol Hill.

Against the backdrop of the impeachment inquiry, lawmakers have not yet reached bipartisan agreement on the 12 regular annual appropriations bills needed to fund the government. The passage of another stop-gap measure will allow for more time to negotiate.

Congress already passed a short-term funding extension earlier in the year – at the end of September – that set up the impending funding deadline this week.

A dispute over funding for a wall at the US-Mexico border triggered a partial government shutdown last year that extended into the start of the new, 116th Congress with Democrats refusing to sign off on the President’s demand for his signature campaign promise. That shutdown broke the record for the longest government shutdown in US history.

House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer told reporters earlier in the week, “the wall, I think, is the major impediment” to getting funding issues resolved. Hoyer argued that other spending bills are “being held hostage essentially” as a result.

Ahead of the House’s passage of its stop-gap bill, Hoyer said, “I hope the Senate will quickly pass it and the President will sign it.”

This story has been updated with additional developments Thursday.