Now playing
04:46
The legal consequences of identifying a whistleblower
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
01:26
Sen. Joe Manchin explains why he wanted changes to relief bill
Now playing
02:29
MS gov. encourages residents to wear masks despite dropping mandate
Now playing
01:21
Lawmaker fires back at Tucker Carlson's QAnon spin
Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) asks a question at a hearing of the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee on September 23, 2020 in Washington, DC.
PHOTO: Alex Edelman/Pool/Getty Images
Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) asks a question at a hearing of the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee on September 23, 2020 in Washington, DC.
Now playing
01:40
Trump plans to campaign against Sen. Murkowski in 2022
Biden 03062021
PHOTO: CNN
Biden 03062021
Now playing
02:28
'Help is on the way': Biden speaks after Senate passes relief plan
Now playing
03:04
Schumer: Nobody said it would be easy, but it is done
01 senate stimulus bill 210306
PHOTO: Senate TV
01 senate stimulus bill 210306
Now playing
01:47
Senate passes Biden's $1.9 trillion Covid-19 relief bill
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 05: Sen. John Cornyn (R) (R-TX) talks with Sen. Joe Manchin (D-WV) while walking to the U.S. Senate chamber for a vote March 05, 2021 in Washington, DC. The Senate continues to debate the latest COVID-19 relief bill.  (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Win McNamee/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 05: Sen. John Cornyn (R) (R-TX) talks with Sen. Joe Manchin (D-WV) while walking to the U.S. Senate chamber for a vote March 05, 2021 in Washington, DC. The Senate continues to debate the latest COVID-19 relief bill. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:54
Axelrod breaks down Manchin's surprising move
sinema
PHOTO: CNN
sinema
Now playing
01:50
Senator's move has many on the internet outraged
PHOTO: FBI
Now playing
02:58
Trump State Department official charged in Capitol riot
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 06: U.S. Sen. Paul Gosar (R-AZ) speaks on the floor of the House Chamber during a joint session of congress on January 06, 2021 in Washington, DC. Congress held a joint session today to ratify President-elect Joe Biden's 306-232 Electoral College win over President Donald Trump. A group of Republican senators said they would reject the Electoral College votes of several states unless Congress appointed a commission to audit the election results. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Drew Angerer/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 06: U.S. Sen. Paul Gosar (R-AZ) speaks on the floor of the House Chamber during a joint session of congress on January 06, 2021 in Washington, DC. Congress held a joint session today to ratify President-elect Joe Biden's 306-232 Electoral College win over President Donald Trump. A group of Republican senators said they would reject the Electoral College votes of several states unless Congress appointed a commission to audit the election results. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:19
This is what Rep. Gosar was posting days before Capitol riot
John King Magic Wall 0305
PHOTO: CNN
John King Magic Wall 0305
Now playing
02:17
President Biden sending a team to the US-Mexico border
Senior Advisor to the President Jared Kushner  attends a press conference on September 4, 2020, in the Brady Briefing Room of the White House in Washington, DC. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP) (Photo by BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images)
PHOTO: BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/AFP via Getty Images
Senior Advisor to the President Jared Kushner attends a press conference on September 4, 2020, in the Brady Briefing Room of the White House in Washington, DC. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP) (Photo by BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
02:50
Jared Kushner disappears from Trump's inner circle
Rep john garamendi 0305
PHOTO: CNN
Rep john garamendi 0305
Now playing
02:33
Rep. Garamendi: Any lawmaker involved in Capitol riots ought to be thrown out of Congress
Protesters gather at Lincoln Park to demand the Emancipation Memorial be taken down on June 23, 2020 in Washington, DC.
PHOTO: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images
Protesters gather at Lincoln Park to demand the Emancipation Memorial be taken down on June 23, 2020 in Washington, DC.
Now playing
03:01
Why some people want this Abraham Lincoln statue taken down
(CNN) —  

The FBI asked last month to interview the intelligence community whistleblower who first raised concerns about President Donald Trump’s interactions with Ukraine that ultimately sparked the House impeachment inquiry, a source familiar with the request confirmed to CNN.

In mid-October, the FBI’s Washington Field Office reached out to lawyers for the whistleblower and asked to interview the anonymous individual regarding the complaint filed with the Intelligence Community Inspector General in August, the source said.

The whistleblower’s legal team and FBI have been in contact regarding the request, which was made weeks after the Justice Department said it had decided not to pursue a campaign finance investigation based on the call, according to the source.

It is not clear why the FBI wants to interview the whistleblower, and the source did not elaborate on the communication between the two sides. Yahoo News first reported the interview request.

The Justice Department earlier this year reviewed the contents of the whistleblower complaint as a potential violation of campaign finance law by the President. Prosecutors from the Justice Department’s criminal division who did that review, including a number of career attorneys, decided against moving forward with a full investigation into potential campaign finance violations, senior Justice Department officials said in September.

However, a number of legal experts questioned whether there were other crimes or counterintelligence concerns raised in the complaint that could have potentially been ignored by the Justice Department.

The FBI also received a separate referral from the intelligence inspector general around the same time and didn’t open their own investigation.

Following guidelines for campaign finance violations, the FBI instead consulted with public corruption prosecutors at the Justice Department and deferred the case to the DOJ’s criminal division, senior department officials told CNN in September.

At the same time, prosecutors in Manhattan appear to be taking a wide-ranging look at the activities of the President’s personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, in Ukraine, and the whistleblower could have information that is relevant to that inquiry.

Two associates of Giuliani who were connected to the effort to dig up dirt in Ukraine on Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden were arrested last month and accused of funneling foreign money into US elections.

It’s also unclear what value the FBI sees in an interview with the whistleblower, given his or her complaint was in part based on secondhand information that has since been largely corroborated by national security officials who have spoken with the House impeachment investigators.

For a time, Republicans made bringing in the whistleblower for an interview one of their chief demands, though that call has since quieted as the impeachment inquiry moved on to a more advanced stage last week with the first set of public hearings.

A lawyer for the whistleblower has said that they are willing to submit written answers to questions.