Wreckage left at Polytechnic University shows make-shift bomb operations
CNN
Wreckage left at Polytechnic University shows make-shift bomb operations
Now playing
01:21
See the wreckage left at Hong Kong Polytechnic University
TOPSHOT - A picture taken on April 10, 2021, shows a view of a 3000 year old city, dubbed The Rise of Aten, dating to the reign of Amenhotep III, uncovered by the Egyptian mission near Luxor. - Archaeologists have uncovered the remains of an ancient city in the desert outside Luxor that they say is the "largest" ever found in Egypt and dates back to a golden age of the pharaohs 3,000 years ago. Famed Egyptologist Zahi Hawass announced the discovery of the "lost golden city", saying the site was uncovered near Luxor, home of the legendary Valley of the Kings. (Photo by Khaled DESOUKI / AFP) (Photo by KHALED DESOUKI/AFP via Getty Images)
KHALED DESOUKI/AFP/AFP via Getty Images
TOPSHOT - A picture taken on April 10, 2021, shows a view of a 3000 year old city, dubbed The Rise of Aten, dating to the reign of Amenhotep III, uncovered by the Egyptian mission near Luxor. - Archaeologists have uncovered the remains of an ancient city in the desert outside Luxor that they say is the "largest" ever found in Egypt and dates back to a golden age of the pharaohs 3,000 years ago. Famed Egyptologist Zahi Hawass announced the discovery of the "lost golden city", saying the site was uncovered near Luxor, home of the legendary Valley of the Kings. (Photo by Khaled DESOUKI / AFP) (Photo by KHALED DESOUKI/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
01:21
3,000-year-old city discovered and looks like it was 'left as if it were yesterday'
A worker is seen in front of a Christ statue being built in Encantado, Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil, on April 09, 2021. - The Christ the Protector statue under construction in Encantado will be larger than Rio de Janeiro's Christ the Redeemer and the third-largest in the world. (Photo by SILVIO AVILA / AFP) (Photo by SILVIO AVILA/AFP via Getty Images)
SILVIO AVILA/AFP/Getty Images
A worker is seen in front of a Christ statue being built in Encantado, Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil, on April 09, 2021. - The Christ the Protector statue under construction in Encantado will be larger than Rio de Janeiro's Christ the Redeemer and the third-largest in the world. (Photo by SILVIO AVILA / AFP) (Photo by SILVIO AVILA/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
01:21
New Christ statue in Brazil will be taller than Rio's
People view flowers left in front of the gate at Buckingham Palace in London, after the announcement of the death of Britain's Prince Philip, Friday, April 9, 2021. Buckingham Palace officials say Prince Philip, the husband of Queen Elizabeth II, has died. He was 99. Philip spent a month in hospital earlier this year before being released on March 16 to return to Windsor Castle.
Matt Dunham/AP
People view flowers left in front of the gate at Buckingham Palace in London, after the announcement of the death of Britain's Prince Philip, Friday, April 9, 2021. Buckingham Palace officials say Prince Philip, the husband of Queen Elizabeth II, has died. He was 99. Philip spent a month in hospital earlier this year before being released on March 16 to return to Windsor Castle.
Now playing
01:54
Tributes to Prince Philip pour in from around the world
Now playing
01:20
This Russian 'Lord of the Rings' adaptation is barely recognizable
Getty Images
Now playing
02:18
This airplane-shaped bag is selling for more than some actual planes
In this photograph taken on April 4, 2021, winner of Mrs. Sri Lanka 2020 Caroline Jurie (2-L) removes the crown of 2021 winner Pushpika de Silva (C) as she is disqualified by the jurie over the accusation of being divorced, at a beauty pageant for married women in Colombo. (Photo by - / AFP) (Photo by -/AFP via Getty Images)
AFP/Getty Images
In this photograph taken on April 4, 2021, winner of Mrs. Sri Lanka 2020 Caroline Jurie (2-L) removes the crown of 2021 winner Pushpika de Silva (C) as she is disqualified by the jurie over the accusation of being divorced, at a beauty pageant for married women in Colombo. (Photo by - / AFP) (Photo by -/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
01:52
Beauty pageant winner has crown snatched on stage
Reuters
Now playing
00:57
Video captures couple accidentally defacing expensive artwork
Now playing
05:27
Our video streaming habits impact the planet. Here's how
Now playing
01:30
5 ways to cut your plastic waste
Lumbermen work on the felling of eight 230 years old Sessile oak trees selected the week before to be used in the reconstruction of Notre-Dame de Paris Cathedral in the Foret de Berce, near Jupilles, on March 8, 2021. - A total of 1000 oaks are due to be hacked down by the end of March to rebuild the spire and roof of the cathedral, which was ravaged by fire in April 2019. Oaks from every region of France are being used to rebuild the cherished national monument, around half from state land and the rest from private donations. (Photo by JEAN-FRANCOIS MONIER / AFP) (Photo by JEAN-FRANCOIS MONIER/AFP via Getty Images)
Jean-Francois Monier/AFP/Getty Images
Lumbermen work on the felling of eight 230 years old Sessile oak trees selected the week before to be used in the reconstruction of Notre-Dame de Paris Cathedral in the Foret de Berce, near Jupilles, on March 8, 2021. - A total of 1000 oaks are due to be hacked down by the end of March to rebuild the spire and roof of the cathedral, which was ravaged by fire in April 2019. Oaks from every region of France are being used to rebuild the cherished national monument, around half from state land and the rest from private donations. (Photo by JEAN-FRANCOIS MONIER / AFP) (Photo by JEAN-FRANCOIS MONIER/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
01:04
The ancient trees bringing Notre Dame back to life
ATLANTA, GA - MARCH 03: Demonstrators stand outside of the Georgia Capitol building, to oppose the HB 531 bill on March 3, 2021 in Atlanta, Georgia. HB 531 will add controversial voting restrictions to the state's upcoming elections including restricting ballot drop boxes, requiring an ID requirement for absentee voting and limiting weekend early voting days. The Georgia House passed the bill and will send it to the Senate. (Photo by Megan Varner/Getty Images)
Megan Varner/Getty Images
ATLANTA, GA - MARCH 03: Demonstrators stand outside of the Georgia Capitol building, to oppose the HB 531 bill on March 3, 2021 in Atlanta, Georgia. HB 531 will add controversial voting restrictions to the state's upcoming elections including restricting ballot drop boxes, requiring an ID requirement for absentee voting and limiting weekend early voting days. The Georgia House passed the bill and will send it to the Senate. (Photo by Megan Varner/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:24
Coca Cola, Delta Airlines strike back at Georgia voting laws
patagonia kristine tompkins spc intl_00001903.png
patagonia kristine tompkins spc intl_00001903.png
Now playing
04:14
Patagonia's former CEO uses profits to protect landscapes
screengrab belarus police abuse
BYPOL
screengrab belarus police abuse
Now playing
04:59
Leaked police video shows the brutality of this Kremlin-backed regime
syria down syndrome children center damon pkg vpx_00000127.png
syria down syndrome children center damon pkg vpx_00000127.png
Now playing
04:39
Center supports children with Down syndrome in Syria
Nigeria climate change Eco champions feminist recycling spc_00115810.png
Nigeria climate change Eco champions feminist recycling spc_00115810.png
Now playing
23:06
Meet the women fighting climate change in Nigeria
(CNN) —  

The United States Senate unanimously passed a bill Tuesday that would require an annual review of the special treatment Hong Kong receives under US law following almost six months of unrest in the Asian financial hub.

The vote will be seen as boost for Hong Kong’s pro-democracy protesters, and a challenge to the Chinese government at a time of strained US-China relations, marked by a protracted trade war and geopolitical jostling.

The US government treats semi-autonomous Hong Kong, which has its own legal and political systems, differently from the Chinese mainland when it comes to trade and export controls.

The Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act – if it becomes law – will demand greater scrutiny of the city’s special status.

The bill also lays out a process for the President to impose sanctions and travel restrictions on those who are found to be knowingly responsible for threatened or carried out arbitrary detention, torture, forced confession of any individual in Hong Kong, or other violations of internationally recognized human rights in the former British colony.

Under the bill, the President can also impose sanctions on those who violate the 1997 Sino-British Joint Declaration – the agreement under which Britain handed Hong Kong back to China, and which sets the terms of the city’s autonomy. For months, protesters have accused China of infringing on the agreement by encroaching on Hong Kong’s protected freedoms.

The democracy bill has received broad bipartisan support and will now go to the House of Representatives, which passed a slightly different version of the bill last month. Then, it will head to the White House for President Donald Trump to review.

The vote was met with triumph in the Senate but anger and condemnation from China. In a statement, the Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs said the bill “neglects facts and truth, applies double standards and blatantly interferes in Hong Kong affairs and China’s other internal affairs.”

It also claimed that the issue at hand was not about democracy, but about stopping the “chaos” wreaked by “violent criminals.”

“China will have to take strong countermeasures to defend our national sovereignty, security and development interests if the US insists on making the wrong decisions,” the statement said, urging the US to “stop interfering.”

A separate statement from the Hong Kong government stressed that the city’s constitution safeguarded human rights and freedom, and that the Senate bill would “harm the relations and common interests between Hong Kong and the US.”

Meanwhile, many Congress members voiced their support for the bill and for the Hong Kong protesters. Sen. Chuck Schumer of New York, the top Democrat in the Senate, called the unanimous vote “a resounding message to the Chinese Communist Party and President Xi that the United States stands with the democratic protesters in Hong Kong.”

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, who has been more tight-lipped on Hong Kong, said on Tuesday that the US was watching the escalating violence in the city “closely,” and urged a peaceful resolution to the crisis.

There is one notable voice missing – Trump has largely refrained from entering into the fray as he works through stalled trade talks with China.

In June, as the protests kicked off, Trump promised Chinese President Xi Jinping in a phone call that the US would remain quiet on the protests while trade talks continued, according to sources familiar with the call.

Trump’s pledge is a dramatic departure from decades of US support for human rights in China – and is all the more striking as Congress has overwhelmingly sided with the protesters.

The bill could also complicate the trade talks if it places pressure on the White House to sanction China for its role and actions in the protests.

The turmoil in Hong Kong began as peaceful mass marches against a now-withdrawn China extradition bill. Protesters feared Beijing would use the bill to extract Hong Kongers for political reasons to face justice in mainland China’s opaque legal system.

As the stand-off with the government stretched on, peaceful mass marches increasingly descended into violence – and the movement quickly expanded to include demands for an independent inquiry into alleged police brutality and for universal suffrage.

Violence on both sides has steadily ramped up over the past few months. It escalated dramatically in the past two weeks, with the death of 22-year-old student near a protest and this week’s siege at Hong Kong Polytechnic University.

A small group of protesters is still barricaded inside the university, and police have surrounded the campus for days, arresting those who come out.

Haley Byrd contributed reporting.