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(CNN London) —  

Marie Kondo rose to fame by urging people to rid their homes of items that don’t “spark joy.” Now, she’s recommending products that do just that, at least for her.

The star of the Netflix (NFLX) series “Tidying Up with Marie Kondo” has launched an online shop on her website, KonMari.com, which carries products that “spark joy for Marie.”

There are more than 100 products for sale including a Shiatsu Stick ($12) handcrafted by Japanese woodworkers and a pair of leather slippers ($206) handmade in Tokyo.

The shop, which only ships to the United States, is organized across seven categories: aromatherapy, bath, books, cooking and kitchen, décor and living, tabletop and entertaining, and tidying and organization.

The opening of the online shop on Monday was first reported by the Wall Street Journal. Representatives for Kondo did not immediately respond to questions from CNN Business.

The most expensive item for sale is a $275 brass kitchen utensil holder designed by Japan’s Oji Masanori. There’s also a linen Kimono robe for $115, an oil diffuser for $119 and a candle by Brooklyn-based Bellocq for $86.

The cheapest product is a ceramic chopstick rest for $8 (the chopsticks themselves cost $10). Other items for sale include serving bowls, dinner plates, glasses and pitchers.

In an interview with the Journal, Kondo said she is not encouraging “over-purchasing anything.”

“What’s most important to me is that you surround yourself with items that spark joy. If the bowl that you’re using currently sparks joy for you, I don’t encourage replacing it at all,” she told the newspaper.

Her plan is to eventually include video footage of the items in the online store. For instance, Kondo told the Journal she wants to feature a video of her conducting a tea ceremony using the products and explaining how they create a calming effect.

Kondo began her tidying consulting business as a 19-year old student in Tokyo. She is author of the bestselling book, “The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up.”

Yet she is best known for the Netflix series, which sparked a global wave of house cleaning (and binge watching) earlier this year.