Now playing
01:47
Here's how Airbnb went from air mattresses to rental empire
Accused $50 billion Ponzi scheme swindler Bernard Madoff exits federal court March 10, 2009 in New York City. Madoff was attending a hearing on his legal representation and is due back in court Thursday.  (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
Mario Tama/Getty Images
Accused $50 billion Ponzi scheme swindler Bernard Madoff exits federal court March 10, 2009 in New York City. Madoff was attending a hearing on his legal representation and is due back in court Thursday. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
Now playing
03:11
Bernie Madoff, infamous Ponzi schemer, dead at 82
Now playing
05:18
Coinbase CFO: We're an on-ramp to the crypto economy
A man checks vine buds during the burning of anti-frost candles in the Luneau-Papin wine vineyard in Le Landreau, near Nantes, western France, on April 12, 2021, as temperatures fall below zero degrees celsius.
Sebastien Salom-Gomis/AFP/Getty Images
A man checks vine buds during the burning of anti-frost candles in the Luneau-Papin wine vineyard in Le Landreau, near Nantes, western France, on April 12, 2021, as temperatures fall below zero degrees celsius.
Now playing
01:37
See how French winemakers are trying to save their crops from frost
SUEZ, EGYPT - MARCH 29: The container ship 'Ever Given' is refloated, unblocking the Suez Canal on March 29, 2021 in Suez, Egypt. This morning the container ship came partly unstuck from the shoreline, where it ran aground in the canal last Tuesday, and later resumed its course shortly after 3pm local time. The Suez Canal is one of the world's busiest shipping lanes and the blockage had created a backlog of vessels at either end, raising concerns over the impact on global shipping and supply chains. (Photo by Mahmoud Khaled/Getty Images)
Mahmoud Khaled/Getty Images
SUEZ, EGYPT - MARCH 29: The container ship 'Ever Given' is refloated, unblocking the Suez Canal on March 29, 2021 in Suez, Egypt. This morning the container ship came partly unstuck from the shoreline, where it ran aground in the canal last Tuesday, and later resumed its course shortly after 3pm local time. The Suez Canal is one of the world's busiest shipping lanes and the blockage had created a backlog of vessels at either end, raising concerns over the impact on global shipping and supply chains. (Photo by Mahmoud Khaled/Getty Images)
Now playing
00:57
Egypt seizes Ever Given ship, asks for $900M in compensation
CNN
Now playing
03:06
Hear doctor's message for people with J&J vaccine concerns
Barbers from King's Cutz give haircuts indoors while observing COVID-19 safety restrictions on March 13, 2021 in Los Angeles, California.
Mario Tama/Getty Images
Barbers from King's Cutz give haircuts indoors while observing COVID-19 safety restrictions on March 13, 2021 in Los Angeles, California.
Now playing
01:43
US consumer prices increased in March
Now playing
03:21
Teachers under pandemic stress are quitting: I didn't feel safe
Domino's autonomous vehicle will deliver your pizza
Domino's
Domino's autonomous vehicle will deliver your pizza
Now playing
01:12
Watch this robot deliver a Domino's pizza
Now playing
01:27
See the first community of 3D-printed homes
Now playing
04:22
Levi's CEO has message for Mitch McConnell
Elon Musk's Neuralink says this monkey is playing Pong with its mind
From Neuralink/Youtube
Elon Musk's Neuralink says this monkey is playing Pong with its mind
Now playing
01:41
Elon Musk's company says this monkey is playing Pong with his mind
CNN
Now playing
02:36
The truth behind Covid-19 vaccines for sale on the dark web
Heinz ketchup packets are shown in New York on Monday, August 22, 2005. H.J. Heinz Co., the world's biggest ketchup maker, said first-quarter profit fell 19 percent on expenses to cut jobs and sell businesses.  (Photo by Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg/Getty Images
Heinz ketchup packets are shown in New York on Monday, August 22, 2005. H.J. Heinz Co., the world's biggest ketchup maker, said first-quarter profit fell 19 percent on expenses to cut jobs and sell businesses. (Photo by Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
Now playing
01:53
Restaurants face a nationwide ketchup packet shortage
CNN
Now playing
03:53
Norwegian Cruise Line CEO to CDC: We want to be treated fairly
Getty Images
Now playing
02:18
This airplane-shaped bag is selling for more than some actual planes
(CNN Business) —  

Airbnb and the International Olympic Committee announced a new partnership Monday that will expand the availability of housing in host cities and could reel in the ballooning costs of hosting the sport spectacle.

The deal is “economically empowering, socially inclusive and environmentally sustainable,” the IOC and Airbnb said in a joint statement.

The deal means that some Airbnb housing will be made available for visitors and workers. The new housing options could reduce the need to build new hotels. The IOC confirmed to CNN Business that the Olympic Village, where competing athletes stay, won’t be replaced with Airbnb housing.

Olympic host cities have to plan, pay for and construct massive infrastructure projects that costs billions of dollars — much of it with taxpayer money. Thousands of hotel rooms must be built to house athletes and tourists. Once the event is over, cities complain about the infrastructure that goes unused. And the promised economic returns rarely come to fruition.

The deal begins at next year’s summer games in Tokyo and covers five summer and winter games through 2028 in some of the world’s top tourist cities, including Paris, Milan and Los Angeles. Financial terms weren’t disclosed.

Airbnb also becomes a global partner, meaning the brand will be featured along with the world’s top most recognizable including Visa, Coca-Cola and Alibaba. The visibility will give Airbnb a boost ahead of its upcoming IPO that could happen in 2020.

The move could also help polish Airbnb’s image. Several cities around the world have been battling the short-term housing company for “overtourism,” i.e. the number of tourists outnumber the amount of locals and make living unaffordable.

For example, Barcelona approved new regulations that would curb hotel construction in the downtown area and put a cap on private home rentals in 2017. Other cities, like Amsterdam, London, Paris and Jersey City, have followed. Airbnb has fought back and imposed rental limits and said it has worked with local governments on new home-sharing rules.

The company has introduced a program called “One Host, One Home” to stop individuals from listing and promoting multiple properties on the platform in some cities.