LOS ANGELES, CA - OCTOBER 09:  Taylor Swift attends the 2018 American Music Awards at Microsoft Theater on October 9, 2018 in Los Angeles, California.  (Photo by Axelle/Bauer-Griffin/FilmMagic)
PHOTO: Axelle/Bauer-Griffin/FilmMagic/GettyImages
LOS ANGELES, CA - OCTOBER 09: Taylor Swift attends the 2018 American Music Awards at Microsoft Theater on October 9, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Axelle/Bauer-Griffin/FilmMagic)
Now playing
01:49
Look back at Taylor Swift's most influential moments
jill biden kelly clarkson divorce advice orig mg_00001210.png
PHOTO: NBC / The Kelly Clarkson Show
jill biden kelly clarkson divorce advice orig mg_00001210.png
Now playing
01:12
Jill Biden opens up about divorce on Kelly Clarkson show
PHOTO: 'GMA' / ABC
Now playing
01:56
Britney Spears' dad Jamie speaks out about conservatorship via lawyer on 'GMA'
NEW YORK, NY - JULY 01:  Lady Gaga seen leaving her hotel on July 1, 2019 in New York City.  (Photo by James Devaney/GC Images)
PHOTO: James Devaney/GC Images/GC Images
NEW YORK, NY - JULY 01: Lady Gaga seen leaving her hotel on July 1, 2019 in New York City. (Photo by James Devaney/GC Images)
Now playing
02:57
Lady Gaga's dog walker shot and dogs stolen
robot dog
PHOTO: spotsrampage.com
robot dog
Now playing
02:22
Paintball gun mounted on robot dog
PHOTO: Newport Coastal Adventure
Now playing
00:58
Dolphin 'stampede' caught on camera
PHOTO: NBC
Now playing
01:46
'SNL' gives public figures a chance to repent
Now playing
02:21
Fans awed by Dolly Parton's humble response to a statue
Singer/songwriter Demi Lovato attends the 2018 Billboard Music Awards 2018 at the MGM Grand Resort International on May 20, 2018, in Las Vegas, Nevada (Photo by LISA O
PHOTO: LISA O'CONNOR/AFP/Getty Images
Singer/songwriter Demi Lovato attends the 2018 Billboard Music Awards 2018 at the MGM Grand Resort International on May 20, 2018, in Las Vegas, Nevada (Photo by LISA O'CONNOR / AFP) (Photo credit should read LISA O'CONNOR/AFP/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:47
A look back at Demi Lovato's career
PHOTO: Walt Disney Studios/YouTube
Now playing
02:23
Disney's 'Cruella' goes up in flames in new trailer
PHOTO: EarthCam
Now playing
01:02
See Mardi Gras 2021 versus 2020
PHOTO: Twitter/@Adam Sandler
Now playing
01:06
See Adam Sandler's iconic swing on 25th anniversary of 'Happy Gilmore'
CATANIA, ITALY - FEBRUARY 18, 2021 - Mount Etna erupts in Sicily sending plumes of ash and spewing lava into air - PHOTOGRAPH BY Marco Restivo / Barcroft Studios / Future Publishing (Photo credit should read Marco Restivo/Barcroft Media via Getty Images)
PHOTO: Barcroft Media/Barcroft Media/Barcroft Media via Getty Images
CATANIA, ITALY - FEBRUARY 18, 2021 - Mount Etna erupts in Sicily sending plumes of ash and spewing lava into air - PHOTOGRAPH BY Marco Restivo / Barcroft Studios / Future Publishing (Photo credit should read Marco Restivo/Barcroft Media via Getty Images)
Now playing
01:04
See mesmerizing footage of Mount Etna spewing lava
Ben Affleck, Gal Gadot and director Zack Snyder on the set of
PHOTO: Warner Bros.
Ben Affleck, Gal Gadot and director Zack Snyder on the set of 'Justice League.'
Now playing
01:02
See the new trailer for the 'Justice League' director's cut
PHOTO: Twitter/@misanharriman
Now playing
01:15
Inside Harry and Meghan's life after royalty
PHOTO: 'Extra TV' / Warner Bros. Television
Now playing
01:59
'Bachelor' host steps aside after comments about racism
(CNN) —  

Losing the rights to her early music catalog continues to cause trouble, trouble, trouble for singer Taylor Swift.

Swift on Thursday claimed an ongoing dispute with her former music label has presented a new roadblock as she is being told she cannot perform many songs from her past at the upcoming American Music Awards or use it in a forthcoming Netflix documentary about her life, which has been in production for several years.

Swift’s disclosure of this latest rights issue comes months after she spoke publicly about her displeasure with a deal that saw music manager Scooter Braun take control of her old catalog after he acquired her former music label, Big Machine Label Group.

“I’ve been planning to perform a medley of my hits throughout the decade on the show. Scott Borchetta and Scooter Braun have now said that I’m not allowed to perform my old songs on television because they claim that would be re-recording my music before I’m allowed to next year,” Swift wrote.

In July, Swift called it her “worst case scenario,” upon learning that her music catalog had been sold to a company owned by Braun.

Braun’s Ithaca Holdings acquired Big Machine Label Group from founder Borchetta in late June. The deal was worth roughtly $300 million, according Billboard.

“Scott Bocchetta told my team that they’ll allow me to use my music only if I do these things: If I agree to not re-record copycat versions of my songs next year (which is something I’m both legally allowed to do and looking forward to) and also told my team that I need to stop talking about him and Scooter Braun,” Swift wrote. “The message being sent to me is very clear. Basically, be a good little girl and shut up. Or you’ll be punished.”

In a statement to CNN, Big Machine Records denied that the company has prevented Swift from performing at the AMAs or blocked the Netflix special.

“Taylor, the narrative you have created does not exist. All we ask is to have a direct and honest conversation. When that happens, you will see there is nothing but respect, kindness and support waiting for you on the other side,” the statement read in part. “We share the collective goal of giving your fans the entertainment they both want and deserve.”

Scooter Braun
PHOTO: Getty Images
Scooter Braun's company holds the rights to Swift's first six albums.

Swift said she thinks sharing her experience “could change the awareness level for other artists and potentially help them avoid a similar fate.”

“This is WRONG. Neither of these men had a hand in the writing of those songs. They did nothing to create the relationship I have with my fans. So this is where I’m asking for your help,” she wrote. “Please let Scott Borchetta and Scooter Braun know how you feel about this.”

Swift had been signed to Big Machine from her 2006 self-titled debut album through 2017’s “Reputation,” before moving to Universal Music Group.

The sale prevents Swift from owning the first six albums in her catalog. She told CBS Sunday Morning of her plans to re-record her earlier music.

The public dispute that has followed since the sale has both sides finding their defenders.

In an Instagram post, Justin Bieber, who is managed by Braun, appealed to Swift, saying, “I’m sure Scooter and i would love to talk to you and resolve any conflict, pain or or any feelings that need to be addressed.” But he also took issue with Swift making the issue public, saying doing so to “get people to hate on scooter isn’t fair.”

“What were you trying to accomplish by posting that blog? seems to me like it was to get sympathy u also knew that in posting that your fans would go and bully Scooter,” he wrote.

Braun’s wife, Yael Cohen, also came to his defense.

Meanwhile, singer Halsey, director Joseph Kahn and Iggy Azalea have shown themselves to be Team Taylor.

In her post on Thursday, Swift appealed to other artists managed by Braun “who I really believe care about other artists and their work.”

“Please ask them for help with this - I’m hoping that maybe they can talk some sense into the men who are exercising tyrannical control over someone who just wants to play the music she wrote,” she said. “I’m especially asking for help from The Carlyle Group, who put up money for the sale of my music to these two men.”

Braun also manages Ariana Grande and the Zac Brown band.

“I just want to be able to perform MY OWN music. That’s it. I’ve tried to work this out privately through my team but have not been able to resolve anything,” Swift added. “Right now my performance at the AMAs, the Netflix documentary and any other recorded events I am planning to play until November of 2020 are a question mark.”

CNN’s Chloe Melas and Marianne Garvey contributed to this report.