Photo Illustration: Getty Images / Loop / CNN
Now playing
03:50
How the world's biggest brands plan to end garbage
CNN
Now playing
02:32
McDonald's is putting cameras in dumpsters. Here's why
Now playing
03:53
Watch this drone swarm replant a burnt forest
Gary Apodaca/LAFD
Now playing
01:50
Watch the country's first firefighting robot in action
Now playing
03:36
Could this be the cure to our plastic problem?
BERLIN, GERMANY - AUGUST 15:  A mushroom belonging to the Russula genus (in German: Taeubling) grows in a forest near Schlachtensee Lake on August 15, 2011 in Berlin, Germany. The exceptionally rainy German summer has caused mushrooms of all types to flourish, much to the delight of mushroom gatherers.  (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
Sean Gallup/Getty Images Europe/Getty Images
BERLIN, GERMANY - AUGUST 15: A mushroom belonging to the Russula genus (in German: Taeubling) grows in a forest near Schlachtensee Lake on August 15, 2011 in Berlin, Germany. The exceptionally rainy German summer has caused mushrooms of all types to flourish, much to the delight of mushroom gatherers. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:35
Could mushrooms be the key to replacing plastic?
SCUNTHORPE, ENGLAND - OCTOBER 19:  The sun sets behind the Tata Steel processing plant at Scunthorpe which may make 1200 workers redundant on October 19, 2015 in Scunthorpe, England. Up to one in three workers at the Lincolnshire steel mill could lose their jobs alongside workers at other plants in Scotland. Tata Steel UK  is due to announce the Scunthorpe job losses this week.  (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
Christopher Furlong/Getty Images Europe/Getty Images
SCUNTHORPE, ENGLAND - OCTOBER 19: The sun sets behind the Tata Steel processing plant at Scunthorpe which may make 1200 workers redundant on October 19, 2015 in Scunthorpe, England. Up to one in three workers at the Lincolnshire steel mill could lose their jobs alongside workers at other plants in Scotland. Tata Steel UK is due to announce the Scunthorpe job losses this week. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:42
These bacteria turn industrial emissions into fuel
Beeflow
Beeflow
Now playing
01:43
Why this startup is making honeybees smarter
August 2019 - Makani's energy kite launches from a floating platform in the North Sea off the coast of Norway
Makani
August 2019 - Makani's energy kite launches from a floating platform in the North Sea off the coast of Norway
Now playing
02:01
These energy kites can go where wind turbines can't
Fraser, a healthy chocolate lab, is a participant in the Vaccination Against Canine Cancer Study.
CNN
Fraser, a healthy chocolate lab, is a participant in the Vaccination Against Canine Cancer Study.
Now playing
02:37
A vaccine against cancer? These dogs are the first patients
Alfredo Alcántara
Now playing
04:33
New York's secret weapon against big storms? Oysters
Now playing
04:58
From a drop of blood, this company can predict what your face looks like
Apeel Sciences
Now playing
03:39
The startup fighting mushy bananas and shriveled strawberries
Now playing
03:04
Could this giant floating pipe clean up 90% of ocean plastic?
Now playing
05:50
Is algae the food of the future?
(CNN Business) —  

Hyatt is the latest international hotel brand to ditch travel-sized toiletries from its rooms, following Holiday Inn-owner InterContinental Group and Marriott International.

Portable tubes of shampoo, conditioner and bath gel will be replaced with bulk-sized toiletries across Hyatt’s (H) global chain of 220,000 rooms beginning in June 2021. The changes will affect Hyatt’s (H) 900 hotels worldwide, encompassing 20 brands, including Park Hyatt, Hyatt Place and the Andaz.

“Plastic pollution is a global issue, and we hope our efforts will motivate guests, customers and, indeed, ourselves to think more critically about our use of plastic,” Mark Hoplamazian, president and CEO of Hyatt, said in a press release.

The new large-format bottles Hyatt Hotels will be replacing portable toiletries with.
Hyatt Hotels Corporation
The new large-format bottles Hyatt Hotels will be replacing portable toiletries with.

Hyatt is also placing a greater emphasis on encouraging customers to use reusable water bottles by making bottled water available only by request and increasing the number of fresh water stations in its lobbies.

The initiative is part of the hotel chain’s broader commitment to “reduce disposables and select environmentally preferable options whenever possible,” the company said. Hyatt removed plastic straws and drink picks in September 2018. It’s also part of the Clean the World program, which recycles and sanitizes soap and gives them to needy communities.

Pitching plastic

Businesses are facing disruption from climate change and customers are increasingly demanding that products and services are environmentally friendly. Cost-cutting is another reason why hotels are doing this because they can spend less on replacing the portable products.

Marriott (MAR) said in August it was ditching personal toiletries from its more than 1 million guest rooms beginning in December 2020. The chain, which also owns Ritz-Carlton and W Hotels, said it expects to reduce its plastic disposal by 30% annually.

IHG said in July that guests staying in the 843,000 rooms across its global hotel chain will find large-format toiletries beginning in 2021.

Hilton, which has more than 950,000 rooms globally, is likewise transitioning from single-use to bulk toiletries by next year. The hotel chain also told CNN Business that it has a number of other environmental initiatives in place, including being part of the Clean the World soap program and improving energy efficiency.