T-Mobile and Sprint Nextel cellular phone stores adjoin each other in Herald Square in New York on Tuesday, March 8, 2011. Sprint announced ti is cutting 2500 jobs, approximately 7 percent of its workers, and closing call centers in a $2.5 billion cost cutting endeavor. (Photo by Richard Levine/Corbis via Getty Images)
T-Mobile and Sprint Nextel cellular phone stores adjoin each other in Herald Square in New York on Tuesday, March 8, 2011. Sprint announced ti is cutting 2500 jobs, approximately 7 percent of its workers, and closing call centers in a $2.5 billion cost cutting endeavor. (Photo by Richard Levine/Corbis via Getty Images)
PHOTO: Richard Levine/Corbis via Getty Images
Now playing
01:02
T-Mobile's merger with Sprint gets thumbs up from DOJ
screengrab US social media
screengrab US social media
PHOTO: Getty Images
Now playing
04:35
Tech companies ban Trump, but not other problematic leaders
PHOTO: Samsung
Now playing
01:53
See Samsung's new Galaxy S21 lineup
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
02:47
Extremists and conspiracy theorists search for new platforms online
This illustration picture shows the social media website from Parler displayed on a computer screen in Arlington, Virginia on July 2, 2020. - Amid rising turmoil in social media, recently formed social network Parler is gaining with prominent political conservatives who claim their voices are being silenced by Silicon Valley giants. Parler, founded in Nevada in 2018, bills itself as an alternative to "ideological suppression" at other social networks. (Photo by Olivier Douliery/AFP/Getty Images)
This illustration picture shows the social media website from Parler displayed on a computer screen in Arlington, Virginia on July 2, 2020. - Amid rising turmoil in social media, recently formed social network Parler is gaining with prominent political conservatives who claim their voices are being silenced by Silicon Valley giants. Parler, founded in Nevada in 2018, bills itself as an alternative to "ideological suppression" at other social networks. (Photo by Olivier Douliery/AFP/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Olivier Douliery/AFP/Getty Images
Now playing
03:49
Parler sues Amazon in response to being deplatformed
PHOTO: Twitter
Now playing
02:39
Twitter permanently suspends Donald Trump from platform
Panasonic
Panasonic's Augmented Reality Heads-up Display
PHOTO: Panasonic USA
Now playing
01:06
This tech gives drivers directions on the road in front of them
PHOTO: LG Display
Now playing
01:10
See LG's transparent TV
PHOTO: Twitter/@gregdoesthings
Now playing
02:06
Internet gets creative with empty iPhone boxes
NEW YORK, NY - JUNE 3: The Google logo adorns the outside of their NYC office Google Building 8510 at 85 10th Ave on June 3, 2019 in New York City. Shares of Google parent company Alphabet were down over six percent on Monday, following news reports that the U.S. Department of Justice is preparing to launch an anti-trust investigation aimed at Google. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - JUNE 3: The Google logo adorns the outside of their NYC office Google Building 8510 at 85 10th Ave on June 3, 2019 in New York City. Shares of Google parent company Alphabet were down over six percent on Monday, following news reports that the U.S. Department of Justice is preparing to launch an anti-trust investigation aimed at Google. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Drew Angerer/Getty Images North America/Getty Images
Now playing
03:25
Google employee on unionizing: Google can't fire us all
Now playing
02:01
Watch 'deepfake' Queen deliver alternative Christmas speech
This photo taken on August 4, 2020 shows Prince, a member of the hacking group Red Hacker Alliance who refused to give his real name, using a website that monitors global cyberattacks on his computer at their office in Dongguan, China
This photo taken on August 4, 2020 shows Prince, a member of the hacking group Red Hacker Alliance who refused to give his real name, using a website that monitors global cyberattacks on his computer at their office in Dongguan, China's southern Guangdong province. - From a small, dingy office tucked away in an industrial city in southern China, one of China's last "volunteer hacker" groups maintains a final outpost in its patriotic hacking war. (Photo by NICOLAS ASFOURI / AFP) / TO GO WITH China-hacking-security,FOCUS by Laurie Chen / The erroneous mention[s] appearing in the metadata of this photo by NICOLAS ASFOURI has been modified in AFP systems in the following, we removed the HOLD HOLD HOLD in the main caption. Please immediately remove the erroneous mention[s] from all your online services and delete it (them) from your servers. If you have been authorized by AFP to distribute it (them) to third parties, please ensure that the same actions are carried out by them. Failure to promptly comply with these instructions will entail liability on your part for any continued or post notification usage. Therefore we thank you very much for all your attention and prompt action. We are sorry for the inconvenience this notification may cause and remain at your disposal for any further information you may require. (Photo by NICOLAS ASFOURI/AFP via Getty Images)
PHOTO: NICOLAS ASFOURI/AFP/AFP via Getty Images
Now playing
03:30
Russia claims cyberattack may be plot to hurt ties with Biden
Now playing
01:42
Watch father leave daughter dozens of surprise Ring messages
PHOTO: Photo Illustration: Kena Betancur/Getty Images
Now playing
04:50
Zoom's founder says he 'let down' customers. Here's why
Now playing
00:48
See Walmart's self-driving delivery trucks in action
Now playing
01:25
This robotaxi from Amazon's Zoox has no reverse function
(CNN Business) —  

T-Mobile and Sprint are hoping to complete their merger soon. But the man positioned to head that new company is in talks to lead another major undertaking: a rescue mission for WeWork.

T-Mobile (TMUS) CEO John Legere, who has been set to remain chief executive of the combined company that will result from its merger with Sprint (S), is one of a number of people in talks to take over the top job at WeWork parent We Co., a source familiar with the matter told CNN Business. The struggling office sharing startup has been searching for a new leader to bring stability after a botched IPO led to the ouster of co-founder and now-former CEO Adam Neumann. The talks were first reported by the Wall Street Journal.

If he does end up at We Co., Legere would be leaving T-Mobile at a crucial time. T-Mobile and Sprint are the third and fourth largest wireless carriers, and though their combination has been blessed by the FCC and the US Justice Department, 15 states and the District of Columbia are suing to block the deal over concerns about what the proposed $26 billion merger could mean for the marketplace.

The lawsuit by the state attorneys general is expected to go to trial next month. T-Mobile and Sprint have said they will not seek to close their merger unless the court rules in their favor, and have made a number of commitments about their services in an attempt to get opponents on board.

T-Mobile’s stock fell around 2.5% Monday afternoon following the news of Legere’s talks with WeWork.

The talks may point to the influence that Japanese holding company SoftBank (SFTBF), which owns a majority stake in Sprint, may have in the new combined wireless company. Under the merger deal, the new company will be controlled by T-Mobile parent Deutsche Telekom (DTEGF), while SoftBank (SFTBF) will own around a quarter of the merged entity.

SoftBank also owns the majority of WeWork, after bailing it out in the midst of fallout over Neumann, and has pumped billions of dollars into the company that it stands to lose if it can’t right the ship.

Legere is known for his success in turning around T-Mobile in recent years. He has transformed the company from a struggling carrier with below average coverage to the fastest growing network in the country. The merger with Sprint would make it a formidable competitor to larger wireless players Verizon and AT&T, which owns CNN.

Legere, like Neumann, also has a nontraditional leadership style. He’s a Twitter fanatic, has sparred with President Donald Trump and other executives and is almost always seen rocking T-Mobile magenta. Legere and Neumann also share similar hairstyles.

But Legere could bring the leadership chops to WeWork that Neumann lacked, according to Tim Hubbard, a professor of management at University of Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business.

“Hiring John Legere would serve as a signal to the market that the company wants to increase its legitimacy without losing its core, radical nature,” Hubbard said.

WeWork is currently being run by former co-president and CFO Artie Minson and former vice chairman Sebastian Gunningham, who were named co-CEOs after Neumann stepped down in September.

SoftBank declined to comment for this story, and T-Mobile did not immediately return a request for comment.

Sara Ashley O’Brien contributed to this report