PHOTO: Adriel Hampton/Twitter
Now playing
02:23
Facebook blocks California candidate's false ad
Chris, a Trump supporter, reacts to a fact check of a manipulated video shared by the Trump campaign.
Chris, a Trump supporter, reacts to a fact check of a manipulated video shared by the Trump campaign.
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
03:58
What Trump supporters see on their Facebook feeds
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
02:03
Watch this former exec compare Facebook to Big Tobacco
Screengrab Nick Clegg facebook
Screengrab Nick Clegg facebook
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
07:34
Facebook exec explains the company's US election actions
Now playing
05:15
Misleading videos shared by Republicans get millions of views
Now playing
02:24
Under questioning, Zuckerberg admits Instagram was a 'competitor'
Now playing
03:31
Congresswoman grills Facebook CEO on copying competitors
PHOTO: From Facebook
Now playing
02:40
Zuckerberg blasts Trump administration for worsening pandemic
Facebook co-founder, Chairman and CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before the House Energy and Commerce Committee in the Rayburn House Office Building on Capitol Hill April 11, 2018 in Washington, DC. This is the second day of testimony before Congress by Zuckerberg, 33, after it was reported that 87 million Facebook users had their personal information harvested by Cambridge Analytica, a British political consulting firm linked to the Trump campaign.  (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Facebook co-founder, Chairman and CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before the House Energy and Commerce Committee in the Rayburn House Office Building on Capitol Hill April 11, 2018 in Washington, DC. This is the second day of testimony before Congress by Zuckerberg, 33, after it was reported that 87 million Facebook users had their personal information harvested by Cambridge Analytica, a British political consulting firm linked to the Trump campaign. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
Now playing
03:33
Facebook meeting 'disappointing,' says ad boycott organizer
PHOTO: Shutterstock
Now playing
01:57
Facebook removes Trump ads 'for violating our policy against organized hate'
This picture taken on July 4, 2019 in Nantes, shows logos of the US online social media and social networking service, Facebook. (Photo by LOIC VENANCE / AFP)        (Photo credit should read LOIC VENANCE/AFP via Getty Images)
This picture taken on July 4, 2019 in Nantes, shows logos of the US online social media and social networking service, Facebook. (Photo by LOIC VENANCE / AFP) (Photo credit should read LOIC VENANCE/AFP via Getty Images)
PHOTO: LOIC VENANCE/AFP/AFP via Getty Images
Now playing
02:41
He quit Facebook over Zuckerberg's handling of Trump posts. Hear why
PHOTO: Glenn Chapman/AFP/Getty Images/CNN
Now playing
03:38
He says Facebook's Libra is the future. Lawmakers aren't so sure
PHOTO: YouTube/Financial Services Committee
Now playing
02:15
Zuckerberg struggles to explain whether Facebook fact checks political ads
Mark Zuckerberg remained silent after Congressman Barry Loudermilk compared him to President Trump.
Mark Zuckerberg remained silent after Congressman Barry Loudermilk compared him to President Trump.
Now playing
00:43
Watch Zuckerberg react when a lawmaker compares him to Trump
Facebook
Facebook's CEO Mark Zuckerberg delivers his speech during the VivaTech (Viva Technology) trade fair in Paris, on May 24, 2018. (Photo by GERARD JULIEN / AFP) (Photo credit should read GERARD JULIEN/AFP/Getty Images)
PHOTO: GERARD JULIEN/AFP/Getty Images
Now playing
03:21
This is how Facebook kills its competition
facebook zuckerberg origin business orig _00011530.jpg
facebook zuckerberg origin business orig _00011530.jpg
Now playing
01:47
It took Facebook 15 years to take over the world. Here's how
(CNN Business) —  

You’d be forgiven for thinking that the only tech platform that allows politicians to run false ads is Facebook.

The company has faced an onslaught of criticism from Congress, Democratic presidential candidates, the media, and even its own employees.

Twitter (TWTR) CEO Jack Dorsey was initially applauded last week when he announced his company would stop taking political ads entirely — likely a result of, and further contributing to, the battering Facebook was getting. But that enthusiasm soon turned to concern when people realized it could mean advocacy and activist groups might no longer be able to advertise on the platform.

But both Facebook (FB) and Twitter — for better or for worse — have taken a stand and have publicly explained and defended their policies.

Google (GOOG), on the other hand, has stayed largely silent and out of the spotlight — even as it too allows politicians to run ads containing false claims.

When President Donald Trump’s reelection campaign created the ad falsely accusing former Vice President Joe Biden of corruption for his role in Ukraine policy during the Obama administration that set off the current controversy over digital ads, Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube all ran it.

The Trump campaign spent somewhere between $100,000 and $200,000 promoting a YouTube video of the ad. The ad was seen between 10 and 30 million times, according to Google’s political ad database.

A YouTube spokesperson told CNN Business the ad did not break its rules.

“We don’t have special exceptions for political ads - all ads that run on our platform have to comply with our ads policies, and all political ads are included in our Transparency Report and Ads Library,” the YouTube spokesperson said.

The spokesperson pointed to Google Ads’ policies, which seemingly also apply to YouTube. A section of that policy reads, “We don’t want users to feel misled by ads, so we strive to ensure ads are clear and honest, and provide the information that users need to make informed decisions. We don’t allow ads or destinations that intend to deceive users by excluding relevant information or giving misleading information about products, services, or businesses.”

CNN Business asked the YouTube spokesperson multiple times to explain why the false Trump ad attacking Biden did not break those rules. The spokesperson did not provide an answer.

The Wall Street Journal reported Wednesday that Google was considering change to its policy. CNN Business has reached out to Google for comment.

Facebook, perhaps because of its perceived ubiquity, may continue to get the most scrutiny. The company is often used as a way to scrutinize issues in Silicon Valley that go far beyond them — or, in the view of some Facebook employees, as a scapegoat.

To some extent that is what has happened here. Facebook has, to coin a phrase, leaned in to this debate, with executives like Nick Clegg and even Mark Zuckerberg giving public speeches that have made the company a target. And it is the digital outlet on which the most ad dollars from presidential campaigns are spent. But that does not mean it is the only company that will have to address the concerns about this issue, and soon.