Cow Methane
Cow Methane
Now playing
01:40
This food could change a cow's contribution to the climate crisis
Now playing
02:26
Stelter: Right-wing media has shifted in a way I've never seen before
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 12:  Joe Scarborough attends the "The Right Path: From Ike To Reagan, How Republicans Once Mastered Politics - And Can Again" book event on November 12, 2013 in New York, United States.  (Photo by Rob Kim/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 12: Joe Scarborough attends the "The Right Path: From Ike To Reagan, How Republicans Once Mastered Politics - And Can Again" book event on November 12, 2013 in New York, United States. (Photo by Rob Kim/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Rob Kim/Getty Images
Now playing
01:22
Joe Scarborough drops f-bomb in on-air rant against rioters
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
02:55
Stelter: Notable that Fox News hasn't promoted this
PHOTO: Fox News
Now playing
02:07
Watch these Fox News hosts criticize holiday travel guidance
screengrab Martin Kenyon
screengrab Martin Kenyon
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
03:03
British man becomes internet sensation after interview with CNN
PHOTO: Photo Illustration: Jim Spellman/WireImage
Now playing
04:38
Bon Appetit had a culture problem. She wants to change that
PHOTO: Fox
Now playing
02:01
Tucker Carlson claims vaccine campaign 'feels false, because it is'
Now playing
08:37
Fox News targets Bill Gates after CNN interview
local news anchor unemployment help newsroom intv vpx _00001423.png
local news anchor unemployment help newsroom intv vpx _00001423.png
PHOTO: WRGB
Now playing
04:50
How a news anchor helped over 4,000 Americans this year
Now playing
01:52
Fox News' Geraldo Rivera spars over election fraud claims: 'Stop this!'
PHOTO: Fox News
Now playing
00:57
Watch President Trump's first on-camera interview since the election
PHOTO: Fox News
Now playing
05:31
Stelter: This was Fox News' biggest story last week
WILMINGTON, DELAWARE - NOVEMBER 07:  President-elect Joe Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris take the stage at the Chase Center to address the nation November 07, 2020 in Wilmington, Delaware. After four days of counting the high volume of mail-in ballots in key battleground states due to the coronavirus pandemic, the race was called for Biden after a contentious election battle against incumbent Republican President Donald Trump. (Photo by Andrew Harnik-Pool/Getty Images)
WILMINGTON, DELAWARE - NOVEMBER 07: President-elect Joe Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris take the stage at the Chase Center to address the nation November 07, 2020 in Wilmington, Delaware. After four days of counting the high volume of mail-in ballots in key battleground states due to the coronavirus pandemic, the race was called for Biden after a contentious election battle against incumbent Republican President Donald Trump. (Photo by Andrew Harnik-Pool/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Andrew Harnik/Pool/Getty Images
Now playing
01:44
Time magazine chooses Biden and Harris as 2020's Person of the Year
Now playing
02:32
CNN spoke to Trump supporters about election results. See what they had to say
(CNN Business) —  

Turn on the BBC America cable channel on any given Saturday from now on, and you’ll see natural history programs like “Blue Planet.”

The channel is adopting a new name, Wonderstruck, on Saturdays only, and “counter-programming the world with the world,” Sarah Barnett says.

Barnett, the president of both the AMC Networks Entertainment Group and AMC Studios, calls Wonderstruck a “mini-network” and likens it to Adult Swim, the network that takes over the Cartoon Network at night.

Wonderstruck is billed as a 24-hour dose of “wildlife and wonder.” Barnett told CNN Business that nature programming provides a “much yearned for sense of communal watching.” She argued that it’s also good for people’s “emotional health.”

PHOTO: BBC America

“As you and your viewers know better than anyone, the division, the atomization, the polarization in our world hasn’t gone away. In fact, it’s exacerbated,” she said.

The nature documentaries serve as a break from the news cycle.

It’s a clever marketing strategy from BBC America, which is a joint venture between the UK’s BBC and AMC Networks. The channel is the exclusive TV home of the “Planet Earth” collection in the US, and other series from BBC Studios’ Natural History Unit.

Other programmers are also seizing on the newfound potential of in the natural history content. Discovery is planning to launch a streaming service with nature shows and films. And Netflix is investing in similar programming.

These are the kinds of shows that can play passively in the background or be watched actively, Barnett observed.

“You can let it wash over you,” and “you can also learn a ton from this stuff. But I think that it’s content that doesn’t feel like broccoli,” she said. “It doesn’t feel like it’s good for you. It feels like absolute pleasure and it’s good for you.”

She also asserted that concerns about climate change and “our changing world” also have something to do with interest in natural history TV.

“I think that the general ways in which people are feeling so rocked by our changing world, so overtaken by the speed in which technology, politics, climate change, urbanization, you know, a host of other things – are confusing, unsettling, upsetting people in profound, conscious and unconscious ways,” she said. “There is proof, there is data around the fact that this kind of content makes you feel connected to something bigger.”

The BBC filmmakers who make much of the programming that will appear on Wonderstruck have an “implicit belief” that “you fall in love with the world and then you want to save the world,” Barnett said. The filmmakers’ front-seat view of “the fragility of our planet is certainly there.”

Wonderstruck will kick off on Saturday with a preview of “Seven Worlds, One Planet,” a forthcoming series narrated by David Attenborough.