PHOTO: AFP & Getty Images
Now playing
02:49
Sen. Graham is Trump's loyal ally. But it's complicated
US President Joe Biden speaks about the 50 million doses of the Covid-19 vaccine shot administered in the US during an event commemorating the milestone in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building in Washington, DC, February 25, 2021. (Photo by SAUL LOEB / AFP) (Photo by SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images)
PHOTO: Saul Loeb/AFP/etty Images
US President Joe Biden speaks about the 50 million doses of the Covid-19 vaccine shot administered in the US during an event commemorating the milestone in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building in Washington, DC, February 25, 2021. (Photo by SAUL LOEB / AFP) (Photo by SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
02:28
Axelrod explains the message Biden is sending with strike
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 13: Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) walks from his office to the Senate Chamber for the fifth day of former President Donald Trump
PHOTO: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 13: Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) walks from his office to the Senate Chamber for the fifth day of former President Donald Trump's impeachment trial at the U.S. Capitol on February 13, 2021 in Washington, DC. House impeachment managers asked the senate Saturday for the ability to question witnesses as part of the trial. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:07
McConnell says he'd support Trump as GOP nominee
The Pentagon, the headquarters of the US Department of Defense, located in Arlington County, across the Potomac River from Washington, DC is seen from the air January 24, 2017.  / AFP PHOTO / Daniel SLIM        (Photo credit should read DANIEL SLIM/AFP via Getty Images)
PHOTO: Daniel Slim/Getty Images
The Pentagon, the headquarters of the US Department of Defense, located in Arlington County, across the Potomac River from Washington, DC is seen from the air January 24, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / Daniel SLIM (Photo credit should read DANIEL SLIM/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
05:24
US carries out airstrikes on Iran-backed militia groups
The exterior of the U.S. Capitol building is seen at sunrise on February 8, 2021 in Washington, DC. The Senate is scheduled to begin the second impeachment trial of former U.S. President Donald J. Trump on February 9.
PHOTO: Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images
The exterior of the U.S. Capitol building is seen at sunrise on February 8, 2021 in Washington, DC. The Senate is scheduled to begin the second impeachment trial of former U.S. President Donald J. Trump on February 9.
Now playing
01:57
Senate parliamentarian rules against minimum wage increase in relief bill
Now playing
03:56
Marjorie Taylor Greene's challenger explains decision to run
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
03:44
Acting US Capitol Police chief explains 'operational challenges' from January 6 riot
Rep. Marie Newman (D-IL) speaks with CNN
PHOTO: CNN
Rep. Marie Newman (D-IL) speaks with CNN's Alisyn Camerota.
Now playing
07:17
Lawmaker reacts to Rep. Taylor Greene's tweet on her transgender daughter
Connolly
PHOTO: CNN
Connolly
Now playing
03:51
'I will not be lectured' on bipartisanship: Lawmaker fires back at Jim Jordan
US President Donald Trump speaks to the press from the South Lawn of the White House after announcing and initial deal with China in Washington, DC, prior to departing to Lake Charles, Louisiana to hold a campaign rally on October 11, 2019.
PHOTO: NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images
US President Donald Trump speaks to the press from the South Lawn of the White House after announcing and initial deal with China in Washington, DC, prior to departing to Lake Charles, Louisiana to hold a campaign rally on October 11, 2019.
Now playing
02:28
Romney says he's 'pretty sure' Trump will win 2024 nomination if he runs
Now playing
02:04
Senate moderates create obstacle for Biden's nominee
This picture taken 26 December 2011 shows the Pentagon building in Washington, DC.  The Pentagon, which is the headquarters of the United States Department of Defense (DOD), is the world
PHOTO: Staff/AFP/Getty Images
This picture taken 26 December 2011 shows the Pentagon building in Washington, DC. The Pentagon, which is the headquarters of the United States Department of Defense (DOD), is the world's largest office building by floor area, with about 6,500,000 sq ft (600,000 m2), of which 3,700,000 sq ft (340,000 m2) are used as offices. Approximately 23,000 military and civilian employees and about 3,000 non-defense support personnel work in the Pentagon. (Photo credit should read STAFF/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
04:30
Pentagon report gives insight on White supremacists in active military
Now playing
03:57
GOP senator continues to push riot conspiracy theory
Now playing
02:08
Cabinet secretary explains why he took on challenging role
Rep. Debra Haaland (D-NM), President Joe Biden
PHOTO: Leigh Vogel/Pool/Getty Images
Rep. Debra Haaland (D-NM), President Joe Biden's nominee for Secretary of the Interior, testifies during her confirmation hearing before the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resource, at the U.S. Capitol on February 24, 2021 in Washington, DC.
Now playing
00:59
'We need to work together': Haaland responds to question on blind loyalty
Now playing
01:35
Laughter follows awkward moment between GOP leaders
(CNN) —  

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham is introducing a resolution critical of the House impeachment process against President Donald Trump that calls on the House to hold a vote to initiate a formal inquiry.

The resolution, co-sponsored by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, argues that the House is “denying President Trump basic fairness and due process accorded every American.”

“The purpose of the resolution is to let the House know that the process you’re engaging in regarding the attempted impeachment of President Trump is out of bounds,” Graham said during a Thursday press conference, arguing that it is “a substantial deviation from what the House has done in the past regarding impeachment of other presidents.”

As House Democrats investigate the President’s contacts with Ukraine, congressional Republicans have turned their focus to attacking the process underway in conducting the inquiry.

In a statement in support of the resolution, McConnell said that the inquiry “is breaking critical precedents, denying the administration important rights that were afforded other presidents, and violating basic rules of due process.”

Congressional Republicans have escalated their attacks on the process as the President has called for a stronger defense.

On Wednesday, group of House Republicans stormed a closed-door deposition in secure House Intelligence Committee spaces to argue that the process taking place is not transparent.

The effort to storm the room came two days after Trump said that he thought Republicans “have to get tougher and fight.” Many of the Republicans engaged in the protest were at a White House meeting with Trump on Tuesday, and a person familiar with the matter told CNN that Trump had advance knowledge of the plans to enter the space.

Graham argued during his press conference that “instead of the Judiciary looking at a potential impeachable offense, they’ve created a process with the Intel committee that’s behind closed doors, doesn’t provide access to the President’s accuser, shuts Republicans out for all practical purposes and is an unworthy substitute for the way you need to do it.”

Democrats say that Republican complaints about the process are unwarranted. Republicans on the three committees — Intelligence, Foreign Affairs and Oversight — have equal time to question witnesses.

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff has said that the committee will release transcripts and hold public hearings, but said they are conducting the fact-finding part of the investigation, like a grand jury before a trial, that’s done behind closed doors.

And House Speaker Pelosi has dismissed calls for an impeachment vote from Trump and congressional Republicans as nothing more than a “Republican talking point.”

Graham has emerged as one of the most adamant defenders of the President on Capitol Hill amid the Ukraine controversy and the impeachment inquiry.

In the wake of charges from a whistleblower that the President tried to strong-arm the Ukrainian President to dig up dirt on former vice president and 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden, Graham has gone on the offensive, repeatedly defending Trump’s actions. There is no evidence of wrongdoing by either Joe or Hunter Biden.

“This seems to me like a political setup. It’s all hearsay,” Graham told CBS’ “Face the Nation” at the end of last month. “You can’t get a parking ticket conviction based on hearsay. The whistleblower didn’t hear the phone call. Who told the whistleblower about the phone call and everything else? Donald Trump is still an American. Every American deserves to confront their accuser. So this is a sham as far as I’m concerned.”

Graham discussed the President’s state of mind on Thursday, saying, “He would like the process to be exposed for being basically unfair. He keeps telling us he did nothing wrong.”

Graham argued “the phone call was OK with me,” referring to a publicly-released transcript of a call between Trump and the Ukrainian President.

But the senator added, “I don’t know what’s going to happen in terms of Ukraine … I’m not here to tell you that Donald Trump’s done nothing wrong. I’m not here to tell you anything other than that the way they’re going about it is really dangerous for the country and we need to change course while we can in the House.”

CNN’s Jeremy Herb and Ted Barrett contributed to this report.