exp Former Facebook advisor: 2020 could be "2016 on steroids"_00003001.jpg
exp Former Facebook advisor: 2020 could be "2016 on steroids"_00003001.jpg
Now playing
06:30
Former Facebook advisor: 2020 could be "2016 on steroids"
PHOTO: "The Late Late Show with James Corden" / Youtube
Now playing
01:37
See Prince Harry and James Corden tour LA on open-air bus
PHOTO: CBS
Now playing
02:23
What Tiger Woods said about the Masters just days ago
NEW YORK, NY - JULY 23: New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks during the daily media briefing at the Office of the Governor of the State of New York on July 23, 2020 in New York City. The Governor said the state liquor authority has suspended 27 bar and restaurant alcohol licenses for violations of social distancing rules as public officials try to keep the coronavirus outbreak under control. (Photo by Jeenah Moon/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Jeenah Moon/Getty Images
NEW YORK, NY - JULY 23: New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks during the daily media briefing at the Office of the Governor of the State of New York on July 23, 2020 in New York City. The Governor said the state liquor authority has suspended 27 bar and restaurant alcohol licenses for violations of social distancing rules as public officials try to keep the coronavirus outbreak under control. (Photo by Jeenah Moon/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:22
Gov. Cuomo attacks media amid nursing home scandal
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 15: MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell waits outside the West Wing of the White House before entering on January 15, 2021 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Drew Angerer/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 15: MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell waits outside the West Wing of the White House before entering on January 15, 2021 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
Now playing
00:39
MyPillow and its CEO Mike Lindell sued by Dominion
Now playing
03:52
Stelter: Power plants failed. Fox News blamed windmills
Radio talk show host and conservative commentator Rush Limbaugh speaks at "An Evenining With Rush Limbaugh" event May 3, 2007 in Novi, Michigan. The event was sponsored by WJR radio station as part of their 85th birthday celebration festivities. (Photo by Bill Pugliano/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Bill Pugliano/Getty Images
Radio talk show host and conservative commentator Rush Limbaugh speaks at "An Evenining With Rush Limbaugh" event May 3, 2007 in Novi, Michigan. The event was sponsored by WJR radio station as part of their 85th birthday celebration festivities. (Photo by Bill Pugliano/Getty Images)
Now playing
03:10
Rush Limbaugh dead at 70 after battle with cancer
Brooke
PHOTO: CNN
Brooke
Now playing
03:33
Brooke Baldwin announces she's leaving CNN
PHOTO: Getty Images/CNN
Now playing
04:04
Keilar calls out Fox News for misrepresenting Trump parade
White House deputy press secretary TJ Ducklo listens as press secretary Jen Psaki speaks during a press briefing at the White House, Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2021, in Washington. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
PHOTO: Patrick Semansky/AP
White House deputy press secretary TJ Ducklo listens as press secretary Jen Psaki speaks during a press briefing at the White House, Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2021, in Washington. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Now playing
01:37
White House deputy press secretary TJ Ducklo resigns
Lou Dobbs Tonight Stelter DNT 0208
PHOTO: Fox Business
Lou Dobbs Tonight Stelter DNT 0208
Now playing
02:29
Here's just how extreme Dobbs' rhetoric became before cancellation
President Donald Trump
PHOTO: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
President Donald Trump's lawyer and former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani talks to journalists outside the White House West Wing July 01, 2020 in Washington, DC. Giuliani did an on-camera interview with One America News Network's Chanel Rion before talking to other journalists about Vice President Joe Biden and the news that Russian intelligence may have paid Taliban operatives to kill U.S. troops in Afghanistan.
Now playing
02:51
Hear Giuliani's response to disclaimer running before his radio show
PHOTO: Getty Images
Now playing
03:44
Smartmatic sues Fox News, Trump allies over 'disinformation campaign'
Now playing
02:03
Watch Newsmax anchor walk off set during MyPillow CEO interview
Now playing
03:38
Right and wrong ways to cover Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene
Now playing
04:21
Stelter: Reducing a liar's reach is not the same as censorship
(CNN Business) —  

The biggest news outlets in Australia, normally fierce rivals, are uniting in support of press freedom with a campaign including blacked-out newspaper front pages and slots on prime time broadcasts.

The newspapers and networks are trying to “to highlight the constraints on media organizations under strict national security legislation,” Australia’s ABC network reported.

The news outlets have joined forces through a coalition known as the “Right to Know.” And the joint action has been designed to agitate readers into action.

Australia
PHOTO: Saeed Khan/AFP via Getty Images
Australia's leading newspapers blacked out front pages seen on a newsstand in Sydney on October 21, 2019.

Monday’s edition of the Herald Sun, part of the News Corp Australia Network, asked, “When government keeps the truth from you, what are they covering up?”

“The straw that broke the camel’s back were the raids on News Corp journalist Annika Smethurst (who now faces possible criminal charges, ironically because she reported the government was considering new powers to spy on all of us) and an unrelated raid on the ABC headquarters after a report detailing incidents of Australian special forces troops killing men and children in Afghanistan,” according to the Herald Sun.

Those two raids, back in June, stunned press freedom advocates and galvanized opposition to Australia’s national security laws.

On Sunday night, “the nation’s broadcasters began running campaigns on air” during their prime time lineups, “depicting redacted Freedom of Information requests and arguing the media cannot fulfill its duty in keeping the public informed if its work is being hampered,” the ABC network reported.

And on Monday, Australia’s biggest newspapers ran redacted front pages, with black eraser lines symbolically scrawled all over the day’s top stories.

The redacted front pages are a “united call for greater media freedom following a sustained attack on the rights of journalists to hold governments to account and report the truth to the Australian public,” the Australian Business Review said.

The newspaper called the blackout an “unprecedented act of protest against increasing restrictions on the freedom of the press.”

Images shared via social media showed rows of newspaper front pages — more than a dozen in total — with blacked out news.