HONG KONG, CHINA - OCTOBER 13: A pro-democracy protester attempts to break a tourist bus front windows in Mongkok district on October 13, 2019 in Hong Kong, China. Hong Kong's government invoked emergency powers last week to introduce an anti-mask law which bans people from wearing masks at public assemblies as the city remains on edge with the anti-government movement entering its fourth month. Protesters in Hong Kong continue to call for Chief Executive Carrie Lam to meet their remaining demands since the controversial extradition bill was withdrawn, which includes an independent inquiry into police brutality, the retraction of the word riot to describe the rallies, and genuine universal suffrage, as the territory faces a leadership crisis.
PHOTO: Anthony Kwan/Getty Images
HONG KONG, CHINA - OCTOBER 13: A pro-democracy protester attempts to break a tourist bus front windows in Mongkok district on October 13, 2019 in Hong Kong, China. Hong Kong's government invoked emergency powers last week to introduce an anti-mask law which bans people from wearing masks at public assemblies as the city remains on edge with the anti-government movement entering its fourth month. Protesters in Hong Kong continue to call for Chief Executive Carrie Lam to meet their remaining demands since the controversial extradition bill was withdrawn, which includes an independent inquiry into police brutality, the retraction of the word riot to describe the rallies, and genuine universal suffrage, as the territory faces a leadership crisis.
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HONG KONG, HONG KONG - JUNE 09:  Protesters march on a street during a rally against the extradition law proposal on June 9, 2019 in Hong Kong China. Hundreds of thousands of protesters marched in Hong Kong in Sunday against a controversial extradition bill that would allow suspected criminals to be sent to mainland China for trial.(Photo by Anthony Kwan/Getty Images)
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HONG KONG, HONG KONG - JUNE 09: Protesters march on a street during a rally against the extradition law proposal on June 9, 2019 in Hong Kong China. Hundreds of thousands of protesters marched in Hong Kong in Sunday against a controversial extradition bill that would allow suspected criminals to be sent to mainland China for trial.(Photo by Anthony Kwan/Getty Images)
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HONG KONG, CHINA - NOVEMBER 24: Barnabus Fung (2nd R) and Patrick Nip Tak-kuen (2nd L) empty a ballot box to count votes at a polling station on November 24, 2019 in Hong Kong, China. Hong Kong held its district council election on Sunday as anti-government protests continue into a sixth month, with demands for an independent inquiry into police brutality, the retraction of the word "riot" to describe the rallies, and genuine universal suffrage. (Photo by Billy H.C. Kwok/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Billy H.C. Kwok/Getty Images AsiaPac/Getty Images
HONG KONG, CHINA - NOVEMBER 24: Barnabus Fung (2nd R) and Patrick Nip Tak-kuen (2nd L) empty a ballot box to count votes at a polling station on November 24, 2019 in Hong Kong, China. Hong Kong held its district council election on Sunday as anti-government protests continue into a sixth month, with demands for an independent inquiry into police brutality, the retraction of the word "riot" to describe the rallies, and genuine universal suffrage. (Photo by Billy H.C. Kwok/Getty Images)
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A man walks past debris littering the entrance at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University campus in the Hung Hom district of Hong Kong on November 27, 2019, over a week after police surrounded the building while protesters were still barricaded inside. - Teams at one of Hong Kong's top universities picked through the chaotic aftermath of a violent occupation by protesters for a second day on November 27 as the school searches for elusive holdouts -- and a way forward for a devastated institution. (Photo by Anthony WALLACE / AFP) (Photo by ANTHONY WALLACE/AFP via Getty Images)
PHOTO: Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty
A man walks past debris littering the entrance at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University campus in the Hung Hom district of Hong Kong on November 27, 2019, over a week after police surrounded the building while protesters were still barricaded inside. - Teams at one of Hong Kong's top universities picked through the chaotic aftermath of a violent occupation by protesters for a second day on November 27 as the school searches for elusive holdouts -- and a way forward for a devastated institution. (Photo by Anthony WALLACE / AFP) (Photo by ANTHONY WALLACE/AFP via Getty Images)
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Police officers cordon off an area where pro-democracy protesters were shots by a policeman in Hong Kong on November 11, 2019. - A Hong Kong police officer shot at masked protesters -- hitting at least one in the torso -- during clashes broadcast live on Facebook, as the city's rush hour was interrupted by protests. (Photo by Anthony WALLACE / AFP) (Photo by ANTHONY WALLACE/AFP via Getty Images)
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Police officers cordon off an area where pro-democracy protesters were shots by a policeman in Hong Kong on November 11, 2019. - A Hong Kong police officer shot at masked protesters -- hitting at least one in the torso -- during clashes broadcast live on Facebook, as the city's rush hour was interrupted by protests. (Photo by Anthony WALLACE / AFP) (Photo by ANTHONY WALLACE/AFP via Getty Images)
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Pro-democracy demonstrators hold up their hands to symbolise their five demands during a protest against an expected government ban on protesters wearing face masks at Chater Garden in Hong Kong on October 4, 2019. - Hong Kong's government was expected to meet October 4 to discuss using a colonial-era emergency law to ban pro-democracy protesters from wearing face masks, in a move opponents said would be a turning point that tips the financial hub into authoritarianism. (Photo by Mohd RASFAN / AFP) (Photo by MOHD RASFAN/AFP via Getty Images)
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Pro-democracy demonstrators hold up their hands to symbolise their five demands during a protest against an expected government ban on protesters wearing face masks at Chater Garden in Hong Kong on October 4, 2019. - Hong Kong's government was expected to meet October 4 to discuss using a colonial-era emergency law to ban pro-democracy protesters from wearing face masks, in a move opponents said would be a turning point that tips the financial hub into authoritarianism. (Photo by Mohd RASFAN / AFP) (Photo by MOHD RASFAN/AFP via Getty Images)
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HONG KONG, CHINA - AUGUST 24:  A riot police fires rubber bullet at protesters during an anti-government rally in Kowloon Bay district on August 24, 2019 in Hong Kong, China. Pro-democracy protesters have continued rallies on the streets of Hong Kong against a controversial extradition bill since 9 June as the city plunged into crisis after waves of demonstrations and several violent clashes. Hong Kong's Chief Executive Carrie Lam apologized for introducing the bill and declared it "dead", however protesters have continued to draw large crowds with demands for Lam's resignation and completely withdraw the bill. (Photo by Anthony Kwan/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Anthony Kwan/Getty Images AsiaPac/Getty Images
HONG KONG, CHINA - AUGUST 24: A riot police fires rubber bullet at protesters during an anti-government rally in Kowloon Bay district on August 24, 2019 in Hong Kong, China. Pro-democracy protesters have continued rallies on the streets of Hong Kong against a controversial extradition bill since 9 June as the city plunged into crisis after waves of demonstrations and several violent clashes. Hong Kong's Chief Executive Carrie Lam apologized for introducing the bill and declared it "dead", however protesters have continued to draw large crowds with demands for Lam's resignation and completely withdraw the bill. (Photo by Anthony Kwan/Getty Images)
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PHOTO: Satellite image ©2019 Maxar Technologies
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Anti-extradition protesters move barricades on a street outside the Legislative Council Complex ahead of the annual flag raising ceremony of 22nd anniversary of the city's handover from Britain to China on July 1, 2019 in Hong Kong, China. Pro-democracy demonstrators in Hong Kong have organized rallies over the past weeks, calling for the withdrawal of a controversial extradition bill, the resignation of the territory's chief executive Carrie Lam, an investigation into police brutality, and drop riot charges against peaceful protesters. (Photo by Anthony Kwan/Getty Images)
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Anti-extradition protesters move barricades on a street outside the Legislative Council Complex ahead of the annual flag raising ceremony of 22nd anniversary of the city's handover from Britain to China on July 1, 2019 in Hong Kong, China. Pro-democracy demonstrators in Hong Kong have organized rallies over the past weeks, calling for the withdrawal of a controversial extradition bill, the resignation of the territory's chief executive Carrie Lam, an investigation into police brutality, and drop riot charges against peaceful protesters. (Photo by Anthony Kwan/Getty Images)
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Chinese, left, and Hong Kong flags are displayed outside the Central Government Offices in Hong Kong, China, Saturday, Oct. 4, 2014. A week into demonstrations in Hong Kong notable for their order and endurance, protesters came under attack from opponents, highlighting the fault lines of a city torn between commercial interests and a desire for greater democracy. Photographer: Tomohiro Ohsumi/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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Chinese, left, and Hong Kong flags are displayed outside the Central Government Offices in Hong Kong, China, Saturday, Oct. 4, 2014. A week into demonstrations in Hong Kong notable for their order and endurance, protesters came under attack from opponents, highlighting the fault lines of a city torn between commercial interests and a desire for greater democracy. Photographer: Tomohiro Ohsumi/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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(CNN) —  

The Chinese government and state-run media have accused Western countries of hypocrisy in their attitude to violent protests in Spain, Chile and Hong Kong over the past week.

Some articles even allege that demonstrations in Europe and South America are the direct result of Western tolerance of Hong Kong unrest, now in its 20th week.

Speaking to reporters on Monday night, Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying said that the response by Western countries to the protests showed “democracy and human rights are only a pretentious cover for Western interference in Hong Kong affairs.”

“More and more people have come to realize that ‘human rights’, ‘democracy’ and ‘beautiful sights’ preached by some Western politicians are just illusory as a mirage in the desert,” she said.

In a commentary published in the state-run Beijing News on Sunday, former Chinese diplomat Wang Zhen wrote “the disastrous impact of a ‘chaotic Hong Kong’ has begun to influence the Western world.”

Over the past week, protesters have clashed with authorities in all three locations for different reasons, but Chinese state media alleged that demonstrators in Chile and Spain were taking their cues from Hong Kong.

Protesters attend a pro-democracy march in Hong Kong on October 20.
PHOTO: DALE DE LA REY/AFP via Getty Images
Protesters attend a pro-democracy march in Hong Kong on October 20.

Hong Kong’s protests have become increasingly destructive in the past month, with widespread vandalism and trashing of stores seen as pro-Beijing during demonstrations.

On Sunday a march in the popular shopping district of Tsim Sha Tsui quickly deteriorated into violence as petrol bombs were thrown and fires were lit in subway stations and outside shops.

According to Wang, protesters in Spain had begun to adopt Hong Kong tactics, including the “Be Water” slogan to avoid police.

Protesters have been gathering on the streets of Barcelona to call for Catalonia independence after pro-independence politicians were imprisoned with lengthy sentences. More than 200 police officers have been injured and 171 vehicles damaged since the protests began last week.

Demonstrators light fires following a week of protests over the jail sentences given to separatist politicians by Spain's Supreme Court, on October 19 in Barcelona.
PHOTO: Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images Europe/Getty Images
Demonstrators light fires following a week of protests over the jail sentences given to separatist politicians by Spain's Supreme Court, on October 19 in Barcelona.

In Chile, the military issued a curfew for the capital city of Santiago after prolonged demonstrations against a hike in public transport costs. Three people were killed in a supermarket fire in the city on Sunday.

The same day, an editorial in state-run tabloid Global Times accused Hong Kong demonstrators of “exporting revolution to the world.”

“The West is paying the price for supporting riots in Hong Kong, which has quickly kindled violence in other parts of the world and foreboded the political risks that the West can’t manage,” the editorial said.

The United States has repeatedly voiced support for the Hong Kong protesters, to the fury of the Chinese government.

Anti-government demonstrators clash with police as they protest against cost of living increases on October 20 in Santiago, Chile.
PHOTO: Marcelo Hernandez/Getty Images South America/Getty Images
Anti-government demonstrators clash with police as they protest against cost of living increases on October 20 in Santiago, Chile.

On October 14, the US House of Representatives passed legislation in support of the Hong Kong activists which could see major financial penalties imposed on the major Chinese financial hub if Beijing cracks down on the city.

In a video editorial posted to the Global Times official Twitter on October 17, editor Hu Xijin suggested protests could spread throughout the West.

“There are many problems in the West and all kinds of undercurrents of dissatisfaction. Many of them will eventually manifest in the way the Hong Kong protests did,” he said.

“Catalonia is probably just the beginning.”

There has been a series of bloody attacks on pro-protester and pro-Beijing supporters in Hong Kong this month. On October 12, a police officer was slashed in the neck while walking through a subway station, leading to two arrests. He was taken to hospital in a stable condition.

Three days later, Jimmy Sham, a prominent protest march organizer, was attacked by a group of men wielding hammers and knives. He was left with wounds to the back of his skull and forehead.

There has been no sign of an end to the ongoing demonstrations, which started June to protest against a controversial China extradition treaty, but have since broadened to include calls for democracy.

Police fire tear gas to disperse protestors in Hong Kong on Sunday.
PHOTO: Mark Schiefelbein/AP
Police fire tear gas to disperse protestors in Hong Kong on Sunday.

In a commentary published in People’s Daily, the official Chinese Communist Party mouthpiece, Fudan University academic Shen Yi accused the West of “double standards” in its responses to protests in other countries.

“We still remember that certain people in the West called the large demonstrations in Hong Kong ‘a beautiful sight to behold’,” Shen wrote, before asking if those same commentators would support Catalan protests.

“If they don’t, they are applying double standards to the Hong Kong and Catalonia problems.”

In a separate opinion piece published in People’s Daily on Friday, Wang, the former diplomat, asked why Hong Kong’s protesters were described as “warriors for freedom and democracy,” while in Spain the Catalan demonstrators were “separatists.”

CNN’s Serenitie Wang contributed to this article.