WESTERVILLE, OHIO - OCTOBER 15: Former Vice President Joe Biden challenges Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) during the Democratic Presidential Debate at Otterbein University on October 15, 2019 in Westerville, Ohio. A record 12 presidential hopefuls are participating in the debate hosted by CNN and The New York Times. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Win McNamee/Getty Images North America/Getty Images
WESTERVILLE, OHIO - OCTOBER 15: Former Vice President Joe Biden challenges Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) during the Democratic Presidential Debate at Otterbein University on October 15, 2019 in Westerville, Ohio. A record 12 presidential hopefuls are participating in the debate hosted by CNN and The New York Times. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:12
Warren overtakes Biden in CNN rankings
US President Joe Biden speaks about the 50 million doses of the Covid-19 vaccine shot administered in the US during an event commemorating the milestone in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building in Washington, DC, February 25, 2021. (Photo by SAUL LOEB / AFP) (Photo by SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images)
PHOTO: Saul Loeb/AFP/etty Images
US President Joe Biden speaks about the 50 million doses of the Covid-19 vaccine shot administered in the US during an event commemorating the milestone in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building in Washington, DC, February 25, 2021. (Photo by SAUL LOEB / AFP) (Photo by SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
02:28
Axelrod explains the message Biden is sending with strike
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 13: Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) walks from his office to the Senate Chamber for the fifth day of former President Donald Trump
PHOTO: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 13: Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) walks from his office to the Senate Chamber for the fifth day of former President Donald Trump's impeachment trial at the U.S. Capitol on February 13, 2021 in Washington, DC. House impeachment managers asked the senate Saturday for the ability to question witnesses as part of the trial. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:07
McConnell says he'd support Trump as GOP nominee
The Pentagon, the headquarters of the US Department of Defense, located in Arlington County, across the Potomac River from Washington, DC is seen from the air January 24, 2017.  / AFP PHOTO / Daniel SLIM        (Photo credit should read DANIEL SLIM/AFP via Getty Images)
PHOTO: Daniel Slim/Getty Images
The Pentagon, the headquarters of the US Department of Defense, located in Arlington County, across the Potomac River from Washington, DC is seen from the air January 24, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / Daniel SLIM (Photo credit should read DANIEL SLIM/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
05:24
US carries out airstrikes on Iran-backed militia groups
The exterior of the U.S. Capitol building is seen at sunrise on February 8, 2021 in Washington, DC. The Senate is scheduled to begin the second impeachment trial of former U.S. President Donald J. Trump on February 9.
PHOTO: Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images
The exterior of the U.S. Capitol building is seen at sunrise on February 8, 2021 in Washington, DC. The Senate is scheduled to begin the second impeachment trial of former U.S. President Donald J. Trump on February 9.
Now playing
01:57
Senate parliamentarian rules against minimum wage increase in relief bill
Now playing
03:56
Marjorie Taylor Greene's challenger explains decision to run
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
03:44
Acting US Capitol Police chief explains 'operational challenges' from January 6 riot
Rep. Marie Newman (D-IL) speaks with CNN
PHOTO: CNN
Rep. Marie Newman (D-IL) speaks with CNN's Alisyn Camerota.
Now playing
07:17
Lawmaker reacts to Rep. Taylor Greene's tweet on her transgender daughter
Connolly
PHOTO: CNN
Connolly
Now playing
03:51
'I will not be lectured' on bipartisanship: Lawmaker fires back at Jim Jordan
US President Donald Trump speaks to the press from the South Lawn of the White House after announcing and initial deal with China in Washington, DC, prior to departing to Lake Charles, Louisiana to hold a campaign rally on October 11, 2019.
PHOTO: NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images
US President Donald Trump speaks to the press from the South Lawn of the White House after announcing and initial deal with China in Washington, DC, prior to departing to Lake Charles, Louisiana to hold a campaign rally on October 11, 2019.
Now playing
02:28
Romney says he's 'pretty sure' Trump will win 2024 nomination if he runs
Now playing
02:04
Senate moderates create obstacle for Biden's nominee
This picture taken 26 December 2011 shows the Pentagon building in Washington, DC.  The Pentagon, which is the headquarters of the United States Department of Defense (DOD), is the world
PHOTO: Staff/AFP/Getty Images
This picture taken 26 December 2011 shows the Pentagon building in Washington, DC. The Pentagon, which is the headquarters of the United States Department of Defense (DOD), is the world's largest office building by floor area, with about 6,500,000 sq ft (600,000 m2), of which 3,700,000 sq ft (340,000 m2) are used as offices. Approximately 23,000 military and civilian employees and about 3,000 non-defense support personnel work in the Pentagon. (Photo credit should read STAFF/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
04:30
Pentagon report gives insight on White supremacists in active military
Now playing
03:57
GOP senator continues to push riot conspiracy theory
Now playing
02:08
Cabinet secretary explains why he took on challenging role
Rep. Debra Haaland (D-NM), President Joe Biden
PHOTO: Leigh Vogel/Pool/Getty Images
Rep. Debra Haaland (D-NM), President Joe Biden's nominee for Secretary of the Interior, testifies during her confirmation hearing before the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resource, at the U.S. Capitol on February 24, 2021 in Washington, DC.
Now playing
00:59
'We need to work together': Haaland responds to question on blind loyalty
Now playing
01:35
Laughter follows awkward moment between GOP leaders

(This is the 22nd edition of our power rankings of Democrats most likely to get their party’s presidential nomination in 2020.)

(CNN) —  

Within the first 10 minutes of Tuesday’s fourth presidential debate, you could tell something fundamental had changed in the race: Elizabeth Warren is the new front-runner.

The Massachusetts senator was attacked from all sides from the get-go – on how she planned to fund her “Medicare for All” plan, on the “punitive” nature of her policy solutions, and on her supposed claims to be the only one in the field who had bold ideas.

By our count, at least seven other candidates on the stage attacked Warren at some point during the three-hour debate. That dynamic ensured that the fourth debate wouldn’t be as successful for Warren as the previous three – no one can take that amount of incoming and emerge unscathed – but also proved, very clearly, that no matter what the polls show, her rivals believe her to be the one to beat in this race.

We’ve reflected that changed reality in our latest 2020 rankings. Below, the 10 men and women with the best chance of emerging as the Democratic nominee in 2020.

10. Tom Steyer: If you saw an unfamiliar man on Tuesday’s debate stage, you probably were looking at Steyer. The businessman managed to qualify for the debate by buying a lot of ads in the early primary states to boost his poll numbers. It won’t be the last time Steyer appears on stage, as he has already qualified for November’s debate. That puts him in a better position than a majority of Democrats running. (Previous ranking: 10)

9. Beto O’Rourke: It’s not at all clear to us that the former Texas congressman understands his current peril in this race. He hasn’t qualified for the November debate and, if his performance in Tuesday night’s gathering is any indication, he probably won’t. Try to remember a memorable moment for O’Rourke from the debate. Chances are that if you can come up with one, it’s when South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg smacked him down for an alleged lecture on courage. Not great, Bob! (Previous ranking: 6)

8. Andrew Yang: Although Yang has been on the stage for every debate so far, Tuesday seemed like the first one where he actually got some real attention. Once the number of debaters shrinks, the question is, does Yang get even more attention? He’s going to need it. Yang has a devoted set of supporters, but his unconventional message has failed to light up most Democrats. (Previous ranking: 8)

7. Amy Klobuchar: The Minnesota senator has been our longtime dark horse in this race, and her performance on Tuesday – finally – showed what she’s capable of. Klobuchar was pointed – especially with Warren – and got to make her case that she is a Midwesterner who has a track record of winning where Democrats need to win to beat President Donald Trump. Will it matter? Well, Klobuchar raised more than $1 million in the 24 hours after her strong debate showing but she still hasn’t qualified for the November debate. So, maybe? (Previous ranking: 9)

6. Cory Booker: If you watched Tuesday night’s debate, you saw another solid (even if not spectacular) performance from Booker. He’ll need another one next month, too. Right now, the Democratic race is mostly a fight between Biden and Warren. What Booker wants is to be an alternative, if voters start looking for one. Unlike anyone in our top five, Booker hasn’t had his moment in the sun. He remains popular in Iowa, so he just may get that moment. (Previous ranking: 7)

5. Kamala Harris: The only reason the California senator stays in the top 5 after what was a hugely lackluster debate performance is that she had $10 million on hand at the end of September and polling still puts her above the 2% and less crowd – albeit narrowly. The debate was a microcosm of Harris’ problems in this race. Does she really think that goading Warren to support her call for a Twitter ban on Trump is going to get her where she wants to go? (Previous ranking: 5)

4. Pete Buttigieg: Initial data suggests that the South Bend mayor benefited by going after Warren in Tuesday’s debate. Let’s be very real: Buttigieg’s bid relies almost entirely on Iowa. He has to finish strong and probably needs to win the caucuses. He’s within 10 points of the lead there and is very well liked. But even if Buttigieg wins in Iowa, he needs to show some signs of life with nonwhite voters. So far, his support with them is close to 0%. (Previous ranking: 4)

3. Bernie Sanders: If you were worried that Sanders’ recent heart attack would fundamentally change him or his presidential bid, Tuesday’s debate made clear that wasn’t happening. Sanders was as acerbic and blunt as ever. And the news that he has secured the endorsement of Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (as well as several other members of the Squad) changed the story from one about his health to one focused on his continued support from high-profile liberals. That, plus Sanders’ $33 million-plus war chest, means he is going to be in the race for, well, about as long as he wants to be. (Previous ranking: 3)

2. Joe Biden: The former vice president finds himself not in the top spot our list for the first time since April. That’s what happens when you’re spending campaign money faster than you can raise it. The good news for Biden is that he still leads in the average national primary poll, and his support among black voters remains as solid as ever. Still, if there is any doubt that Biden’s front-runner status isn’t as clear as it once was could be seen by the lack of attacks from fellow Democrats in Tuesday’s debate. (Previous ranking: 1)

1. Elizabeth Warren: The Massachusetts senator knocks Biden out of the top spot this week after holding down the number two position since early August. Why? She’s the clear Iowa front-runner. She’s got a geographic appeal in New Hampshire. Liberals love her. She’s positioned herself as the “ideas” candidate. She has $25 million to spend in the race. She has all the momentum right now. What could stop Warren? You saw a preview of it in Tuesday’s debate: Her support of Medicare for All coupled with her clear unwillingness to acknowledge the obvious – that funding the program will require raising taxes on middle-class families. (Previous ranking: 2)