A picture taken on October 16, 2019 at the Parc Zoologique de Paris (Paris zoological gardens) shows a Physarum Polycephalum better known as a "Blob", an unicellular organism neither plant, mushroom nor animal and capable of learning despite its lack of neuron. (Photo by STEPHANE DE SAKUTIN / AFP) (Photo by STEPHANE DE SAKUTIN/AFP via Getty Images)
PHOTO: STEPHANE DE SAKUTIN/AFP/AFP via Getty Images
A picture taken on October 16, 2019 at the Parc Zoologique de Paris (Paris zoological gardens) shows a Physarum Polycephalum better known as a "Blob", an unicellular organism neither plant, mushroom nor animal and capable of learning despite its lack of neuron. (Photo by STEPHANE DE SAKUTIN / AFP) (Photo by STEPHANE DE SAKUTIN/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
00:55
Meet the 'blob,' neither plant, animal nor fungus
PHOTO: WJAR
Now playing
01:11
These 1,300-pound 'reef balls' could bring back the fish
With the help of state-of-the-art robotic technology, archeologists uncovered a 500-year-old shipwreck deep in the Baltic Sea that dates back to the Renaissance era.
PHOTO: Deep Sea Productions/MMT
With the help of state-of-the-art robotic technology, archeologists uncovered a 500-year-old shipwreck deep in the Baltic Sea that dates back to the Renaissance era.
Now playing
01:06
500-year-old shipwreck discovered using robotic cameras
Located some 2,000 kilometres off the southeast coast of continental Africa, Mauritius has been consistently rated by the Index of African Governance as the best-run country in sub-Saharan Africa. Ethical Traveler,  adds that it holds regular free elections and has a high human rights record. On the negative side, the organization says domestic violence against women, gender inequality,  arbitrary arrests and prison overcrowding are among the major concerns still facing Mauritius.
PHOTO: David Cannon/Getty Images
Located some 2,000 kilometres off the southeast coast of continental Africa, Mauritius has been consistently rated by the Index of African Governance as the best-run country in sub-Saharan Africa. Ethical Traveler, adds that it holds regular free elections and has a high human rights record. On the negative side, the organization says domestic violence against women, gender inequality, arbitrary arrests and prison overcrowding are among the major concerns still facing Mauritius.
Now playing
00:57
In 2017, a 'lost continent' was found under Mauritius as well
PHOTO: Florida Aquarium
Now playing
02:13
How scientists could save coral from brink of extinction
LEORANI, NEPAL - MARCH 22:  First light hits the Himalayas as Prince Harry watches the sun rise after spending the night in the Himalayan  hilltop village of Leorani on day four of his visit to Nepal on March 22, 2016 in Leorani, Nepal. Prince Harry is on a five day visit to Nepal, his first official tour of the country.  (Photo by Chris Jackson - Pool/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Chris Jackson/Chris Jackson Collection/Getty Images
LEORANI, NEPAL - MARCH 22: First light hits the Himalayas as Prince Harry watches the sun rise after spending the night in the Himalayan hilltop village of Leorani on day four of his visit to Nepal on March 22, 2016 in Leorani, Nepal. Prince Harry is on a five day visit to Nepal, his first official tour of the country. (Photo by Chris Jackson - Pool/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:15
Tectonic plates created some of the world's greatest wonders
ATHENS, GREECE - JUNE 26: Plastic cups used by tourists on the Aegean sea beach near Athens on June 26, 2018 , Greece . The Mediterranean is one of the seas with the highest levels of plastic pollution in the world .More than 200 million tourists visit the Mediterranean each year causing the 40% increase in marine litter during summer  using  single use plastics including straws and stirrers, plastic cups, water bottles , inflatable pool toys etc which   leads to the general pollution of water and beaches along Mediterranean. (Photo by Milos Bicanski/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Milos Bicanski/Getty Images
ATHENS, GREECE - JUNE 26: Plastic cups used by tourists on the Aegean sea beach near Athens on June 26, 2018 , Greece . The Mediterranean is one of the seas with the highest levels of plastic pollution in the world .More than 200 million tourists visit the Mediterranean each year causing the 40% increase in marine litter during summer using single use plastics including straws and stirrers, plastic cups, water bottles , inflatable pool toys etc which leads to the general pollution of water and beaches along Mediterranean. (Photo by Milos Bicanski/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:22
Plastic pollution is killing these animals
Now playing
00:49
Ancient ruins reveal city that housed 6,000 people
PHOTO: Parks Canada, Underwater Archaeology Team
Now playing
01:32
Shipwreck video reveals more about doomed polar expedition
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
01:00
Indonesia's famed Komodo Island will limit tourism
robert ballard titanic discovery cold war sub hunting mission newday vpx_00005402.jpg
PHOTO: Emory Kristof/National Geographic
robert ballard titanic discovery cold war sub hunting mission newday vpx_00005402.jpg
Now playing
02:43
Titanic was found during secret Cold War mission
exploring tokyo waterways_00000000.jpg
exploring tokyo waterways_00000000.jpg
Now playing
02:36
Rediscovering Tokyo's historic waterways
Shipwreck boat found by diver 102 years later kc orig_00000000.jpg
Shipwreck boat found by diver 102 years later kc orig_00000000.jpg
Now playing
00:51
After years of research diver finds shipwreck from 1917
(CNN) —  

It is bright yellow, can creep along at a speed of up to 4 centimeters (1.6 inches) per hour, can solve problems even though it doesn’t have a brain and can heal itself if it is cut in two.

Meet the “blob,” an unusual organism which will go on display Saturday at the Paris Zoological Park, as part of a first-of-its-kind exhibition intended to showcase its rare abilities.

The slime mold, which is known officially as physarum polycephalum (or “the many headed slime”) is neither a plant, an animal or a fungus. It doesn’t have two sexes – male and female – it has 720. And it can also split into different organisms and then fuse back together, according to a press release from the Zoological Park.

The unicellular being is believed to be around a billion years old, but it first came to the public’s attention in May 1973, after a Texas woman discovered a rapidly-expanding yellow blob growing in her backyard. With its otherworldly, extraterrestrial appearance, the blob became a brief media sensation, even picking up a mention in the New York Times.

The Texas blob died as quickly as it had appeared, and the world all but forgot about the peculiar slime until new research published in 2016 caused a stir among the science community.

The study, published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society and co-authored by Audrey Dussutour, a biologist at France’s National Center for Scientific Research, showed that physarum polycephalum could learn to ignore noxious substances, and remember that behavior up to a year later.

The slime mold is also believed to be capable of solving problems, such as finding the shortest way to exit a labyrinth and anticipating changes in its environment, according to scientific researchers at the Zoological Park.

Dwelling on forest floors

Scientists initially grew the organism in petri dishes, feeding it oatmeal, its favorite food, according to a video published by the Zoological Park. Once it had reached a certain size, it was grafted onto tree bark – which it feeds on – and placed in a terrarium, where visitors will be able to view it from October 19.

“Acacia trees, oak bark and chestnut bark are its favorite places,” said the Zoological Park’s Marlene Itan.

Blobs are normally found on forest floors in Europe, she added. “It thrives in temperatures oscillating between 19 and 25 degrees Celsius (66 to 77 degrees Fahrenheit) and when humidity levels reach 80% to 100%,” said Itan.

Almost immortal, its only foes are light and drought, according to the Zoological Park’s press materials. But it can also hibernate during several years when threatened.

The blob takes its name from a 1958 cult horror-movie starring Steve McQueen, in which an alien life form takes over a small town in Pennsylvania.