PHOTO: John General
Now playing
03:17
Why Amazon Prime Video isn't Netflix
White House press secretary Jen Psaki speaks during her first press briefing at the White House, Wednesday, Jan. 20, 2021, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
White House press secretary Jen Psaki speaks during her first press briefing at the White House, Wednesday, Jan. 20, 2021, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
PHOTO: Evan Vucci/AP
Now playing
01:48
WH press secretary vows transparency and honesty on first day
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
06:48
Biden fist-bumps members of the media during inaugural parade
Now playing
01:26
Kaitlan Collins cracks up over CNN throwback video
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
01:53
'Wow! She actually said that': Cooper reacts to Fox Business host's false riot claim
Now playing
04:44
CNBC host reveals why he left Fox News
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 12: U.S. President Donald Trump turns to reporters as he exits the White House to walk toward Marine One on the South Lawn on January 12, 2021 in Washington, DC. Following last week
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 12: U.S. President Donald Trump turns to reporters as he exits the White House to walk toward Marine One on the South Lawn on January 12, 2021 in Washington, DC. Following last week's deadly pro-Trump riot at the U.S. Capitol, President Trump is making his first public appearance with a trip to the town of Alamo, Texas to view the construction of the wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Drew Angerer/Getty Images
Now playing
01:54
Right-wing media slams GOP lawmakers who voted to impeach
Now playing
02:26
Stelter: Right-wing media has shifted in a way I've never seen before
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 12:  Joe Scarborough attends the "The Right Path: From Ike To Reagan, How Republicans Once Mastered Politics - And Can Again" book event on November 12, 2013 in New York, United States.  (Photo by Rob Kim/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 12: Joe Scarborough attends the "The Right Path: From Ike To Reagan, How Republicans Once Mastered Politics - And Can Again" book event on November 12, 2013 in New York, United States. (Photo by Rob Kim/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Rob Kim/Getty Images
Now playing
01:22
Joe Scarborough drops f-bomb in on-air rant against rioters
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
02:55
Stelter: Notable that Fox News hasn't promoted this
PHOTO: Fox News
Now playing
02:07
Watch these Fox News hosts criticize holiday travel guidance
screengrab Martin Kenyon
screengrab Martin Kenyon
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
03:03
British man becomes internet sensation after interview with CNN
PHOTO: Photo Illustration: Jim Spellman/WireImage
Now playing
04:38
Bon Appetit had a culture problem. She wants to change that
PHOTO: Fox
Now playing
02:01
Tucker Carlson claims vaccine campaign 'feels false, because it is'
local news anchor unemployment help newsroom intv vpx _00001423.png
local news anchor unemployment help newsroom intv vpx _00001423.png
PHOTO: WRGB
Now playing
04:50
How a news anchor helped over 4,000 Americans this year
PHOTO: Fox News
Now playing
00:57
Watch President Trump's first on-camera interview since the election
(CNN Business) —  

AMC (AMC) Theatres, the largest movie theater chain in the world, is getting into streaming.

The company is launching AMC Theatres On Demand, a digital movie service that will allow members of its Stubs loyalty program the chance to rent or buy from 2,000 films produced by major Hollywood studios like Disney (DIS) and Universal.

Members will be able to download new films once they’ve completed a run in theaters, and will have access to a library of older films, AMC announced Tuesday. Films will cost roughly between $3 and $5.99 to rent and $9.99 to $19.99 to buy. Much like Amazon (AMZN)’s Prime Video or Apple (AAPL)’s iTunes Store, AMC Theatres On Demand will allow its users to buy and rent films via its website and SmartTV and mobile apps. More than 20 million households are subscribed to AMC’s Stubs program, according to the company.

AMC’s new service comes at a time when the theater industry finds itself at odds with streaming companies. Netflix (NFLX) has made a habit of skirting the theater’s traditional 90-day release window before making its films available to stream at home.

Just recently, Netflix announced that Martin Scorsese’s gangster film, “The Irishman,” which stars Robert De Niro and Al Pacino, would skip a wide theatrical run. The film will instead hit independent theaters on November 1 and then Netflix a few weeks later on November 27.

The issue really boils down to money. Services like Netflix and Amazon Prime Video want to keep its subscribers satisfied with exclusive original content. Movie theaters like AMC rely on making money from foot traffic to the box office and from concession sales.

AMC Theatres On Demand allows the company to split the difference. AMC is able to promote its product and its popular loyalty program to consumers who use streaming while not giving up on its long-standing, traditional business of getting audiences in seats.

“Through the launch of AMC Theatres On Demand, we can reach movie lovers directly and make it easy for them to access films digitally,” Adam Aron, CEO of AMC Theatres, said in a statement.

AMC Theatres also has a subscription-based ticket service called AMC Stubs A-List, which allows subscribers to see up to three movies per week for $19.95 to $24.95. The service was created as a competitor of another subscription ticket service, MoviePass, which was shut down last month.