President Donald Trump speaks to the media on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Friday, October 4, 2019, before his departure to nearby Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland.
President Donald Trump speaks to the media on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Friday, October 4, 2019, before his departure to nearby Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland.
PHOTO: Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP
Now playing
03:17
Trump changes his story as evidence mounts
Now playing
04:22
Trump's influential supporters spoke of what was coming before riot
McCarthy
McCarthy
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
01:40
'Far too close:' Army secretary reveals sobering details on riot
Sen. Graham/Erin Burnett split
Sen. Graham/Erin Burnett split
PHOTO: Fox News/CNN
Now playing
04:08
Burnett: Sen. Graham became 'sycophant in chief' under Trump
US President Donald Trump waves to the media as he makes his way to board Air Force One before departing from Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland on January 12, 2021. - Trump is traveling to Texas to review his border wall project. (Photo by MANDEL NGAN / AFP) (Photo by MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump waves to the media as he makes his way to board Air Force One before departing from Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland on January 12, 2021. - Trump is traveling to Texas to review his border wall project. (Photo by MANDEL NGAN / AFP) (Photo by MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images)
PHOTO: Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images
Now playing
03:44
Trump mostly in seclusion during final days of presidency
PHOTO: KamalaHarris/Twitter
Now playing
01:28
Kamala Harris says goodbye to California Senate seat
PHOTO: @FLOTUS
Now playing
02:51
Watch Melania Trump's farewell message
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 4: Rep. Lauren Boebert, R-Colo., is seen during a group photo with freshmen members of the House Republican Conference on the House steps of the Capitol on Monday, January 4, 2021. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 4: Rep. Lauren Boebert, R-Colo., is seen during a group photo with freshmen members of the House Republican Conference on the House steps of the Capitol on Monday, January 4, 2021. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images)
PHOTO: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc/Getty Images
Now playing
02:49
GOP lawmaker accused of giving 'reconnaissance' tour prior to Capitol riot
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
04:36
Former FBI adviser calls Trump a charismatic spark for extremism
Andrew McCabe 0118
Andrew McCabe 0118
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
02:01
Andrew McCabe compares Capitol attack to Benghazi attack
Now playing
03:07
Avlon: Here's a way to turn down the 'MAGAphone'
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
02:09
Lawmaker slams riot: 'Damned if I'll let it' shake faith in democracy
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
04:01
Raskin: I'm not losing my son in 2020 and my country in 2021
Now playing
01:19
Sen. King: Cutting off Trump's intel access should be easy decision for Biden
A sign for the National Security Agency (NSA), US Cyber Command and Central Security Service, is seen near the visitor
A sign for the National Security Agency (NSA), US Cyber Command and Central Security Service, is seen near the visitor's entrance to the headquarters of the National Security Agency (NSA) after a shooting incident at the entrance in Fort Meade, Maryland, February 14, 2018. - Shots were fired early Wednesday at the ultra-secret National Security Agency, the US electronic spying agency outside Washington, leaving one person injured, officials said. Aerial footage of the scene from NBC News showed a black SUV with numerous bullet holes in its windshield crashed into concrete barriers at the main entrance to the NSA's headquarters in Fort Meade, Maryland. (Photo by SAUL LOEB / AFP) (Photo by SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images)
PHOTO: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images
Now playing
01:31
Christopher Miller orders NSA chief to install Trump loyalist as agency's top lawyer
Now playing
02:38
Biden: Science team 'among the brightest, most dedicated'
(CNN) —  

It seemed like every time you turned your TV on this week, Donald Trump was talking about Ukraine.

That’s an exaggeration, but not much of one. Trump held court twice on Thursday – once at a photo availability with the Finnish President and once in a more formal press briefing – and then worked the media rope line outside the White House for more than 20 minutes Friday morning before heading to Walter Reed hospital.

The President talking to the media is a good thing! For the media and the American public! But man oh man, is it a bad thing for this President – especially as he tries to downplay the potential damage the ongoing impeachment inquiry in the House could do him.

Why? Because Trump has a habit of saying the quiet part out loud. Like on Thursday, when he said this about his desire for the Ukrainians to investigate Joe Biden and his son, Hunter:

“Well I would think that if they were honest about it, they’d start a major investigation into the Bidens. It’s a very simple answer. They should investigate the Bidens. Likewise, China should start an investigation into the Bidens because what happened in China is just about as bad as what happened with Ukraine. So, I would say that President Zelensky, if it were me, I would recommend that they start an investigation into the Bidens.”

(Sidebar: Trump almost certainly added China into that quote because he was aware of a story, first reported by CNN, that he had raised Biden and Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren in a June phone conversation with Chinese President Xi Jinping.)

Trump’s open urging that foreign countries open investigations into his primary rival for the presidency in 2020 led the New Yorker’s Susan Glasser to wonder “Did Donald Trump just Self-Impeach?

Trump’s loquacity is born of two interconnected realities: 1) he believes himself to be his own best advocate and messenger and 2) when he feels back into a corner or in peril, his natural tendency is to unleash a series of verbal onslaughts at all available targets.

The problem for Trump here is that the more he talks, the more fodder he gives Democrats in their ongoing impeachment inquiry. It’s not all that different from Trump’s repeated public attempts to get in the way of special counsel Robert Mueller’s probe – moves that led Mueller to make clear in his final report that he could not rule out the idea Trump had purposely obstructed the probe.

The Point: Trump has never understood that silence can be golden. And he won’t suddenly realize it now. But the more he talks, the more trouble he courts.

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

And that was the week in 39 headlines.