President Donald Trump speaks to member of the media as he departs a ceremonial swearing in ceremony for new Labor Secretary Eugene Scalia in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, September 30, 2019.
PHOTO: Andrew Harnik/AP
President Donald Trump speaks to member of the media as he departs a ceremonial swearing in ceremony for new Labor Secretary Eugene Scalia in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, September 30, 2019.
Now playing
02:56
Trump 'trying to find out' whistleblower's identity
Now playing
01:35
Laughter follows awkward moment between GOP leaders
PHOTO: AFP/Getty Images/CNN
Now playing
03:11
Cabrera: GOP suddenly cares about mean tweets ... just not Trump's
Now playing
03:20
Avlon on Ron Johnson: Hyperpartisan denial is a hell of a drug
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 06: Pro-Trump supporters storm the U.S. Capitol following a rally with President Donald Trump on January 6, 2021 in Washington, DC. Trump supporters gathered in the nation
PHOTO: Samuel Corum/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 06: Pro-Trump supporters storm the U.S. Capitol following a rally with President Donald Trump on January 6, 2021 in Washington, DC. Trump supporters gathered in the nation's capital today to protest the ratification of President-elect Joe Biden's Electoral College victory over President Trump in the 2020 election. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Getty Images)
Now playing
03:04
Capitol officials say riot was planned and involved white supremacists
Then-President Donald Trump addresses supporters during a Make America Great Again rally in Erie, Pennsylvania, October 20, 2020.
PHOTO: SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images
Then-President Donald Trump addresses supporters during a Make America Great Again rally in Erie, Pennsylvania, October 20, 2020.
Now playing
02:44
What Trump's released tax records mean for DA's criminal case
Now playing
02:51
'This is incredible': Burnett explains Trump's reported offer to Kim Jong Un
From left, President Joe Biden, First Lady Jill Biden, Vice President Kamala Harris and her husband Doug Emhoff, bow their heads during a ceremony to honor the 500,000 Americans that died from COVID-19, at the White House, Monday, Feb. 22, 2021, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
PHOTO: Evan Vucci/AP
From left, President Joe Biden, First Lady Jill Biden, Vice President Kamala Harris and her husband Doug Emhoff, bow their heads during a ceremony to honor the 500,000 Americans that died from COVID-19, at the White House, Monday, Feb. 22, 2021, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
Now playing
05:45
Biden leads nation in mourning 500,000 US Covid-19 deaths
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
01:06
Honig: Public won't see Trump's taxes unless this happens
Now playing
02:00
Former FBI Deputy Director: Trump taxes 'massive trove of information'
Now playing
01:31
Lara Trump: Donald Trump may run in 2024 and beyond
gop rep michael mccaul texas winter storm response bash sotu vpx_00041202.png
gop rep michael mccaul texas winter storm response bash sotu vpx_00041202.png
Now playing
04:12
Texas GOP rep.: When a crisis hits my state, I don't go on vacation
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
04:18
GOP governor reacts to his nephew leaving the Republican Party
PHOTO: Getty Images
Now playing
03:00
'Forged over decades': WH reporter on Biden, Dole relationship
Now playing
01:26
Did Pence feel betrayed after riot? His former chief of staff responds
PHOTO: Getty Images
Now playing
03:34
'Real sense of betrayal': Reporter on GOP facing backlash over impeachment vote

Editor’s Note: Peter Eisner, former deputy foreign editor of The Washington Post, is co-author with Michael D’Antonio of “The Shadow President: The Truth About Mike Pence.” The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of the author. View more opinion articles on CNN.

(CNN) —  

To be fair to Mike Pence, he probably never dealt with someone like Donald Trump before 2016. Now Pence is hearing Trump’s critics compare the president to an organized crime boss. Whether or not he agrees, thanks to the movies, everyone knows how the game works and so the vice president surely had an inkling about President Trump’s modus operandi.

In fact, he had more than a hint of what was to come. “He was going into this with his eyes open,” a source close to Pence told me in 2018 referring to Pence’s decision to accept Trump’s offer in 2016 to run for vice president. “He knew exactly who Trump was and what he faced.” Pence already knew that Trump had come to the Republican nomination with lies and slander, starting with his campaign to claim that President Barack Obama was not born in the United States; and by 2016 Trump had denigrated Mexican immigrants, saying “They’re bringing drugs. They’re bringing crime. They’re rapists. And some, I assume, are good people.”

Peter Eisner
PHOTO: Courtesy of Peter Eisner
Peter Eisner

But Pence’s ambition was stronger than any possible concerns about the character of the man he would have to support, and wavered but did not back out even after the Access Hollywood tape was published in October 2016. Pence and his wife had already prayed for guidance—and decided he had a purpose and a mission, from God, to serve the country as vice president, said the source. “Once he got to that point, he never looked back.”

Pence should have expected that at some point his patron would make him get his hands dirty. It may have happened in the case of Trump’s scandalous, and perhaps impeachable, request that Ukraine investigate his political rival Joe Biden.

Trump’s Ukraine gambit appears to be a variation on classic extortion that started with his decision to freeze the roughly $400 million in military and security aid approved to help Ukraine fight its ongoing war against Russian invaders. “I would like you to do us a favor, though,” said Trump after Ukraine’s President Volodymyr Zelensky mentioned the aid in a phone call. Trump wanted Zelensky to look into the allegation that Ukrainians stole the Democratic National Committee email server during the 2016 campaign. This is a debunked conspiracy theory. He also asked Zelensky to work on the matter with Attorney General William Barr and Trump’s own personal lawyer, former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani.

Although Trump’s words were imprecise – he never said “Do this or you don’t get the $400 million” – his meaning was clear. A White House memo reconstructing the conversation showed the president returned to the subject of investigating former Vice President Biden repeatedly during their talk, Zelensky promised that his yet-to-be-named chief prosecutor would look into the matter.

Later, when seated beside Trump at a news conference, the Ukrainian leader said he didn’t feel pressure. This is something akin to a shop owner standing beside a shake-down artist and telling a beat cop, “Oh no, there’s no problem here.” What else would you expect him to say?

If nothing else, Trump only had to mention Giuliani’s name and Zelensky would understand what game was afoot. Everybody knows that Giuliani, who has no formal government position, is the president’s chief consigliere.

But now, despite Pence’s best efforts he is implicated in the same crisis that threatens Trump’s presidency. His name crops up throughout the scandal in which Trump withheld military aid to Ukraine. He is likely to face questioning about his role, and he could even be summoned by the House of Representatives impeachment inquiry that is gathering speed. Refusal could lead to an obstruction charge of his own.

Pence is at risk here for many reasons. Generally speaking, he is intensely loyal, eager to please the president and, as his decision to become Trump’s running mate shows, limited in his ability to see danger. In this specific case, the complaint filed by a whistleblower who outed Trump’s scheme references Pence. The whistleblower’s complaint didn’t accuse Pence of wrongdoing, but it said that the President instructed Pence to cancel his planned trip to attend Zelensky’s inauguration.

Worse, the president himself recently suggested to reporters, that they look into Pence’s communications with Zelensky. “And I think you should ask for VP Pence’s conversation, because he had a couple conversations also,” Trump said last Wednesday. “They’re all perfect.”

Vice President Pence also met with Zelensky on September 1 in Warsaw, before Trump’s tit-for-tat conversation was revealed. Pence has said that he did not mention Biden, but he did make it sound as though he, like Trump, was applying pressure. “We discussed America’s support for Ukraine and the upcoming decision the President will make on the latest tranche of financial support in great detail…but as President Trump had me make clear, we have great concerns about issues of corruption.” Pence spoke once more with Zelensky by telephone on September 18, about a week before the whistleblower complaint was revealed.

Now playing
01:35
Laughter follows awkward moment between GOP leaders
PHOTO: AFP/Getty Images/CNN
Now playing
03:11
Cabrera: GOP suddenly cares about mean tweets ... just not Trump's
Now playing
03:20
Avlon on Ron Johnson: Hyperpartisan denial is a hell of a drug
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 06: Pro-Trump supporters storm the U.S. Capitol following a rally with President Donald Trump on January 6, 2021 in Washington, DC. Trump supporters gathered in the nation
PHOTO: Samuel Corum/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 06: Pro-Trump supporters storm the U.S. Capitol following a rally with President Donald Trump on January 6, 2021 in Washington, DC. Trump supporters gathered in the nation's capital today to protest the ratification of President-elect Joe Biden's Electoral College victory over President Trump in the 2020 election. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Getty Images)
Now playing
03:04
Capitol officials say riot was planned and involved white supremacists
Then-President Donald Trump addresses supporters during a Make America Great Again rally in Erie, Pennsylvania, October 20, 2020.
PHOTO: SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images
Then-President Donald Trump addresses supporters during a Make America Great Again rally in Erie, Pennsylvania, October 20, 2020.
Now playing
02:44
What Trump's released tax records mean for DA's criminal case
Now playing
02:51
'This is incredible': Burnett explains Trump's reported offer to Kim Jong Un
From left, President Joe Biden, First Lady Jill Biden, Vice President Kamala Harris and her husband Doug Emhoff, bow their heads during a ceremony to honor the 500,000 Americans that died from COVID-19, at the White House, Monday, Feb. 22, 2021, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
PHOTO: Evan Vucci/AP
From left, President Joe Biden, First Lady Jill Biden, Vice President Kamala Harris and her husband Doug Emhoff, bow their heads during a ceremony to honor the 500,000 Americans that died from COVID-19, at the White House, Monday, Feb. 22, 2021, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
Now playing
05:45
Biden leads nation in mourning 500,000 US Covid-19 deaths
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
01:06
Honig: Public won't see Trump's taxes unless this happens
Now playing
02:00
Former FBI Deputy Director: Trump taxes 'massive trove of information'
Now playing
01:31
Lara Trump: Donald Trump may run in 2024 and beyond
gop rep michael mccaul texas winter storm response bash sotu vpx_00041202.png
gop rep michael mccaul texas winter storm response bash sotu vpx_00041202.png
Now playing
04:12
Texas GOP rep.: When a crisis hits my state, I don't go on vacation
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
04:18
GOP governor reacts to his nephew leaving the Republican Party
PHOTO: Getty Images
Now playing
03:00
'Forged over decades': WH reporter on Biden, Dole relationship
Now playing
01:26
Did Pence feel betrayed after riot? His former chief of staff responds
PHOTO: Getty Images
Now playing
03:34
'Real sense of betrayal': Reporter on GOP facing backlash over impeachment vote