President Donald Trump arrives at Los Angeles International Airport to attend a fundraiser, Tuesday, September 17, 2019, in Los Angeles.
Evan Vucci/AP
President Donald Trump arrives at Los Angeles International Airport to attend a fundraiser, Tuesday, September 17, 2019, in Los Angeles.
Now playing
02:32
Trump sues accounting firm Mazars and NY District Attorney
CNN
Now playing
02:02
Barr's answer draws scrutiny amid new scandal
CNN
Now playing
03:32
Watergate journalist: Trump's actions go further than Nixon's
raffensberger
CNN
raffensberger
Now playing
03:25
'This is unacceptable': Election official speaks out after threats against wife
Deep State Dogs
Now playing
03:29
See how internet sleuths are hunting down insurrectionists
Vladimir Putin NBC intv
NBC
Vladimir Putin NBC intv
Now playing
04:22
Hear how Putin compared Donald Trump to Joe Biden
Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger speaks during a news conference on Wednesday, November 11, 2020, in Atlanta.
Brynn Anderson/AP
Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger speaks during a news conference on Wednesday, November 11, 2020, in Atlanta.
Now playing
02:35
Family of GA secretary of state got death threats months after election
Pennsylvania State House
Now playing
02:04
Pennsylvania lawmaker to GOP: "Are you not 100 percent white?"
CNN
Now playing
01:28
'Fishing expedition': Honig slams Trump's DOJ
Getty Images/AP
Now playing
02:08
Trump runs into a problem in revenge quest against GOP governor
CNN
Now playing
02:32
Schiff reacts to DOJ subpoena: Shocked ... but not surprised
CNN
Now playing
04:38
Democratic lawmaker: Trump 'weaponized' DOJ against opponents
WASHINGTON, DC - DECEMBER 09: The Justice Department building on a foggy morning on December 9, 2019 in Washington, DC. It is expected that the Justice Department Inspector General will release his report on the investigation into the Justice and FBIs conduct during the FISA warrant process as it relates to the 2016 election today.(Photo by Samuel Corum/Getty Images)
Samuel Corum/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - DECEMBER 09: The Justice Department building on a foggy morning on December 9, 2019 in Washington, DC. It is expected that the Justice Department Inspector General will release his report on the investigation into the Justice and FBIs conduct during the FISA warrant process as it relates to the 2016 election today.(Photo by Samuel Corum/Getty Images)
Now playing
00:54
Here's the biggest problem Justice Department watchdog faces
CNN
Now playing
03:05
Progressive Democrats grow frustrated with Sen. Sinema
ST IVES, ENGLAND - JUNE 10:  First Lady Jill Biden, wearing a jacket with the phrase "Love" on the back, stands outside the Carbis Bay Hotel on June 10, 2021 in St Ives, England. UK Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, will host leaders from the USA, Japan, Germany, France, Italy and Canada at the G7 Summit which begins on Friday, June 11 2021. (Photo by Toby Melville-WPA Pool/Getty Images)
Toby Melville/WPA/Getty Images
ST IVES, ENGLAND - JUNE 10: First Lady Jill Biden, wearing a jacket with the phrase "Love" on the back, stands outside the Carbis Bay Hotel on June 10, 2021 in St Ives, England. UK Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, will host leaders from the USA, Japan, Germany, France, Italy and Canada at the G7 Summit which begins on Friday, June 11 2021. (Photo by Toby Melville-WPA Pool/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:43
'It's a troll': CNN reporter on Jill Biden's 'love' jacket
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 9: Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-MN) speaks during a press conference at Black Lives Matter Plaza calling for an end to U.S. support for a Saudi Arabia-led blockade of Yemen on April 9, 2021 in Washington, DC. 26 year-old Iman Saleh is on her 12th day of a hunger strike for Yemen in Washington, DC. Millions of Yemenis, including children, are on the edge of famine, which some attribute partially to the blockade that has choked the delivery of food and fuel into the country. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
Drew Angerer/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 9: Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-MN) speaks during a press conference at Black Lives Matter Plaza calling for an end to U.S. support for a Saudi Arabia-led blockade of Yemen on April 9, 2021 in Washington, DC. 26 year-old Iman Saleh is on her 12th day of a hunger strike for Yemen in Washington, DC. Millions of Yemenis, including children, are on the edge of famine, which some attribute partially to the blockade that has choked the delivery of food and fuel into the country. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
Now playing
03:15
Jewish House Dems condemn Rep. Omar's controversial comments
CNN —  

The US Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York said Monday that it plans to participate in the lawsuit filed by President Donald Trump to block a subpoena by the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office for eight years of his tax returns.

In a letter sent to the judge in the case, the office’s civil division chief said it would file a submission in the case by Wednesday, the deadline set by the judge last week.

Broader constitutional questions are at the heart of the dispute over the subpoenas, including whether the President can be criminally investigated.

Trump sued the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office two weeks ago after it sent his longtime accounting firm, Mazars USA, a grand jury subpoena seeking tax returns and related documents going back to 2011.

The district attorney’s office, led by Cyrus Vance Jr., is investigating the hush money payments made to two women who, during the 2016 campaign, alleged affairs with the President. Trump has denied having affairs with both women.

Prosecutors are looking at whether the Trump Organization violated any New York state laws – including potentially filing false business record – in its effort to reimburse Michael Cohen, Trump’s former attorney, who paid some of the hush money on Trump’s behalf. Cohen is serving a prison sentence after pleading guilty in a federal case concerning the payments.

In the lawsuit, Trump has argued that a criminal investigation of a sitting president is “unconstitutional,” and asked the judge to suspend the subpoena until he is no longer in office.

The US Attorney’s office had filed a brief last week saying it needed time to decide whether to get involved in the matter.

“In view of those constitutional issues and the federal interests that they may implicate, the United States is currently considering whether to participate in connection with the pending motion for a preliminary injunction,” the office wrote in its brief last week.