WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 26: Acting Director of National Intelligence Joseph Maguire is sworn in prior to testifying before the House Select Committee on Intelligence in the Rayburn House Office Building on Capitol Hill September 26, 2019 in Washington, DC. The committee questioned Maguire about a recent whistleblower complaint reportedly based on U.S. President Donald Trump pressuring Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelensky to investigate leading Democrats as "a favor" to him during a recent phone conversation.   (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 26: Acting Director of National Intelligence Joseph Maguire is sworn in prior to testifying before the House Select Committee on Intelligence in the Rayburn House Office Building on Capitol Hill September 26, 2019 in Washington, DC. The committee questioned Maguire about a recent whistleblower complaint reportedly based on U.S. President Donald Trump pressuring Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelensky to investigate leading Democrats as "a favor" to him during a recent phone conversation. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
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(CNN) —  

America’s top spy broke with Donald Trump and his Republican supporters Thursday, defending a whistleblower and intelligence committee watchdog who exposed contacts with Ukraine that could help lead to the President’s impeachment.

“I believe that the whistleblower and the inspector general have acted in good faith throughout. I have every reason to believe that they have done everything by the book and followed the law,” said acting Director of National Intelligence Joseph Maguire, testifying before a key House committee.

But Maguire declined to say whether he spoke to the President about the whistleblower complaint that alleged that Trump solicited the help of Ukraine to interfere in the 2020 election and that White House officials tried to hide his conduct, in the latest twist of a fast-escalating drama that has turned into the most serious crisis of Trump’s presidency.

“I am not partisan and I am not political,” said Maguire, a former Navy SEAL commander who served eight presidents in uniform and was not a well-known public figure until he was thrust into the glare of the scandal.

Democrats used the high profile forum to accuse the President of abusing his power and endangering national security. Republicans tried to pick holes in the complaint, noting that the unidentified whistleblower admitted not having first-hand knowledge of events including Trump’s call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky.

Under intense pressure from Democrats on the House Intelligence Committee, Maguire also acknowledged that his office consulted with the White House counsel’s office after receiving a complaint detailing allegations about Trump’s communications with Ukraine, because calls with foreign leaders usually fall under executive privilege.

Maguire had been accused before the hearing of caving into White House pressure not to follow the law and turn over a complaint that the intelligence community’s inspector general deemed “urgent and credible.”

The acting DNI repeatedly defended his handling of the complaint, telling lawmakers he followed the law in an “unprecedented” situation, despite claims to the contrary by Democrats that he infringed on their right to review the allegations.

His appearance before the committee and a closed door briefing before the Senate panel, came a day after lawmakers had their first chance to see the classified account that spurred Democrats to launch a formal impeachment inquiry. The account was declassified and released Thursday morning.

Allegations of a ‘coverup’

The complaint states that several White House officials were “deeply disturbed” by Trump’s July 25 phone call with Zelensky and tried to “lock down” all records of the phone call, especially the word-for-word transcript produced by the White House.

Maguire said during his testimony he did not have the authority to waive the executive privilege that covered the conversation with Ukraine’s President and would not say whether he discussed the complaint with Trump.

“My conversations with the President, because I’m the director of national intelligence, are privileged, and it would be inappropriate for me, because it would destroy my relationship with the President in intelligence matters, to divulge any of my conversations with the President of the United States,” Maguire said responding to a question from Rep. Jim Himes, a Connecticut Democrat.

But in a tense exchange with Democratic Rep. Eric Swalwell of California, Maguire conceded that “there is an allegation of a coverup.”

“But right now, all we have is an allegation — an allegation with second hand information from a whistleblower. I have no knowledge on whether or not that is true and accurate statement,” he said.

When asked later in the hearing if Trump asked him to disclose the identity of the whistleblower, Maguire told lawmakers,” I can tell you emphatically, no.”

He also said no one else within the White House or DOJ asked him to identify the whistleblower.

White House consulted after complaint

Initially, Maguire seemed to waver about the chronology of events related to his handling of the complaint but ultimately told lawmakers on the House Intelligence Committee that his office did seek guidance from the White House before raising the issue with the Office of Legal Counsel and Department of Justice, which advised he was not legally bound to provide it to the committee.

“Such calls are typically subject to executive privilege, as a result we consulted with the White House counsel’s office and were advised that much of the information of the complaint was in fact subject to executive privilege,” Maguire said. “A privilege that I do not have the authority to waive. Because of that we were unable to immediately share the details of the complaint with this committee.”

The Office of the Director of National Intelligence has provided a redacted version to Congress that members can bring to an open hearing, a spokesperson said.

The anticipation ahead of Maguire’s testimony was also amplified by the White House’s decision to release a transcript of Trump’s July 25 phone call with the leader of Ukraine that shows the President repeatedly pressed his counterpart to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden and his son. There is no evidence of wrongdoing by either Joe or Hunter Biden.