UNTV
Now playing
01:33
Greta Thunberg: You are failing us. How dare you
A Palestinian boy watches smoke billowing from buildings during Israeli airstrikes on the southern Gaza region of Khan Yunis, on May 11, 2021
MAHMOUD KHATAB/AFP/Getty Images
A Palestinian boy watches smoke billowing from buildings during Israeli airstrikes on the southern Gaza region of Khan Yunis, on May 11, 2021
Now playing
02:54
Israel ramps up airstrikes amid barrage of rockets from Gaza
Now playing
02:35
Dr. Fauci pushes back on Rand Paul: You are entirely incorrect
Cheney
CNN
Cheney
Now playing
06:16
Watch Liz Cheney speak ahead of vote to oust her
Now playing
03:59
FDA greenlights Pfzier Covid-19 vaccine for adolescents
CNN
Now playing
02:44
See exclusive look at US troops training European forces
Mandatory Credit: Photo by JIM LO SCALZO/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock (11895253o)
An image made with a drone shows fuel tanks at a Colonial Pipeline breakout station in Woodbine, Maryland, USA, 08 May 2021. A cyberattack forced the shutdown of 5,500 miles of Colonial Pipeline's sprawling interstate system, which carries gasoline and jet fuel from Texas to New York.
Cyberattack forces shutdown of Colonial Pipeline in US, Woodbine, USA - 08 May 2021
Jim Lo Scalzo/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock
Mandatory Credit: Photo by JIM LO SCALZO/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock (11895253o) An image made with a drone shows fuel tanks at a Colonial Pipeline breakout station in Woodbine, Maryland, USA, 08 May 2021. A cyberattack forced the shutdown of 5,500 miles of Colonial Pipeline's sprawling interstate system, which carries gasoline and jet fuel from Texas to New York. Cyberattack forces shutdown of Colonial Pipeline in US, Woodbine, USA - 08 May 2021
Now playing
02:12
Pipeline shutdown could push fuel prices higher
Now playing
04:24
Caitlyn Jenner reveals whether she voted for Trump in 2020
Authorities in Hangzhou's Fuyang district posted a video of a partially-sedated juvenile leopard after it was captured on May 8, 2021, having escaped a week earlier from a safari park in the eastern Chinese city.
Fuyang District Government
Authorities in Hangzhou's Fuyang district posted a video of a partially-sedated juvenile leopard after it was captured on May 8, 2021, having escaped a week earlier from a safari park in the eastern Chinese city.
Now playing
01:54
Zoo waited a week before alerting public 3 leopards were loose
ATLANTA - APRIL 30:  A Boeing 757 with a new Delta Airlines logo sits on the tarmac following the company's emergence from bankruptcy at Hartsfield Jackson International Airport April 30,2007 in Atlanta, Georgia. The 757 sports new branding that will appear on more than 900 planes, at airports and on advertising.  (Photo by Barry Williams/Getty Images) 757
Barry Williams/Getty Images North America/Getty Images
ATLANTA - APRIL 30: A Boeing 757 with a new Delta Airlines logo sits on the tarmac following the company's emergence from bankruptcy at Hartsfield Jackson International Airport April 30,2007 in Atlanta, Georgia. The 757 sports new branding that will appear on more than 900 planes, at airports and on advertising. (Photo by Barry Williams/Getty Images) 757
Now playing
01:45
Hear cockpit audio of Delta pilots reporting bird strike
screengrab palestinian
CNN
screengrab palestinian
Now playing
05:21
Palestinians fight eviction from homes in East Jerusalem
CNN
Now playing
01:38
Lawmakers push airlines to drop flight credit restrictions
ORLANDO, FLORIDA - FEBRUARY 28:  Former President Donald Trump addresses the Conservative Political Action Conference held in the Hyatt Regency on February 28, 2021 in Orlando, Florida. Begun in 1974, CPAC brings together conservative organizations, activists, and world leaders to discuss issues important to them. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Joe Raedle/Getty Images
ORLANDO, FLORIDA - FEBRUARY 28: Former President Donald Trump addresses the Conservative Political Action Conference held in the Hyatt Regency on February 28, 2021 in Orlando, Florida. Begun in 1974, CPAC brings together conservative organizations, activists, and world leaders to discuss issues important to them. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:15
Trump issues bizarre statement about Kentucky Derby winner
KRDO
Now playing
01:26
Six killed in shooting at Colorado birthday party
Justin Bamberg nr intv 05092021
CNN
Justin Bamberg nr intv 05092021
Now playing
04:05
Hear why this lawmaker is comparing his state to North Korea
Kevin McCarthy 05092021
Fox News
Kevin McCarthy 05092021
Now playing
03:30
Watch McCarthy confirm support for Stefanik for GOP leadership post
LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY - MAY 01: Medina Spirit #8, ridden by jockey John Velazquez, (R) crosses the finish line to win the 147th running of the Kentucky Derby ahead of Mandaloun #7, ridden by Florent Geroux, and Hot Rod Charlie #9 ridden by Flavien Prat , and Essential Quality #14, ridden by Luis Saez, at Churchill Downs on May 01, 2021 in Louisville, Kentucky. (Photo by Tim Nwachukwu/Getty Images)
Tim Nwachukwu/Getty Images
LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY - MAY 01: Medina Spirit #8, ridden by jockey John Velazquez, (R) crosses the finish line to win the 147th running of the Kentucky Derby ahead of Mandaloun #7, ridden by Florent Geroux, and Hot Rod Charlie #9 ridden by Flavien Prat , and Essential Quality #14, ridden by Luis Saez, at Churchill Downs on May 01, 2021 in Louisville, Kentucky. (Photo by Tim Nwachukwu/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:50
Kentucky Derby winner's trainer speaks out after doping allegations
(CNN) —  

Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg and 15 other children filed a complaint with the United Nations Monday alleging that five of the world’s major economies have violated their human rights by not taking adequate action to stop the unfolding climate crisis.

The complaint was filed a short time after Thunberg delivered an impassioned rebuke to world leaders at the UN Climate Action Summit.

“You have stolen my dreams and my childhood with your empty words — and yet, I’m one of the lucky ones,” Thunberg said Monday. “People are suffering, people are dying.”

The petition names five countries – Germany, France, Brazil, Argentina and Turkey – which they say have failed to uphold their obligations under the Convention on the Rights of the Child, a 30-year-old human rights treaty which is the most widely ratified in history.

The filing comes as the United Nations hosts a Climate Action Summit on the first day of its General Assembly, where dozens of world leaders are unveiling plans for reducing their countries’ carbon footprints.

At a press conference across the street from the summit, Thunberg and the other children joining the petition expressed their blunt frustration with the lack of urgency that world leaders have shown in fighting climate change.

“The message that we want to send is that we’ve had enough,” Thunberg said.

Carl Smith, a member of the indigenous Yupiaq tribe who lives in Akiak, Alaska, explained how warming has imperiled the subsistence hunting and fishing that his community depends on.

He blamed the inaction from leaders on greed.

“I think they’re acting slowly because they don’t want to lose money,” Smith said. “And I think they should go see what [climate change] is doing to little villages and cities.”

Youth climate activist Greta Thunberg and several other children announce the human rights complaint filed over five countries' handling of the climate crisis.
Drew Kann/CNN
Youth climate activist Greta Thunberg and several other children announce the human rights complaint filed over five countries' handling of the climate crisis.

In their filing, the children – who hail from 12 different nations – detail how they say their human rights have been violated.

They charge that the countries have not used their resources “to prevent the deadly and foreseeable consequences” of the current climate crisis, or cooperated effectively with other nations to address the problem.

They also call out each of the countries for their “inadequate” pledges to reduce greenhouse gases, saying that the cuts they have agreed to will not keep global temperatures from rising less than 2 degrees Celsius, the goal that was set by the 2015 Paris Climate Agreement. Scientists have warned that global warming of 2 degrees Celsius will result in more frequent and dangerous heat waves, rising sea levels and declining crop yields around the world.

The children also say that their lives have already been impacted by the climate crisis, and that their future livelihoods will be endangered as the impacts worsen.

The children do not ask for any monetary compensation. Instead, they ask that the countries immediately adjust their climate goals and work with other nations to address the crisis.

The complaint singles out those countries because they are among the 44 that have accepted the convention’s jurisdiction to hear complaints against them. They are also five of the world’s biggest historical and current emitters of greenhouse gases, which are causing the planet to warm and triggering a host of other alarming impacts, from raising sea levels to producing more intense storms.

Some of the world’s other top greenhouse gas emitters are notably not named in the complaint.

The United States – which has contributed more global warming-inducing carbon dioxide to the atmosphere than any other country – cannot be held in violation because it has not ratified the part of the treaty that allows children to seek justice for potential violations.

And China, which currently emits more greenhouse gases than any other country, has also not signed onto that portion of the treaty.