KMOV
Now playing
01:00
Woman fighting to keep her 3 emotional support monkeys
Yonkers Police Department/Instagram
Now playing
01:00
Cops rush to lift car off of trapped baby and mom
Now playing
00:39
'The Simpsons' is doing something it's never done before
NBC
Now playing
02:04
Intoxicated Seth Meyers has trouble with Lorde's real name
"CBS Sunday Morning"
Now playing
01:01
Why Matt Damon's daughter won't watch 'Good Will Hunting'
Instagram/@the.bam.bus
Now playing
01:20
Hear the BAM bus women describe their first meeting
Now playing
01:33
Dog was missing for 5 days. Then a neighbor heard whining behind a wall
Cape Wildlife Center
Now playing
01:55
Goose has an adorable reaction when mate has surgery
Dome Home
KARE
Dome Home
Now playing
01:37
$3 million domed home (that comes with indoor slide) goes up for sale
KMGH
Now playing
02:06
This bear had a bucket on its head for more than a week
Rachael Flores
Now playing
02:22
Employees go viral after resigning via Burger King sign
TikTok/GGGGoneyyyy
Now playing
01:31
Boutique mistakenly emails job applicant saying she's 'not that cute'
@SuperOllyT/Instagram
Now playing
01:04
See Jack Grealish's sweet moment with young fan
Aisha Nieves dog
Aisha Nieves
Aisha Nieves dog
Now playing
01:48
See moment woman reunites with dog she lost 2 years ago
Miami Dade Fire Rescue
Now playing
00:30
Cat reunites with family after Surfside condo collapse
WPBN/Twitter phil lewis
Now playing
01:36
Terrifying video shows festival ride malfunction
CNN —  

A Missouri woman is fighting to keep three monkeys she claims have provided her emotional support for years.

Texanne McBride-Teahan may lose possession of the animals after a neighbor in Creve Coeur, a suburb of St. Louis, spotted one monkey outside roughly a month after McBride-Teahan moved in, according to CNN affiliate KMOV.

Texanne McBride-Teahan says she has had emotional support monkeys for more than 20 years to help cope with PTSD.
Texanne McBride-Teahan
Texanne McBride-Teahan says she has had emotional support monkeys for more than 20 years to help cope with PTSD.

Monkeys are considered an “inherently dangerous animal” along with alligators, lions and pythons and are thus prohibited in residential areas, according to the City of Creve Coeur.

McBride-Teahan defended her monkeys – a black-capped capuchin named Paula, a patas named Zoey and a bonnet macaque named Kalie Anna – at a city council meeting September 9.

McBride-Teahan considers the monkeys emotional support animals and has a doctor’s letter and registration cards for them, she told CNN through Facebook. The animals help her cope with post-traumatic stress disorder related to an incident when she was a teenager, McBride-Teahan added.

Emotional support animals are not considered service animals under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). These sorts of animals provide comfort by being with a person but “because they have not been trained to perform a specific job or task, they do not qualify as service animals under the ADA,” the organization’s website states.

“However, some state or local governments have laws that allow people to take emotional support animals into public places,” the ADA adds.

McBride-Teahan is scheduled to appear in court over her monkeys in November, KMOV added.

“Monkeys are little. Less than 9 pounds. Pictures show they aren’t dangerous. To me they are life savers for my PTSD. We just want to live in peace,” McBride-Teahan told CNN.