John W. Weeks Bridge with clock tower over Charles River in Harvard University campus Boston
Shutterstock
John W. Weeks Bridge with clock tower over Charles River in Harvard University campus Boston
Now playing
02:14
Harvard freshman claims he was denied entry by immigration officials
Pharmacy student Jason Rodriguez prepares Pfizer vaccines at the Christine E. Lynn Rehabilitation Center in Miami, Florida on April 15, 2021. - Jackson Health System launched a Covid-19 vaccination initiative with colleges and universities in Miami-Dade County, which include Barry University, Florida International University, Florida Memorial University, Miami Dade College and University of Miami. Through this partnership, students who are Florida residents, as well as out-of-state and international students, will be allowed to sign up for a COVID vaccine appointment via our online portal. (Photo by CHANDAN KHANNA / AFP) (Photo by CHANDAN KHANNA/AFP via Getty Images)
CHANDAN KHANNA/AFP via Getty Images
Pharmacy student Jason Rodriguez prepares Pfizer vaccines at the Christine E. Lynn Rehabilitation Center in Miami, Florida on April 15, 2021. - Jackson Health System launched a Covid-19 vaccination initiative with colleges and universities in Miami-Dade County, which include Barry University, Florida International University, Florida Memorial University, Miami Dade College and University of Miami. Through this partnership, students who are Florida residents, as well as out-of-state and international students, will be allowed to sign up for a COVID vaccine appointment via our online portal. (Photo by CHANDAN KHANNA / AFP) (Photo by CHANDAN KHANNA/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
01:55
Covid-19 vaccine demand may soon reach a tipping point
Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) speaks to reporters as she arrives for the continuation of the Senate impeachment trial of President Donald Trump at the U.S. Capitol on January 29, 2020 in Washington, DC. The next phase of the trial, in which senators will be allowed to ask written questions, will extend into tomorrow. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
Mario Tama/Getty Images
Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) speaks to reporters as she arrives for the continuation of the Senate impeachment trial of President Donald Trump at the U.S. Capitol on January 29, 2020 in Washington, DC. The next phase of the trial, in which senators will be allowed to ask written questions, will extend into tomorrow. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
Now playing
04:08
Murkowski explains why she's voting for Biden nominee
pool
Now playing
04:20
Watch as judge reads out verdict in Chauvin trial
News 12 Long Island
Now playing
02:45
1 dead and 2 wounded in shooting at Long Island Stop & Shop
CNN
Now playing
01:33
Gupta on Covid-19: It doesn't seem to transmit well on surfaces
Now playing
05:01
'Did I strike a nerve?': Val Demings takes on Jim Jordan
NBC/Today Show
Now playing
02:27
'To a certain extent, nativist': Bush criticizes current GOP
NASA/JPL
Now playing
01:29
Watch the Ingenuity helicopter's first flight on Mars
AirTag
Apple
AirTag
Now playing
01:17
See AirTag, Apple's new device for tracking your lost stuff
Scene video following a crash involving a Tesla Saturday night in Spring, TX
Scott Engle
Scene video following a crash involving a Tesla Saturday night in Spring, TX
Now playing
01:09
Fatal Tesla crash had no one in the driver's seat, police say
alexey navalny russia health vladimir putin Kiley pkg intl ldn vpx_00012003.png
alexey navalny russia health vladimir putin Kiley pkg intl ldn vpx_00012003.png
Now playing
03:06
Navalny ally warns he is in dire health. Here's how he got here
DOGE COIN
Getty Images
DOGE COIN
Now playing
03:24
Dogecoin's value has skyrocketed this year
Fox News/CNN
Now playing
04:07
'Mean girl group chat': Keilar reacts to Trump's interview with Sean Hannity
Reuters
Now playing
02:14
Military spokesman announces transitional president in Chad
WCCO
Now playing
01:27
Shots fired at Minnesota National Guard and police team
CNN
Now playing
02:10
Fauci: We'll get Johnson and Johnson vaccine back 'in some manner'
(CNN) —  

The Harvard University student who was previously denied entry to the United States is now on campus for the school’s 2019 academic year, Harvard spokeswoman Rachael Dane said.

US Customs and Border Protection previously said Ismail Ajjawi was “deemed inadmissible to the United States based on information discovered during the CBP inspection.”

In a statement to CNN Monday, CBP said it “can confirm that on Monday September 2, Ismail Ajjawi overcame all grounds of inadmissibility and was admitted into the United States as a student on a F1 visa.” The agency did not provide details on how the case was resolved.

In a statement, Ajjawi’s attorney Albert Mokhiber called it “a classic sad tale with an exceptionally unique happy ending.” He thanked Harvard, the nonprofit organization AMIDEAST, the US Embassy in Beirut and the “outpouring of international media and popular support.”

“We are pleased that Ismail’s Harvard dream will come true after all. Ismail is a bright young man whose hard work, intelligence and drive enabled him to overcome the challenges that Palestinian refugee youth continue to face in order to earn a scholarship,” said Theodore Kattouf, the president and CEO of AMIDEAST, which awarded Ajjawi a scholarship.

When Ajjawi was initially denied entry into the US, Harvard’s newspaper, The Harvard Crimson, reported he was a “17-year-old Palestinian resident of Tyre, Lebanon.”

The Crimson’s report quoted from a written statement attributed to Ajjawi, in which the incoming student described his encounter with immigration officials at Boston’s Logan Airport.

According to the Crimson, Ajjawi said he was detained for eight hours before being turned away. During that time, he alleges, an immigration official asked him to unlock his phone and laptop and proceeded to search them for five hours. The Crimson said he was then asked questions about his friends’ social media activities.

According to the Crimson, Ajjawi alleged he was told that there were “political points of view that oppose the US” expressed by people he follows on social media.

After he was questioned, the Crimson reported, his visa was revoked and he was sent back to Lebanon.

The development came more than a month after Harvard’s President, Lawrence Bacow, wrote an open letter to Secretary of State Michael Pompeo and Acting Secretary of Homeland Security Kevin McAleenan expressing concern over the administration’s immigration policies and their effect on Harvard’s academic programs.

“Students report difficulties getting initial visas – from delays to denials,” Bacow wrote in July. International students and scholars, he wrote at the time, “are not just participants in the life of the university; they are essential to it.”

He criticized the visa and immigration process as “unpredictable and uncertain.”

CNN’s Madeleine Thompson contributed to this report.