Summer isn't a break for kids or parents

"For grown-ups, summer is the antithesis of freedom," Elissa Strauss writes.

(CNN)As my son's camp brochures told it, summer's appeal remains as timeless as popsicles and dappled light. It's the season of freedom; a time to commune with Mother Nature and our unfettered selves.

Conveniently left out of these bucolic scenes were us, his parents, hollow-eyed and deflated from the Herculean effort it takes to get kids to camp today.
For grown-ups, summer is the antithesis of freedom, a season we look forward to ending once it begins. It marks the end of having somewhere safe and free to leave our children during the day while we work; the end of a reliable schedule that has wormed its way into acceptance by our supervisors and colleagues; and the end of reliable schedule that has wormed its way into acceptance by our change-averse children. Only the return to school can save us from this mess.
Summer break is a system built for another time, during which a 10-week break could be slotted somewhere between "opportunity" and "minor inconvenience" for parents. But changes to the way we work and play have made the season untenable for many.