PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
02:09
NYPD commissioner: I'm scared this will happen again
PHOTO: CBS Evening News with Norah O'Donnell
Now playing
02:14
Governor Cuomo accuser Charlotte Bennett speaks out
In this Dec. 1, 2020 file photo, Chairman of the Federal Reserve Jerome Powell appears before the Senate Banking Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington.  Powell told Congress on Wednesday, Feb. 24, 2021,  that the central bank will not begin raising interest rates until the Fed believes it has reached its goals on maximum employment  and warned that many people in the hardest hit industries will likely need to find different jobs.  (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, Pool, File)
PHOTO: Susan Walsh/AP
In this Dec. 1, 2020 file photo, Chairman of the Federal Reserve Jerome Powell appears before the Senate Banking Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington. Powell told Congress on Wednesday, Feb. 24, 2021, that the central bank will not begin raising interest rates until the Fed believes it has reached its goals on maximum employment and warned that many people in the hardest hit industries will likely need to find different jobs. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, Pool, File)
Now playing
02:18
Jerome Powell: US economy 'some time' away from full recovery
A customer wears a face mask while shopping for flowers displayed for sale from a wholesale merchant ahead of the Valentine's Day holiday at the Southern California Flower Market on February 12, 2021 in Los Angeles, California. - While some florists note an increased demand for socially distant gifts, the Covid-19 pandemic has impacted global supply chains and shut down most large events including weddings where flowers are popular. The Valentine's Day and Mother's Day holidays are historically the two busiest days of the year for floral businesses. (Photo by Patrick T. FALLON / AFP) (Photo by PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images)
PHOTO: Patrick T. Fallon/AFP
A customer wears a face mask while shopping for flowers displayed for sale from a wholesale merchant ahead of the Valentine's Day holiday at the Southern California Flower Market on February 12, 2021 in Los Angeles, California. - While some florists note an increased demand for socially distant gifts, the Covid-19 pandemic has impacted global supply chains and shut down most large events including weddings where flowers are popular. The Valentine's Day and Mother's Day holidays are historically the two busiest days of the year for floral businesses. (Photo by Patrick T. FALLON / AFP) (Photo by PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
02:39
States rolling back Covid-19 safety measures as cases continue to rise
PHOTO: CBS' 60 Minutes+/Getty Images
Now playing
01:45
'QAnon Shaman' says he has one regret about January 6
psaki
PHOTO: CNN
psaki
Now playing
00:56
Psaki fires back at Trump testing czar over vaccine claims
Now playing
02:30
Alabama governor explains why she's ending mask mandate
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
01:35
See what security looks like outside US Capitol
PHOTO: Getty Images/CNN
Now playing
02:18
Bash: This is why key GOP senator is fighting Biden's stimulus
PHOTO: YouTube/Everyday Astronaut
Now playing
01:19
Watch SpaceX Mars prototype rocket nail landing, explode on pad
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 16:  Physician to U.S. President Donald Trump Dr. Ronny Jackson listens during the daily White House press briefing at the James Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House January 16, 2018 in Washington, DC. Dr. Jackson discussed the details of President TrumpÕs physical check-up from last week.  (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Alex Wong/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 16: Physician to U.S. President Donald Trump Dr. Ronny Jackson listens during the daily White House press briefing at the James Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House January 16, 2018 in Washington, DC. Dr. Jackson discussed the details of President TrumpÕs physical check-up from last week. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Now playing
03:14
DOD releases scathing review of former White House physician
PHOTO: CNN/Getty
Now playing
02:10
'Highly misleading at best': Dale reacts to Pence's op-ed
PHOTO: Gov. Cuomo's office
Now playing
03:35
Gov. Andrew Cuomo addresses women's allegations
Commanding General District of Columbia National Guard Major General William J. Walker testifies before the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs/Rules and Administration hearing to examine the January 6, 2021 attack on the US Capitol on Capitol Hill on March 3, 2021 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Greg Nash / POOL / AFP) (Photo by GREG NASH/POOL/AFP via Getty Images)
PHOTO: GREG NASH/POOL/AFP via Getty Images
Commanding General District of Columbia National Guard Major General William J. Walker testifies before the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs/Rules and Administration hearing to examine the January 6, 2021 attack on the US Capitol on Capitol Hill on March 3, 2021 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Greg Nash / POOL / AFP) (Photo by GREG NASH/POOL/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
03:01
DC National Guard commander: 'Unusual' Pentagon restrictions slowed response to Capitol riot
Supporters of President Donald Trump hold up their phones with messages referring to the QAnon conspiracy theory at a campaign rally at Las Vegas Convention Center on February 21, 2020 in Las Vegas, Nevada.
PHOTO: Mario Tama/Getty Images
Supporters of President Donald Trump hold up their phones with messages referring to the QAnon conspiracy theory at a campaign rally at Las Vegas Convention Center on February 21, 2020 in Las Vegas, Nevada.
Now playing
03:00
Hear why QAnon supporters believe Trump will be president on March 4th
FBI Director Christopher Wray testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on the January 6th insurrection, in the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC on March 2, 2021. (Photo by MANDEL NGAN / POOL / AFP) (Photo by MANDEL NGAN/POOL/AFP via Getty Images)
PHOTO: MANDEL NGAN/POOL/AFP via Getty Images
FBI Director Christopher Wray testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on the January 6th insurrection, in the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC on March 2, 2021. (Photo by MANDEL NGAN / POOL / AFP) (Photo by MANDEL NGAN/POOL/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
02:55
Watch FBI director debunk conspiracy theories pushed by Trump supporters
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 10: Neera Tanden, nominee for Director of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), testifies at her confirmation hearing before the Senate Budget Committee on February 10, 2021 at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, DC. Tanden helped found the Center for American Progress, a policy research and advocacy organization and has held senior advisory positions in Democratic politics since the Clinton administration. (Photo by Anna Moneymaker-Pool/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Anna Moneymaker-Pool/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 10: Neera Tanden, nominee for Director of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), testifies at her confirmation hearing before the Senate Budget Committee on February 10, 2021 at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, DC. Tanden helped found the Center for American Progress, a policy research and advocacy organization and has held senior advisory positions in Democratic politics since the Clinton administration. (Photo by Anna Moneymaker-Pool/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:33
Neera Tanden releases statement on pulling her nomination
(CNN) —  

Eileen Echeverria says she watched her brother, New York police officer Robert Echeverria, deteriorate over the last eight years.

Echeverria said she told the department her brother was a danger to himself and others multiple times. Twice, she says, the department took his weapons away. Twice, she says, they gave them back.

Her brother had called and said he’d kill himself before, she told CNN on Monday, but the last time was different because he was unraveling and in financial ruin.

Officer Echeverria, 56, a 25-year veteran of the force and member of the Strategic Response Group – an NYPD rapid-reaction unit – died by suicide Wednesday from a self-inflicted gunshot wound, law enforcement sources told CNN.

“I watched my brother deteriorate to a point that I begged NYPD to help him and get him back and they didn’t,” she said. “So I’m gonna remember my brother from 10 years ago and not the one I saw last. That’s what I’m going to remember about my brother, he deserves that.”

’He is unraveling’

In an email sent by Eileen Echeverria to the NYPD’s Internal Affairs Bureau – and provided by Echeverria to CNN – she refers to her brother as “suicidal,” adding, “I really am concerned about guns in the house.” She asked the department to contact her.

In an interview with CNN, she said she spoke with internal affairs officers. “I called and said, ‘my brother is threatening to kill me or himself. He is unraveling.’”

Her efforts led to a psychiatric evaluation, she said, during which her brother’s guns were taken away. Echeverria said they were returned shortly afterward.

“Two days later, he had his guns back,” she said. “Two months later, he’s dead.”

The June call to IAB was not Echeverria’s first. She said she called the department in 2012 after an altercation between her brother and his son. Officer Echeverria’s guns were taken away for a month that time, she said.

“I’ve called half a dozen times since 2012,” she said.

The NYPD did not address Echeverria’s claims specifically when asked about them Friday, but Sgt. Mary Frances O’Donnell, a police spokeswoman, told CNN that the department is investigating.

’The Rubber Gun Squad’

Echeverria said her brother was worried that seeking help would get him assigned to desk work – what he called “the rubber gun squad” – and mean the end of any overtime hours, exacerbating what she characterized as his difficult financial situation.

“At one point my brother was afraid to go to his psychiatrist through his health insurance plan because the NYPD was going to find out,” Echeverria said Monday.

That’s precisely the stigma that the department has been trying to address. Speaking in June after the sixth NYPD suicide of the year, Chief of Department Terence Monahan said he wanted to provide assistance to officers with an eye toward getting them back on the job.

“We have to look at, how do we get them back to service, get them back out there, doing what they signed on to do, doing what they love to do?” he said.

Asked at the time about officers who feared that seeking help would mean losing their jobs, Monahan said, “Well, if you come here today, you’ll have it (your job) tomorrow.”

’Reach out for help’

Echeverria’s death came less than two days after the department’s eighth suicide. Following that death, Monahan took to Twitter in what has now become a somber recurrence, sharing phone numbers for officer helplines and department chaplains.

“Please reach out for help – on the job or off,” he tweeted. “You’re never alone.”

Echeverria said she doubted officers like her brother would pick up the phone to call the department for help. She said all officers should have mandatory mental health check-ins.

Since the spate of suicides this summer, the NYPD has been developing a plan to help troubled officers. Eight hundred members of executive New York Police Department staff will begin retraining this month with experts on mental health, stress and suicide, with the goal to eventually train the entire department, Police Commissioner James O’Neill told CNN during a recent interview.

NYPD staffers also went to Los Angeles to observe its police department peer support system, which includes clinicians who spend time with officers, and psychologists who make rounds, visiting every command.

The goal is to have a peer representative in every precinct and every command that’s specifically trained to help an officer step back from the brink and find a trained professional to help.

Echeverria said she hoped speaking publicly about her brother’s suicide would help save the lives of other officers who might be contemplating suicide.

“There are nine officers dead, and many more before this (year),” she said. “This is 1,000% avoidable.”

CNN’s Mark Morales, Chelsea J. Carter and Amir Vera contributed to this report