WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 13:  U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) speaks during a rally at Howard University May 13, 2019 in Washington, DC. The Sunrise Movement held an event for the final stop of the "Road to a Green New Deal" tour to "explore what the pain of the climate crisis looks like in D.C. and for the country and what the promise of the Green New Deal means."  (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Alex Wong/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 13: U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) speaks during a rally at Howard University May 13, 2019 in Washington, DC. The Sunrise Movement held an event for the final stop of the "Road to a Green New Deal" tour to "explore what the pain of the climate crisis looks like in D.C. and for the country and what the promise of the Green New Deal means." (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:49
Sanders: Harris' plan is not 'Medicare for All'
Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA) speaks during a press conference outside the U.S. Capitol on February 5, 2021 in Washington, DC. The House voted 230 to 199 on Friday evening to remove Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA) from committee assignments over her remarks about QAnon and other conspiracy theories.
Drew Angerer/Getty Images
Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA) speaks during a press conference outside the U.S. Capitol on February 5, 2021 in Washington, DC. The House voted 230 to 199 on Friday evening to remove Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA) from committee assignments over her remarks about QAnon and other conspiracy theories.
Now playing
03:20
Marjorie Taylor Greene lashes out at media after backlash over controversial caucus
AP
Now playing
03:16
Maxine Waters: Jim Jordan is a bully and I shut him down
US Representative Marjorie Taylor Greene, Republican of Georgia, leaves her office on Capitol Hill on February 4, 2021 in Washington, DC.
NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images
US Representative Marjorie Taylor Greene, Republican of Georgia, leaves her office on Capitol Hill on February 4, 2021 in Washington, DC.
Now playing
03:51
Marjorie Taylor Greene launching 'America First' caucus
US President Joe Biden delivers remarks on Russia at the White House in Washington, DC on April 15, 2021. - The United States announced sanctions and the expulsion of 10 Russian diplomats Thursday in retaliation for what Washington says is the Kremlin's US election interference, a massive cyberattack and other hostile activity.
JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images
US President Joe Biden delivers remarks on Russia at the White House in Washington, DC on April 15, 2021. - The United States announced sanctions and the expulsion of 10 Russian diplomats Thursday in retaliation for what Washington says is the Kremlin's US election interference, a massive cyberattack and other hostile activity.
Now playing
02:22
White House backtracks on refugees decision after criticism
Biden speaks from the Treaty Room in the White House on April 14, 2021 in Washington, DC.
Andrew Harnik/Pool/Getty Images
Biden speaks from the Treaty Room in the White House on April 14, 2021 in Washington, DC.
Now playing
02:44
'National embarrassment': Biden reacts to mass shootings
MOSCOW, RUSSIA - APRIL 15:  Russian President Vladimir Putin (L) talks to talks to Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov during a meeting with Uzbekistan President Islam Karimov in the Kremlin on April 15, 2013 in in Moscow, Russia. Karimov is on a state visit to Russia. (Photo by Sasha Mordovets/Getty Images)
Sasha Mordovets/Getty Images
MOSCOW, RUSSIA - APRIL 15: Russian President Vladimir Putin (L) talks to talks to Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov during a meeting with Uzbekistan President Islam Karimov in the Kremlin on April 15, 2013 in in Moscow, Russia. Karimov is on a state visit to Russia. (Photo by Sasha Mordovets/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:07
Russia to expel 10 US diplomats in 'tit-for-tat response' to Biden sanctions
Now playing
03:10
Avlon: Here's what we know 100 days since the Capitol riot
A Russian flag flies next to the US embassy building in Moscow on October 22, 2018. - US national security advisor John Bolton is in Moscow holding meetings with senior Russian officials following Washington's weekend announcement of withdrawal from the Cold War-era Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty, known as the INF. (Photo by Mladen ANTONOV / AFP)        (Photo credit should read MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP via Getty Images)
Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images
A Russian flag flies next to the US embassy building in Moscow on October 22, 2018. - US national security advisor John Bolton is in Moscow holding meetings with senior Russian officials following Washington's weekend announcement of withdrawal from the Cold War-era Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty, known as the INF. (Photo by Mladen ANTONOV / AFP) (Photo credit should read MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
02:17
Political scientist: US-Russia relations are in the toilet
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 13: Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham (D-NM) speaks during a news conference on immigration to condemn the Trump Administration's "zero tolerance" immigration policy, outside the US Capitol on June 13, 2018 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Toya Sarno Jordan/Getty Images)
Toya Sarno Jordan/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 13: Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham (D-NM) speaks during a news conference on immigration to condemn the Trump Administration's "zero tolerance" immigration policy, outside the US Capitol on June 13, 2018 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Toya Sarno Jordan/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:39
Governor settles with former campaign staffer who accused her of sexual mistreatment
pool/cnn
Now playing
01:56
Hear what Dr. Gupta said when Cruz went maskless before
Now playing
02:30
Biden's decision to withdraw from Afghanistan is personal for this lawmaker
President Joe Biden speaks from the Treaty Room in the White House on Wednesday, April 14, 2021, about the withdrawal of the remainder of U.S. troops from Afghanistan.=
Andrew Harnik/AP
President Joe Biden speaks from the Treaty Room in the White House on Wednesday, April 14, 2021, about the withdrawal of the remainder of U.S. troops from Afghanistan.=
Now playing
02:10
Why Biden made his Afghanistan announcement in this particular room
U.S. President Joe Biden speaks from the Treaty Room in the White House about the withdrawal of U.S. troops from Afghanistan on April 14, 2021 in Washington, DC. President Biden announced his plans to pull all remaining U.S. troops out of Afghanistan by September 11, 2021 in a final step towards ending America's longest war.
Andrew Harnik/Pool/Getty Images
U.S. President Joe Biden speaks from the Treaty Room in the White House about the withdrawal of U.S. troops from Afghanistan on April 14, 2021 in Washington, DC. President Biden announced his plans to pull all remaining U.S. troops out of Afghanistan by September 11, 2021 in a final step towards ending America's longest war.
Now playing
01:03
Biden: It's time to end the forever war
Kinzinger
CNN
Kinzinger
Now playing
05:56
What Republican lawmaker fears after US troops leave Afghanistan
Rep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fla., questions witnesses during a House Armed Services Committee hearing on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, April 14, 2021, in Washington.
Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP
Rep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fla., questions witnesses during a House Armed Services Committee hearing on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, April 14, 2021, in Washington.
Now playing
02:59
Women detail late-night parties with Gaetz
(CNN) —  

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders on Monday stressed the differences between his single-payer health care plan and a new proposal from Sen. Kamala Harris, labeling her approach “not ’Medicare for All.’ ”

Harris’ plan, which was released Monday, would put the US on the path toward a government-backed health insurance system over the course of 10 years but stops short of completely eliminating private insurance. The future of health care in America has marked a rare point of difference in the crowded 2020 Democratic field.

“Well, first of all, I like Kamala. She’s a friend of mine, but her plan is not Medicare for All,” Sanders told CNN’s Jake Tapper on “The Lead,” hosted from Detroit on Monday. “What Medicare for All understands is that health care is a human right and the function of a sane health care system is not to make sure that insurance companies and drug companies make tens of billions of dollars in profit.”

“The function of Medicare for All is to guarantee health care to all people as soon as possible,” Sanders continued.

Speaking to Harris’ goal to achieve Medicare for All in 10 years, Sanders said, “We think that four years is as long as it should be, not 10 years.”

“And that’s one of the reasons I disagree with Sen. Harris,” he added.

Members of the Sanders campaign flooded the airwaves in defense of Medicare for All and against Harris’ plan on Monday.

“Unfortunately, I think we’ve seen two major changes,” Faiz Shakir, the campaign manager told CNN’s Poppy Harlow on “Newsroom.”

“One is she’s decided she would like to privatize Medicare. She would like to introduce more insurance companies into Medicare. That introduces more corporate greed and profit seeking into Medicare. The second thing she wants to do is phase it in over 10 years, not in one term of a presidency, not in two, but that you would have to wait 10 years for people who have been struggling.”

Shakir pointed out that Harris has not signed on to the pledge put forth by the Sanders campaign to reject donations from pharmaceutical executives as another sign that her campaign does not have its priorities right on health care.

“I don’t believe Kamala Harris said she would take that pledge,” Shakir said. “What that means is are you willing to fight these health insurance companies and pharmaceutical companies when you’re in the Oval Office. And I don’t think we know that. I don’t think we have confidence. And obviously the plan here is suggesting that there’s some concern over taking them on.”

Josh Orton, the Sanders campaign’s policy director, told CNN, “It’s bad policy, bad politics, and compared to Medicare for All it vastly expands the ability for private insurance corporations to profit from overbilling and denying care to vulnerable patients who need it the most.”

On the role private insurance companies play in Harris’ plan, the Sanders campaign’s chief of staff Ari Rabin-Havt, told CNN, “It would give a lot of money and a lot of power to private insurance companies over people’s health care, and that’s not what we believe in.”

Harris’ proposal seeks to occupy a middle ground between Medicare for All champions like Sanders and Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren and more moderate voices on health care like former Vice President Joe Biden, who has advocated for reforms to the current system.

Harris wrote in a post outlining her plan that Medicare would “set the rules of the road.”

“We will allow private insurers to offer Medicare plans as part of this system that adhere to strict Medicare requirements on costs and benefits,” she said. “Medicare will set the rules of the road for these plans, including price and quality, and private insurance companies will play by those rules, not the other way around.”

Warren told CNN Monday that while she hadn’t “seen the details” of Harris’ plan, she emphasized her support for Medicare for All.

“I’m not here to attack other Democrats. I’m here to talk about what I believe in,” she said. “And as I’ve tried to make clear, I believe that health care is a basic human right. And I will fight for basic human rights. That means Medicare for all as the best possible way to give us maximum coverage at the lowest possible cost.”

Sanders has remained an unwavering voice for Medicare for All as fellow 2020 Democratic candidates have launched escalating attacks on his approach.

“Medicare for All critics tell us that Americans just love their private health insurance companies,” Sanders said earlier this month. “You know what? I have never met one person who loves their insurance company.”

CNN’s Kyung Lah, Tami Luhby and Gregory Krieg contributed to this report.