Arch-Brexiteer Jacob Rees-Mogg issues stringent style guide to staff

Conservative Party politician Jacob Rees-Mogg has issued a strict style guide to his office staff.

London (CNN)Jacob Rees-Mogg, the arch Brexiteer and newly appointed UK Leader of the House of Commons, has commenced his Cabinet career by issuing a strict style guide to his new office.

The Conservative Party politician, who is an Old Etonian and stickler for tradition, has outlined an extensive list of words that his staff are banned from using in correspondences with his constituents and fellow MPs. The style guide was originally revealed by CNN affiliate ITV.
Among his maligned lexicon, are the words "ongoing," "speculate" and "meet with." Staff are equally obliged to use imperial measurements, and a double space after a full stop is imperative.
Yet perhaps most archaically, Rees-Mogg requires all non-titled males to be referred to as "esquire" as a sign of respect.
    Rees-Mogg requires his staff to use imperial measurements at all times, and refer to non-titled males as 'esquire'.
    Rees-Mogg, who was appointed to his first position in government this week by Britain's new Prime Minister Boris Johnson, has said the rules are by no means a new tradition and have been in regular use by his constituency office during his time as the MP for North East Somerset.
    "They asked how I like my letters done and I said: 'Well I have got a list of how things are done in my office upstairs," he said according to the Daily Telegraph, referring to his recent appointment.
    "I had it brought down from my House of Commons office. It's just a thing listing banned words, which are sort of New Labour words like 'unacceptable.'
    "If you mean something's wrong, say it's wrong. And 'impacted' -- unless it's a wisdom tooth. A sort of style guide. And people must be correctly addressed. I always put esquire to a male constituent."
    Rees-Mogg was appointed Leader of the House of Commons by Britain's new prime minister Boris Johnson.
    Despite the seemingly antiquated nature of Rees-Mogg's requests, fellow politicians have come to his defense.
    "In fairness, these are largely rules I apply," fellow Conservative politician Simon Clarke wrote on Twitter. "Double spacing after full stops. Esq. Avoid the dreaded "meet with." Somewhat sensations coverage of what is in essence good house style."
    Rees-Mogg has garnered the nickname "Honorable member for the 18th century" for his use of archaic English and love of double-breasted suits.
    He is an avid history fan and recently published a book paying tribute to his idols of the Victorian age, entitled "The Victorians: 12 Titans who Forged Britain."
    The new Leader of the Commons is a fervent Brexiteer and played a central role in the downfall of Britain's former prime minister, Theresa May.
      As chairman of the European Research Group, a body of Brexiteer Conservative politicians, he repeatedly urged MPs to vote against May's Brexit deal.
      He also repeatedly called for her resignation and helped instigate a vote of no confidence in her leadership in January.