Former Special Counsel Robert Mueller listens as he testifies before the House Select Committee on Intelligence hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, July 24, 2019. (Photo by SAUL LOEB / AFP)        (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
SAUL LOEB/AFP/AFP/Getty Images
Former Special Counsel Robert Mueller listens as he testifies before the House Select Committee on Intelligence hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, July 24, 2019. (Photo by SAUL LOEB / AFP) (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:25
Mueller's testimony: Sticking to 'the report' (2019)
Getty Images
Now playing
03:25
See top Trump DOJ official's two-word response to election probe request
US President Joe Biden gives a press conference after the NATO summit at the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) headquarters in Brussels, on June 14, 2021.
OLIVIER HOSLET/AFP/POOL/Getty Images
US President Joe Biden gives a press conference after the NATO summit at the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) headquarters in Brussels, on June 14, 2021.
Now playing
01:25
Biden calls on foreign leaders to protect against 'phony populism'
CNN
Now playing
01:39
Honig: Emails show Trump had his enablers
Senate TV
Now playing
05:54
McConnell dismisses Trump DOJ's secret seizure of data
POOL
Now playing
02:47
'Surprise is an understatement': Reporter on lawmaker's apology
WAVE
Now playing
01:52
McConnell vows to deny Biden SCOTUS pick if GOP wins back Senate
Now playing
02:31
Merrick Garland announces plan to combat domestic terrorism
arizona election audit murray ebof vpx_00001313.png
arizona election audit murray ebof vpx_00001313.png
Now playing
02:19
Ballot maker: We've never seen an audit conducted this way
CNN
Now playing
02:30
Rep. Stewart makes false claim about Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene
UNITED STATES - JUNE 9: Attorney General Merrick Garland arrives for the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies hearing on the proposed budget for fiscal year 2022 for the Department of Justice on Wednesday, June 9, 2021. (Photo by Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call via AP Images)
Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call/AP
UNITED STATES - JUNE 9: Attorney General Merrick Garland arrives for the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies hearing on the proposed budget for fiscal year 2022 for the Department of Justice on Wednesday, June 9, 2021. (Photo by Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call via AP Images)
Now playing
02:34
Merrick Garland releases statement regarding leak probes
Now playing
08:21
'Very offensive': Mom of US Marine jailed in Russia reacts to Putin's comment
Now playing
02:38
CNN's Barbara Starr: No idea why the DOJ snuck into my life
NYC Mayor's Office/CNN
Now playing
06:15
Keilar: NYC's mayor has zero you-know-whats to give
Fox News/CNN
Now playing
01:21
Texas lawmaker reacts to Lara Trump telling border citizens to 'arm up'
CNN
Now playing
03:45
Avlon: Now America's allies are breathing a bit easier

Editor’s Note: Drew Westen is a professor in the Departments of Psychology and Psychiatry at Emory University, and founder of Westen Strategies, a strategic messaging firm. He is the author of “The Political Brain: The Role of Emotion in Deciding the Fate of the Nation,” and is working on his next book, “What’s Left?” The opinions expressed in this commentary are his own. View more opinion at CNN.

CNN —  

Democrats fell all over themselves at Wednesday’s televised House hearings to thank the former special counsel Robert Mueller – deservedly – for his service as a decorated Marine, a career public servant and a patriot, while Republicans impugned his integrity and that of his investigation and his team.

Drew Westen
Drew Westen

Although Mueller showed loyalty to his team, he did not show loyalty to his country. Whether he was cognitively impaired (as he seemed not to know the names or positions of some of his key witnesses, notably the former Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski) or had simply misplaced his spine, he appeared to be lost. Why the man who showed such courage on the battlefield showed such timidity and hesitation Wednesday, requiring members of Congress to read him a bedtime story because he would not even read his own words aloud, is unclear.

Americans needed a definitive, plain-language, nonlegalistic statement from Mueller about one and only one question: Did the President and his henchmen and women commit a crime?

Did his participation in the dissemination of information from emails stolen by Russians and leaked by Wikileaks, with Trump’s encouragement, violate campaign laws? Or was it treason, namely helping a hostile foreign power – our chief adversary over 70 years – attack our bedrock democratic institution, elections? Did Trump commit any of the 10 counts of obstruction Mueller laid out in his report to cover up those or any other crimes? And did he commit any other felonies, such as witness intimidation, as he had clearly indicated in the report?

If the answer to any of those questions had been an unequivocal yes, the House would have been required under the Constitution to hold impeachment hearings. If the answer were indeterminate, the House might still hold hearings to question the witnesses themselves, so it could decide, as the public watched, whether this was a “witch hunt” or a legitimate investigation. If the answer were no, Democrats might disagree, but they would better spend their time electing a Democrat in 2020.

Instead of answering any of the questions we Americans had hired him to answer, Mueller pleaded “no contest.” This was not a “neutral” political move. It provided Republicans good reason to argue that the investigation was a two-year, multimillion-dollar waste of time.

Sure, his investigation put a half-dozen other people in prison for one crime or another, but Mueller chose to immunize the person who may well be the fulcrum for those crimes, allowing him to remain in the highest position in the land without a trial.

And sure, other state and federal prosecutors may ultimately indict Trump, in or out of office, or perhaps, like Nixon, he will face a reckoning a year or two after he is re-elected.

But as a taxpaying Democrat, as of this moment, I have to agree with Republicans that this was a waste of my time and money – not, as they would argue, because the Mueller report made no determination about “collusion” or obstruction. It was a waste of time and money because we hired a prosecutor who, after agreeing to serve his country one last time, chose to go missing in action.