An Alien sculpture lines the side of the road in the town of Baker, California, also known as the 'Gateway to Area 51' on March 4, 2019.
Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images
An Alien sculpture lines the side of the road in the town of Baker, California, also known as the 'Gateway to Area 51' on March 4, 2019.
Now playing
01:01
What we know about Area 51
CNN
Now playing
02:53
See what life was like in the Olympic Village in 1984
Emilia Clarke Tonight Show Good 4 u accents orig AH _00000000.png
Emilia Clarke Tonight Show Good 4 u accents orig AH _00000000.png
Now playing
00:57
Emilia Clarke's rapid-fire accents blow away Jimmy Fallon
Fox News
Now playing
02:31
Tucker Carlson insults Capitol police officer
Now playing
02:29
'Outrageous' used car prices amid highest inflation in 13 years
Now playing
04:56
How these startups are tackling high drug costs in the US
Now playing
04:41
How facial recognition went from bad TV to Big Brother
Now playing
02:54
Heart Aerospace CEO: We plan to fly electric planes by 2026
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 09: Elon Musk, founder and chief engineer of SpaceX speaks at the 2020 Satellite Conference and Exhibition March 9, 2020 in Washington, DC. Musk answered a range of questions relating to SpaceX projects during his appearance at the conference. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
Win McNamee/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 09: Elon Musk, founder and chief engineer of SpaceX speaks at the 2020 Satellite Conference and Exhibition March 9, 2020 in Washington, DC. Musk answered a range of questions relating to SpaceX projects during his appearance at the conference. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
Now playing
04:19
Bitcoin and crypto's 'Elon Musk problem'
Fox News
Now playing
02:21
Sean Hannity makes an unexpected statement live on Fox News
Now playing
03:40
See the moment Blue Origin spacecraft lifts off
Ben and Jerry's ice cream is stored in a cooler at an event where founders Jerry Greenfield and Ben Cohen gave away ice cream to bring attention to police reform at the U.S. Supreme Court on May 20, 2021 in Washington, DC. The two are urging the ending of police qualified immunity.
Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images
Ben and Jerry's ice cream is stored in a cooler at an event where founders Jerry Greenfield and Ben Cohen gave away ice cream to bring attention to police reform at the U.S. Supreme Court on May 20, 2021 in Washington, DC. The two are urging the ending of police qualified immunity.
Now playing
02:25
Ben & Jerry's will stop selling ice cream in Palestinian territories
NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS
Now playing
01:11
See mesmerizing images of Jupiter and its biggest moon
CNN/John General/Atom Smasher
Now playing
04:04
Here's everything you need to know about ransomware
Dome Home
KARE
Dome Home
Now playing
01:37
$3 million domed home (that comes with indoor slide) goes up for sale
Fremantle USA/Syco Entertainment/NBC/Warner Bros.
Now playing
01:55
'Police Academy' actor wows 'America's Got Talent' judges
CNN —  

It’s all fun and games until you accidentally incite a giant mob to raid a top-secret military base.

The internet has been buzzing with excitement about a Facebook event entitled, “Storm Area 51, They Can’t Stop All of Us,” with 1.6 million people having clicked “Going” and another 1.2 million have indicating they’re “Interested” on the event page.

Hitherto cloaked in mystery, the man behind the legend has stepped forward.

On June 27, Matty Roberts, who lives in California, created the Facebook page as a joke, not realizing that millions would rally behind his battle cry to “see them aliens” at the Air Force facility in Nevada.

Most, but not all, knew the desert congregation scheduled for September 20 was in jest, as the page included instructions such as “If we naruto run, we can move faster than their bullets. Let’s see them aliens.” (For the uninitiated, “naruto run” is a reference to a type of running in a popular anime show.)

The creator is afraid the FBI may knock on his door

“I waited for like three days and there were like 40 people and then it just completely took off out of nowhere,” he told CNN affiliate KLAS-TV in Las Vegas. “It was pretty wild.”

Roberts told KLAS he’d declined interviews as interest was skyrocketing because he thought if he revealed his identity he might have FBI agents showing up at his door.

“I was just like, the FBI’s going to show up at my house and it got a little spooky from there,” he said.

Roberts said he came up with the idea for the meme page after podcaster Joe Rogan interviewed Area 51 whistleblower Bob Lazar and filmmaker Jeremy Corbell. Lazar claims that he worked with an alien spacecraft while he was employed in one of Area 51’s underground facilities.

Before coming out to KLAS, Roberts communicated with NPR via Facebook messenger under the pseudonym Val.

“I just thought it would be a funny idea for the meme page,” he wrote.

Roberts/Val also said that, although he doubted he’d have an actual army gathered to run into Area 51 this September, he’d been in touch “with some pretty great people” to plan a safer, yet still out-of-this-world desert event.

For its part, the Air Force told the Washington Post that Area 51 is an “open training range for the U.S. Air Force, and we would discourage anyone from trying to come into the area where we train American armed forces.”

CNN has also reached out to Roberts to talk more about his online sensation and how he might wield his newfound following. We’ll let you know when we make first contact.