Now playing
02:27
White nationalist: Trump gives nothing but racist tweets
Now playing
03:02
Avlon: Republicans offended by Biden's call for unity
WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 19: Rudy Giuliani holds up a mail-in ballot as he speaks to the press about various lawsuits related to the 2020 election,  inside the Republican National Committee headquarters on November 19, 2020 in Washington, DC. President Donald Trump, who has not been seen publicly in several days, continues to push baseless claims about election fraud and dispute the results of the 2020 United States presidential election. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 19: Rudy Giuliani holds up a mail-in ballot as he speaks to the press about various lawsuits related to the 2020 election, inside the Republican National Committee headquarters on November 19, 2020 in Washington, DC. President Donald Trump, who has not been seen publicly in several days, continues to push baseless claims about election fraud and dispute the results of the 2020 United States presidential election. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Drew Angerer/Getty Images North America/Getty Images
Now playing
02:30
Dominion contemplates next legal move after Giuliani lawsuit
US President Joe Biden delivers remarks before signing an Executive Order in the South Court Auditorium at the White House on January 25, 2021 in Washington, DC. (Photo by JIM WATSON / AFP) (Photo by JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images)
US President Joe Biden delivers remarks before signing an Executive Order in the South Court Auditorium at the White House on January 25, 2021 in Washington, DC. (Photo by JIM WATSON / AFP) (Photo by JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images)
PHOTO: Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images
Now playing
02:50
Biden thinks US can get to 1.5 million vaccine doses daily
TAMPA, FL - AUGUST 29:  U.S. Sen. Rob Portman (R-OH) waves during the third day of the Republican National Convention at the Tampa Bay Times Forum on August 29, 2012 in Tampa, Florida. Former Massachusetts Gov. Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney was nominated as the Republican presidential candidate during the RNC, which is scheduled to conclude August 30.  (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
TAMPA, FL - AUGUST 29: U.S. Sen. Rob Portman (R-OH) waves during the third day of the Republican National Convention at the Tampa Bay Times Forum on August 29, 2012 in Tampa, Florida. Former Massachusetts Gov. Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney was nominated as the Republican presidential candidate during the RNC, which is scheduled to conclude August 30. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Mark Wilson/Getty Images
Now playing
02:16
GOP senator explains why he won't seek reelection
diegal
diegal
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
02:58
Former Republican: We've got a bankrupt party
Now playing
02:26
See Biden sign executive order lifting transgender military ban
WASHINGTON, DC - AUGUST 10:  The Trump International Hotel is shown on August 10, 2017 in Washington, DC.  The hotel, located blocks from the White House, has become both a tourist attraction in the nation
WASHINGTON, DC - AUGUST 10: The Trump International Hotel is shown on August 10, 2017 in Washington, DC. The hotel, located blocks from the White House, has become both a tourist attraction in the nation's capital and also a symbol of President Trump's intermingling of business and politics. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Win McNamee/Getty Images
Now playing
01:56
Why SCOTUS is dismissing emolument cases against Trump
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
02:20
Legal analyst: Dominion's case looks pretty strong
John Avlon 0125
John Avlon 0125
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
03:08
Avlon: The Republicans who stood up to Trump were our bulwark
Now playing
03:19
Some GOP lawmakers are defying Capitol security measures
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
01:17
Sen. Romney: Senate trial after Trump leaving office is constitutional
Now playing
07:26
'What research did you do?': Brown presses GOP lawmaker on election fraud claims
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
01:42
Acosta describes covering last day of Trump administration
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 06: Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) attends a press conference with Rep. Andy Levin (D-MI) about their new bill called the EV Freedom Act on Capitol Hill on February 6, 2020 in Washington, DC. The EV Freedom Act is a plan to create a nation wide charging infrastructure for electric vehicles. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 06: Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) attends a press conference with Rep. Andy Levin (D-MI) about their new bill called the EV Freedom Act on Capitol Hill on February 6, 2020 in Washington, DC. The EV Freedom Act is a plan to create a nation wide charging infrastructure for electric vehicles. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Samuel Corum/Getty Images
Now playing
03:35
Rioter charged with threatening to 'assassinate' Ocasio-Cortez, officer
Now playing
02:41
Loyal Texas Trump voters want Biden to be less divisive
(CNN) —  

President Donald Trump’s racist comments about Democratic congresswomen have won him renewed support from white supremacists who had been losing faith that he was the hero they wanted to create a prospering White America.

Trump told the four women of color that they should “go back” to the “crime infested places” they came from, even though three of the four were born in the US and the fourth is a naturalized citizen.

Rep. Ayanna Pressley speaks as her colleagues listen - from left, Rep Ilhan Omar, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Rep. Rashida Tlaib.
Rep. Ayanna Pressley speaks as her colleagues listen - from left, Rep Ilhan Omar, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Rep. Rashida Tlaib.
PHOTO: Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

“Man, President Trump’s Twitter account has been pure fire lately. This might be the funniest thing he’s ever tweeted. This is the kind of WHITE NATIONALISM we elected him for,” wrote Andrew Anglin on his Daily Stormer site – one of the most highly trafficked neo-Nazi websites.

“And we’re obviously seeing it only because there’s another election coming up. But I’ll tell you, even knowing that, it still feels so good.”

Neo-Nazi Anglin should pay $14M to Jewish woman in troll storm attack, judge says

White nationalists had become openly frustrated by Trump recently for the failure to build a border wall and the lack of a promised immigration crackdown. “With a single tweet, Trump was able to win back the sizeable deluded portion of the Alt-Right, eager to take another trip on the merry-go-round,” prominent white nationalist Richard Spencer wrote on Twitter. Spencer, who infamously declared “Hail Trump” following the 2016 election at an event where people were seen apparently giving the Nazi salute, told CNN he now thought Trump was talk and no action. Spencer was one of those who led a torch rally in Charlottesville in August 2017, during a weekend when a neo-Nazi drove a car at a crowd of counter-protesters, killing one woman.

Trump also received support from a well-known white supremacist organizer who goes by the name “Augustus Invictus.”

Threads on 8chan and Gab – platforms used by the far-right for their permissive approach to hate speech – included praise for Trump’s comments, with many repeating some of the false narrative about the congresswomen’s heritages put forth by the President. “Anti-white politicians come to our country. Rather than kissing the soil and feeling grateful, they desire to remove our borders, speech, monuments, firearms, flags, and every single other part of US culture,” one poster wrote. “Why the F*** are they in the US in the first place if they can’t do the bare minimum of adopting US values?”

On Monday Trump was asked if he was concerned that white nationalists were finding common cause with him because of his racist attack on the women.

Trump responded: “It doesn’t concern me because many people agree with me. And all I’m saying, they want to leave, they can leave.”

One 8chan commenter wrote that they expected to see an uptick of supporters who “blindly emulate the President’s example.”

But they saw the reaction to Trump’s words as an “essential first step” in normalizing the hateful idea that individuals can choose not to exist alongside people they don’t like because of their skin color or where they come from.

The commenter wrote it would be a big step forward to normalize an idea that “it is ok for him not to want to be swamped by brown scum that clearly despise him, that these invaders have stepped well out of line making demands of us, and that if they don’t like the way we run things they can go the hell back,” the poster wrote. “These are the ideological seeds from which actual revolutions begin. When someone with perceived authority like Trump comes along and says them, it carries weight with many people. The jewish media is right to be terrified of these ideas becoming normalized.”

The White House and Trump himself continue to insist the racist tweets are not in fact racist. Trump tweeted Tuesday he did not have “a Racist bone in my body.”

His opponents have lined up to set the record straight including the targeted congresswomen, presidential candidates and a handful of members of the Republican Party.

“You’re right, Mr. President - you don’t have a racist bone in your body. You have a racist mind in your head, and a racist heart in your chest,” Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, one of the targeted congresswomen wrote in part on Twitter.

Jonathan Greenblatt, CEO of the Anti-Defamation League, which tracks incidents of hate, said Trump’s messages echo white supremacist talking points. “It’s hardly surprising that we’ve seen many white supremacists, neo-Nazis and anti-Muslim extremists celebrating Trump’s outbursts,” he told CNN. “To bigots, these types of comments are not a just dog-whistle, they’re a bullhorn validating their beliefs.”