PHOTO: CNN/Pool
Now playing
02:10
Trump: Iran better be careful
US Vice President-elect Kamala Harris (2nd L) with husband Douglas Emhoff and US President-elect Joe Biden (R) with wife Dr. Jill Biden watch as a Covid-19 Memorial is lighted at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, DC, on January 19, 2021 to honor the lives of those lost to Covid-19. (Photo by JIM WATSON / AFP) (Photo by JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images)
US Vice President-elect Kamala Harris (2nd L) with husband Douglas Emhoff and US President-elect Joe Biden (R) with wife Dr. Jill Biden watch as a Covid-19 Memorial is lighted at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, DC, on January 19, 2021 to honor the lives of those lost to Covid-19. (Photo by JIM WATSON / AFP) (Photo by JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images)
PHOTO: Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images
Now playing
03:42
'Striking': Tapper on Biden's Covid-19 memorial being first of its kind
trump farewell message
trump farewell message
PHOTO: White House Photo
Now playing
03:18
Trump offers 'best wishes' to new administration in farewell address
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 17: The U.S. Capitol dome is seen beyond a security fence on January 17, 2021 in Washington, DC. After last week
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 17: The U.S. Capitol dome is seen beyond a security fence on January 17, 2021 in Washington, DC. After last week's riots at the U.S. Capitol Building, the FBI has warned of additional threats in the nation's capital and in all 50 states. According to reports, as many as 25,000 National Guard soldiers will be guarding the city as preparations are made for the inauguration of Joe Biden as the 46th U.S. President. (Photo by Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images
Now playing
01:15
12 Army National Guard members removed from inauguration duty
Trump turns to reporters as he exits the White House to walk toward Marine One on the South Lawn on January 12, 2021 in Washington, DC.
Trump turns to reporters as he exits the White House to walk toward Marine One on the South Lawn on January 12, 2021 in Washington, DC.
PHOTO: Drew Angerer/Getty Images
Now playing
04:13
'He is actually worried': Collins reports on Trump pardon meeting
Left to right: Janet Yellen, Alejandro Mayorkas, Avril Haines, Lloyd Austin, and Antony Blinken
Left to right: Janet Yellen, Alejandro Mayorkas, Avril Haines, Lloyd Austin, and Antony Blinken
PHOTO: AFP & Getty Images
Now playing
04:32
Take a look at Biden's top cabinet nominees
Now playing
01:50
Ashley Biden on Beau's memory and the White House transition
PHOTO: Pool/Getty Images
Now playing
02:04
Mitch McConnell: Capitol rioters were fed lies
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
02:51
Why Black voters are hopeful for change under Biden administration
Bill Barr itvnews
Bill Barr itvnews
PHOTO: itv news
Now playing
02:22
Election fraud rhetoric 'precipitated riots' says Barr
PHOTO: Getty Images
Now playing
01:49
Reporter details differences between Trump and Biden's inaugurations
Now playing
03:11
Avlon looks back at Trump's Inauguration Day promises
Nuclear codes Biden Trump
Nuclear codes Biden Trump
PHOTO: Getty Images
Now playing
02:22
From Trump to Biden: How transfer of nuclear codes will work
Now playing
04:22
Trump's influential supporters spoke of what was coming before riot
McCarthy
McCarthy
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
01:40
'Far too close:' Army secretary reveals sobering details on riot
(CNN) —  

The House passed a massive annual defense spending bill Friday after some uncertainty over whether Democrats could get the bill across the finish line.

The vote was 220-197. Eight Democrats voted against the bill, and no Republicans supported it.

“This legislation keeps America strong with vital action to improve the economic security and well-being of our service members and families, including a much-needed pay raise,” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said on the floor in support of the bill.

The $733 billion package, known as the annual National Defense Authorization Act, falls short of the President’s request for $750 billion, a level that has already passed the Senate in its version.

Progressives threatened to take down the measure over opposition to the top line number and other provisions. Democratic leaders allowed votes on a number of key amendments lobbied for by progressives. Among them were two significant proposed policy shifts that were adopted, including a bipartisan ban on using funds to go to war with Iran without congressional approval and a repeal of the 2001 Authorization for Use of Military Force.

The House and Senate are expected to go to conference over the two bills, where several of the Democratic-passed amendments are expected to be cut.

The White House had issued a veto threat for the House bill before the vote.

“This bill will never become law. This was the repeat of when we left two weeks ago with the supplemental,” said House Republican Leader Kevin McCarthy. “You thought they would learn their lesson from that.”