Afrofuture Youth‏ Festival
Now playing
02:17
Music festival under fire for basing ticket prices on race
Fox News/Twitter
Now playing
01:33
ADL wants Fox News to fire Tucker Carlson over racist comments
CNN
Now playing
02:36
The truth behind Covid-19 vaccines for sale on the dark web
Now playing
04:22
Levi's CEO has message for Mitch McConnell
Now playing
01:54
'You think I'm racist': Former Fox News host storms off camera
Korie Robertson and Willie Robertson of the reality series "Duck Dynasty" attend the Capitol File 58th Presidential Inauguration Reception at Fiola Mare on January 19, 2017 in Washington, DC.
Paul Morigi/Getty Images
Korie Robertson and Willie Robertson of the reality series "Duck Dynasty" attend the Capitol File 58th Presidential Inauguration Reception at Fiola Mare on January 19, 2017 in Washington, DC.
Now playing
01:46
'Duck Dynasty' stars discuss raising biracial son on new show
FOX/"The Masked Singer"
Now playing
01:24
Nick Cannon makes big splash in 'Masked Singer' return
The Drew Barrymore Show/YouTube
Now playing
01:26
'Mom' star speaks out about not having kids in real life
Heinz ketchup packets are shown in New York on Monday, August 22, 2005. H.J. Heinz Co., the world's biggest ketchup maker, said first-quarter profit fell 19 percent on expenses to cut jobs and sell businesses.  (Photo by Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg/Getty Images
Heinz ketchup packets are shown in New York on Monday, August 22, 2005. H.J. Heinz Co., the world's biggest ketchup maker, said first-quarter profit fell 19 percent on expenses to cut jobs and sell businesses. (Photo by Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
Now playing
01:53
Restaurants face a nationwide ketchup packet shortage
Camerota Berman both
CNN
Camerota Berman both
Now playing
02:33
CNN anchor Alisyn Camerota gets surprise tribute from co-anchor
Citigroup Chairman Richard Parsons delivers remarks on the US economy at the New York State Bar Association meetings in New York, January 28, 2009. Troubled US banking giant Citigroup last week named Parsons as its new chairman, the longtime top executive at media giant Time Warner, to steer it through its most challenging period.  AFP PHOTO / Emmanuel Dunand (Photo credit should read EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP via Getty Images)
EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP/AFP via Getty Images
Citigroup Chairman Richard Parsons delivers remarks on the US economy at the New York State Bar Association meetings in New York, January 28, 2009. Troubled US banking giant Citigroup last week named Parsons as its new chairman, the longtime top executive at media giant Time Warner, to steer it through its most challenging period. AFP PHOTO / Emmanuel Dunand (Photo credit should read EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
02:47
Dick Parsons: Georgia law is a bald-faced attempt to suppress Black vote
Courtesy of Warner Bros. Picture
Now playing
02:54
'Godzilla vs. Kong' is a pandemic box office hit
Now playing
01:30
5 ways to cut your plastic waste
CNN/Getty Images
Now playing
04:40
Stelter: After elevating Gaetz, Fox News barely covering scandal
NASA/Goddard/University of Arizona
Now playing
01:08
See NASA spacecraft successfully land on an asteroid
Now playing
06:51
Alisyn Camerota's kids wish her good luck in new role on CNN
(CNN) —  

An Afrofuturist group says it reversed its decision to charge white people more for tickets to its Detroit festival than black and brown people because they received threats, an artist dropped out and a ticketing website threatened to unpublish their event.

The Eventbrite page for “AfroFuture Fest,” hosted by Afrofuture Youth, advertised an “Early Bird POC Ticket” for $10 – with POC meaning “people of color” – and an “Early Bird NONPOC Ticket” for $20. The group defined “NONPOC” as white people.

News of the group’s charging practices hit social media last week when rapper Tiny Jag said she was unknowingly added to the August event but agreed to support and perform. Tiny Jag told CNN she was not going to be paid for the performance. Once the rapper caught wind of the prices, she said she was “triggered.”

“A non-POC friend of mine brought to my attention that AfroFuture is requiring non-people-of-color to pay twice the amount to attend the festival as POC,” she tweeted on July 2. “This does not reflect the views of myself or the Tiny Jag team. I will not be playing this show. I apologize for anyone who may have been triggered or offended.”

The rapper said she is biracial and her grandmother is white. Tiny Jag told CNN Monday she felt emotionally triggered because the charging practice makes a group of people feel like they are not wanted at the event and like they’re paying a debt for another community.

“I didn’t think we were near that thinking that something like that could be progressive,” she said. “We have never seen hate work, I don’t understand.”

Eventbrite said in a statement to CNN they don’t “permit events that require attendees to pay different prices based on their protected characteristics such as race or ethnicity.”

“In this case, we have notified the creator of the event about this violation and requested that they alter their event accordingly,” their statement read. “We have offered them the opportunity to do this on their own accord; should they not wish to comply we will unpublish the event completely from our site.”

The group says its reasoning for doubling ticket prices for white people was because white people have the privilege to attend festivals in “POC populated cities.” In other words, the group says, white people can afford tickets to any event in any city, while black and brown people cannot.

“This cycle disproportionately displaces black and brown people from enjoying entertainment in their own communities,” the group said on Eventbrite.

Afrofuture Youth’s website says they are a youth program that looks to uplift black children “through the lens of Afrofuturism,” which is a philosophy looking at the intersection of African culture and technology.

After all the backlash, the group tweeted Sunday night that they had reversed their decision on ticketing prices because they “received threats from white supremacists” and children were “subjected to seeing racist comments” on social media.

The ticketing formula they came up with included a $20 general admission fee and a “suggested donation for nonPOC.”

“Events often designed for marginalized Black and Brown communities can be easily co-opted by those with cultural, monetary, and class privileges,” Afrofuture Youth wrote in its explanation on Eventbrite. The group added that they’re promoting “equity over equality” for black youth.

“Non-POC individuals are encouraged to provide additional donations as acknowledgment of this historical inequity,” the group said.

CNN has reached out to Afrofuture Youth for comment, but has not heard back.

CNN’s Carma Hassan contributed to this report.