Abortion-rights supporters stand on both sides of a street near the Gateway Arch as they take part in a protest in favor of reproductive rights Thursday, May 30, 2019, in St. Louis. A St. Louis judge heard an hour of arguments Thursday on Planned Parenthood
Abortion-rights supporters stand on both sides of a street near the Gateway Arch as they take part in a protest in favor of reproductive rights Thursday, May 30, 2019, in St. Louis. A St. Louis judge heard an hour of arguments Thursday on Planned Parenthood's request for a temporary restraining order that would prohibit the state from allowing the license for Missouri's only abortion clinic to lapse at midnight Friday. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)
PHOTO: Jeff Roberson/AP
Now playing
00:58
Missouri rules against state's last abortion clinic
McCarthy
McCarthy
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
01:40
'Far too close:' Army secretary reveals sobering details on riot
US President Donald Trump waves to the media as he makes his way to board Air Force One before departing from Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland on January 12, 2021. - Trump is traveling to Texas to review his border wall project. (Photo by MANDEL NGAN / AFP) (Photo by MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump waves to the media as he makes his way to board Air Force One before departing from Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland on January 12, 2021. - Trump is traveling to Texas to review his border wall project. (Photo by MANDEL NGAN / AFP) (Photo by MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images)
PHOTO: Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images
Now playing
03:44
Trump mostly in seclusion during final days of presidency
Members of the Michigan Boogaloo Bois an anti-government group stand with their long guns near the Capitol Building in Lansing, Michigan on January 17, 2021, during a nationwide protest called by anti-government and far-right groups supporting US President Donald Trump and his claim of electoral fraud in the November 3 presidential election. - The FBI warned authorities in all 50 states to prepare for armed protests at state capitals in the days leading up to the January 20 presidential inauguration of President-elect Joe Biden. (Photo by SETH HERALD / AFP) (Photo by SETH HERALD/AFP via Getty Images)
Members of the Michigan Boogaloo Bois an anti-government group stand with their long guns near the Capitol Building in Lansing, Michigan on January 17, 2021, during a nationwide protest called by anti-government and far-right groups supporting US President Donald Trump and his claim of electoral fraud in the November 3 presidential election. - The FBI warned authorities in all 50 states to prepare for armed protests at state capitals in the days leading up to the January 20 presidential inauguration of President-elect Joe Biden. (Photo by SETH HERALD / AFP) (Photo by SETH HERALD/AFP via Getty Images)
PHOTO: Seth Herald/AFP/Getty Images
Now playing
04:37
Expert: Social media to extremism is like oxygen to fire
Pharmacist Jason Hyde fills syringes with the Moderna Covid-19 vaccine as first responders wait to receive it at UMass Memorial Hospital in Marlborough, Massachusetts on January 12, 2021. - First Responders started to receive their vaccinations on January 11, as part of the phase one of vaccinations roll out in Massachusetts. (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo by JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP via Getty Images)
Pharmacist Jason Hyde fills syringes with the Moderna Covid-19 vaccine as first responders wait to receive it at UMass Memorial Hospital in Marlborough, Massachusetts on January 12, 2021. - First Responders started to receive their vaccinations on January 11, as part of the phase one of vaccinations roll out in Massachusetts. (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo by JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP via Getty Images)
PHOTO: Joseph Prezioso/AFP/Getty Images
Now playing
02:15
CDC warns new Covid-19 variants could accelerate spread in US
PHOTO: @FLOTUS
Now playing
02:51
Watch Melania Trump's farewell message
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 4: Rep. Lauren Boebert, R-Colo., is seen during a group photo with freshmen members of the House Republican Conference on the House steps of the Capitol on Monday, January 4, 2021. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 4: Rep. Lauren Boebert, R-Colo., is seen during a group photo with freshmen members of the House Republican Conference on the House steps of the Capitol on Monday, January 4, 2021. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images)
PHOTO: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc/Getty Images
Now playing
02:49
GOP lawmaker accused of giving 'reconnaissance' tour prior to Capitol riot
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
04:36
Former FBI adviser calls Trump a charismatic spark for extremism
guatemala honduras migrants tear gas Oppmann intl ldn vpx_00000604.png
guatemala honduras migrants tear gas Oppmann intl ldn vpx_00000604.png
PHOTO: CNNE
Now playing
01:30
Authorities use tear gas and batons against US-bound migrants
PHOTO: CNN Weather
Now playing
02:03
California faces strong winds and increased fire threat
PHOTO: Getty Images
Now playing
02:41
Alexey Navalny arrested on his return to Moscow
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
01:47
John King: It's a horrific time to become president
A sign for the National Security Agency (NSA), US Cyber Command and Central Security Service, is seen near the visitor
A sign for the National Security Agency (NSA), US Cyber Command and Central Security Service, is seen near the visitor's entrance to the headquarters of the National Security Agency (NSA) after a shooting incident at the entrance in Fort Meade, Maryland, February 14, 2018. - Shots were fired early Wednesday at the ultra-secret National Security Agency, the US electronic spying agency outside Washington, leaving one person injured, officials said. Aerial footage of the scene from NBC News showed a black SUV with numerous bullet holes in its windshield crashed into concrete barriers at the main entrance to the NSA's headquarters in Fort Meade, Maryland. (Photo by SAUL LOEB / AFP) (Photo by SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images)
PHOTO: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images
Now playing
01:31
Christopher Miller orders NSA chief to install Trump loyalist as agency's top lawyer
PHOTO: CNN Weather
Now playing
02:41
US to rejoin the Paris Climate Accord on Bidens First Day
Now playing
02:38
Biden: Science team 'among the brightest, most dedicated'
Mike Pence remarks vpx
Mike Pence remarks vpx
PHOTO: Senate TV
Now playing
02:27
New timeline shows just how close rioters got to Pence and his family
MyPillow notes
MyPillow notes
PHOTO: Jabin Botsford
Now playing
02:21
Photographer snaps notes of MyPillow CEO after visiting Trump
(CNN) —  

Missouri moved closer Friday to becoming the first state without an abortion clinic when its health department rejected a license renewal for the St. Louis Planned Parenthood location.

A judge had ordered the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services to decide by Friday whether it would renew a license for Reproductive Health Services of Planned Parenthood of the St. Louis Region. Judge Michael Stelzer relayed the health department’s decision Friday in court.

LIVE UPDATES

Refusal of the license renewal is only for abortions and does not include other services that Planned Parenthood offers, said Randall Williams, director of the Department of Health and Senior Services.

And, at least for now, the clinic may continue performing abortions, Stelzer added – until further court order. Should that change, Missouri could become the first state without an abortion clinic in almost 50 years.

The battle has been brewing for weeks as states across the country move to restrict access to the procedure.

The St. Louis Planned Parenthood clinic sued the state’s health department for refusing to renew its license, which was set to expire May 31. Stelzer granted a preliminary injunction that let the facility keep performing abortions while state officials decided on the license.

Williams said his department did not renew the abortion license because Planned Parenthood failed to correct 26 of 30 deficiencies found by regulators.

Williams said that doctors involved in the investigation of these deficiencies refused to cooperate.

In one case, a patient had three abortion-related services in three days, first a surgical that was unsuccessful, then a medical that was unsuccessful, and then a surgical again, Williams said. In another case, a patient had an abortion that failed, according to Williams.

Dr. Colleen McNicholas, a physician at the facility, told CNN the department is trying “to distort the safety record” to distract from its true goal of shutting down abortions.

McNicholas said she couldn’t discuss individual cases because of patient confidentiality laws, but said the St. Louis Planned Parenthood clinic had a complication rate lower than 1% among the 3,000-5,000 abortions it performs in a year.

“The risk of complications is incredibly low,” McNicholas said.

A study published in 2015 in the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology looking at more than 54,000 abortions in 2009-2010 found the risk of complications was 2.1% overall.

Planned Parenthood’s M’Evie Mead praised the judge Friday for keeping the clinic open for now.

“We will continue to fight for our ability to deliver high-quality, patient-centered health care, and that includes the full range of reproductive health care,” she said.

As for the state’s complaints, she said, “They restated a number of their other issues that Planned Parenthood has responded to with medically accurate, thorough responses; they continue to restate things that are already resolved as far as we’re concerned.”

Also at issue between the two sides was the state’s intention to require a woman to undergo a pelvic exam 72 hours before the procedure.

Mead said the exam was “weaponizing” the administrative process and was not in a woman’s best interests.

Williams said Friday he would allow Planned Parenthood to determine when that 72-hour window was not necessary.

Abortion remains legal in all 50 states under Roe v. Wade, the 1973 Supreme Court ruling.

States have approved numerous challenges to that decision this year. The most restrictive is Alabama’s, which bans virtually all abortions and could send doctors to prison for life if they perform the procedure. That law, slated to go into effect in the fall, is being challenged in court.

Missouri’s Republican governor this year signed a bill into law banning abortions at eight weeks, including in cases of rape and incest; it includes exceptions in cases when a mother’s life is at risk or she faces a serious permanent injury. It is scheduled to take effect August 28.

CNN’s Marlena Baldacci, Hollie Silverman, Sheena Jones and Theresa Waldrop contributed to this report.