Michelle Yeoh newday 08242018
PHOTO: CNN
Michelle Yeoh newday 08242018
Now playing
01:31
'Crazy Rich Asians' star: The audience wants this (2018)
Attorney-General Christian Porter speaks during a media conference on March 03, 2021 in Perth, Australia. Attorney-General Christian Porter has publicly confirmed he is the cabinet minister named in a historical rape allegation from 1988 which came to light in the last week and has emphatically denied the allegations.
PHOTO: Paul Kane/Getty Images
Attorney-General Christian Porter speaks during a media conference on March 03, 2021 in Perth, Australia. Attorney-General Christian Porter has publicly confirmed he is the cabinet minister named in a historical rape allegation from 1988 which came to light in the last week and has emphatically denied the allegations.
Now playing
02:25
Australian Attorney General denies historical rape allegation
Now playing
03:08
Cuba aims to produce its own Covid-19 vaccine
Police shoot stun grenades at Arab Israelis protesting an increase in gang violence in their towns.
PHOTO: CNN
Police shoot stun grenades at Arab Israelis protesting an increase in gang violence in their towns.
Now playing
04:18
Police shoot stun grenades at peaceful Arab-Israeli protesters
Mount Sinabung in Indonesia erupted on March 2, launching a cloud of ash and dust several kilometers into the sky. No one was injured in the eruption but authorities have warned people to stay away from the crater.
PHOTO: olcanological Survey of Indonesia via Reuters
Mount Sinabung in Indonesia erupted on March 2, launching a cloud of ash and dust several kilometers into the sky. No one was injured in the eruption but authorities have warned people to stay away from the crater.
Now playing
00:40
See this volcano in Indonesia erupt
New satellite images taken by Maxar show that North Korea sometime in the past year built a structure that may be intended to obscure entrances to an underground facility where nuclear weapons or nuclear weapons components are stored.
PHOTO: Courtesy Maxar
New satellite images taken by Maxar show that North Korea sometime in the past year built a structure that may be intended to obscure entrances to an underground facility where nuclear weapons or nuclear weapons components are stored.
Now playing
01:47
See images US intelligence claims is a secret weapons site
nigeria kidnapped schoolgirls released Busari pkg intl ldn vpx_00000423.png
nigeria kidnapped schoolgirls released Busari pkg intl ldn vpx_00000423.png
Now playing
02:09
Tears of joy and relief as 279 Nigerian schoolgirls return home
Protesters take cover behind homemade shields as tear gas is fired during a demonstration against the military coup in Yangon on March 1, 2021. (Photo by STR / AFP) (Photo by STR/AFP via Getty Images)
PHOTO: STR/AFP/AFP via Getty Images
Protesters take cover behind homemade shields as tear gas is fired during a demonstration against the military coup in Yangon on March 1, 2021. (Photo by STR / AFP) (Photo by STR/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
02:16
Footage shows tear gas, flash bangs used on protesters in Myanmar
01 rivers migrants pkg 02282021
PHOTO: CNN
01 rivers migrants pkg 02282021
Now playing
04:41
CNN correspondent speaks to migrants making dangerous journey to US
PARIS, FRANCE - MARCH 01: Former French President Nicolas Sarkozy leaves court after being found guilty of corruption and influence-peddling on March 01, 2021 in Paris, France. Mr. Sarkozy is only the second French president in modern times to have been convicted, after the conviction of former President Jacques Chirac in 2011.  (Photo by Kiran Ridley/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Kiran Ridley/Getty Images
PARIS, FRANCE - MARCH 01: Former French President Nicolas Sarkozy leaves court after being found guilty of corruption and influence-peddling on March 01, 2021 in Paris, France. Mr. Sarkozy is only the second French president in modern times to have been convicted, after the conviction of former President Jacques Chirac in 2011. (Photo by Kiran Ridley/Getty Images)
Now playing
03:23
'An earthquake in French politics': CNN reporter on Sarkozy sentence
PHOTO: Isaac Abrack
Now playing
03:00
Hear from schoolgirl who escaped abduction in Nigeria
UK police appealed for help Friday, Feb. 20, 2015, to find three teenage girls who are missing from their homes in London and are believed to be making their way to Syria.

The girls, two of them 15 and one 16, have not been seen since Tuesday, Feb. 17, 2015, when, police say, they took a flight to Istanbul. One has been named as Shamima Begum, 15, who may be traveling under the name of 17-year-old Aklima Begum, and a second as Kadiza Sultana, 16. The third girl is identified as Amira Abase, 15.
PHOTO: Metropolitan Police
UK police appealed for help Friday, Feb. 20, 2015, to find three teenage girls who are missing from their homes in London and are believed to be making their way to Syria. The girls, two of them 15 and one 16, have not been seen since Tuesday, Feb. 17, 2015, when, police say, they took a flight to Istanbul. One has been named as Shamima Begum, 15, who may be traveling under the name of 17-year-old Aklima Begum, and a second as Kadiza Sultana, 16. The third girl is identified as Amira Abase, 15.
Now playing
00:39
Shamima Begum loses legal bid to return home to appeal citizenship revocation
PHOTO: Obtained by CNN
Now playing
08:29
How a religious festival turned into a massacre
Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman attends a conference in the Saudi capital Riyadh on October 2018.
PHOTO: FAYEZ NURELDINE/AFP/Getty Images
Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman attends a conference in the Saudi capital Riyadh on October 2018.
Now playing
02:10
US intel report: Saudi Crown Prince responsible for approving Khashoggi operation
A Fijian rugby team serenaded workers in the Sydney hotel where they are quarantining.
PHOTO: Costa Argyrous
A Fijian rugby team serenaded workers in the Sydney hotel where they are quarantining.
Now playing
00:45
See Fijian rugby team serenade quarantine staff in Australia
Soldiers stand guard outside the CRS Turi prison in Cuenca, Ecuador on February 24, 2021. - At least 79 inmates died in simultaneous riots blamed on gang warfare at four prisons in Ecuador, officials said Wednesday. (Photo by FERNANDO MACHADO / AFP) (Photo by FERNANDO MACHADO/AFP via Getty Images)
PHOTO: FERNANDO MACHADO/AFP/AFP via Getty Images
Soldiers stand guard outside the CRS Turi prison in Cuenca, Ecuador on February 24, 2021. - At least 79 inmates died in simultaneous riots blamed on gang warfare at four prisons in Ecuador, officials said Wednesday. (Photo by FERNANDO MACHADO / AFP) (Photo by FERNANDO MACHADO/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
01:54
Ecuador prison riots leave dozens dead in gang 'extermination'

Editor’s Note: Jeff Yang is a frequent contributor to CNN Opinion, a featured writer for Quartz and other publications, and the co-host of the podcast “They Call Us Bruce.” He co-wrote Jackie Chan’s best-selling autobiography, “I Am Jackie Chan” and is the editor of three graphic novels: “Secret Identities,” “Shattered” and the forthcoming “New Frontiers.” The opinions expressed in this commentary are his. Read more opinion articles on CNN.

(CNN) —  

It used to be common for Asian Americans in Hollywood to joke about the “rule of one” – the unwritten law that historically seemed to limit every ensemble cast to just one Asian actor; all of network TV to just one Asian TV show; every film season to just one Asian movie. But over the past 12 months, we’ve seen a remarkable string of critically acclaimed and commercially successful movies created by and starring Asian Americans, beginning with “Crazy Rich Asians,” continuing with “To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before” and “Searching” – and now hitting a new gear with Netflix’s delightful new Ali Wong/Randall Park comedy, “Always Be My Maybe.”

Jeff Yang
Jeff Yang

The luxury of having this run of films come out in such close proximity is that they’ve shown us the many contrasting ways that Asian American stories can be told. Three of them – “Crazy,” “To All the Boys” and “Always” – are rom-coms, but each explores love in a wildly different setting, with protagonists of varied ages and backgrounds. Three of them – “Searching,” “To All the Boys” and “Always” – focus on families forging ahead after the untimely death of a mother, but the circumstances of their bereavement and the coping mechanisms each protagonist engages in are singular and distinct. Now that the “rule of one” is being broken in earnest, we’ve finally arrived at a moment where everyone can see the amazing diversity within Asian American communities.

That’s not to say there aren’t subtle similarities that link our tales together: The persistent tension between duty and aspiration. The simultaneous need to forge identities apart from our parents, and to also win their approval. The deep well of historical and familial sacrifice and loss that can splash melancholy across even the most joyous of present-day moments.

A scene from "Crazy Rich Asians."
PHOTO: Warner Bros.
A scene from "Crazy Rich Asians."

These films have given audiences an immersion into the way these themes weave across all of our diverse Asian American experiences. And they’ve done so, perhaps unsurprisingly, in part by using one of the most universal and accessible languages of all: food.

Food is what brings many Asian families together and helps us express feelings that can’t be said out loud. Food is a repository of tradition and memory, allowing us to confirm our connection to the past and commemorate those who’ve gone on before us. Food is at the center of the smallest and biggest of celebrations, from reunions and homecomings to weddings and holiday festivities.

From "Crazy Rich Asians."
PHOTO: Warner Bros.
From "Crazy Rich Asians."

In “Crazy Rich Asians,” romantic lead Nick Young’s homecoming is celebrated first by his friends at a glorious street-food center, and then at the family mansion with a gigantic feast. Later in the film, one of the most memorable and pivotal scenes centers on the Young family’s gathering around a grand table for communal dumpling-making.

Matriarch Eleanor, played by Michelle Yeoh, explains to newcomer Rachel (Constance Wu) that this is a ritual that reminds the wealthy family of what they owe to prior generations, and of their simpler and poorer past.

From "Searching."
PHOTO: Screen Gems
From "Searching."

In “Searching,” the hit thriller starring John Cho as a father seeking his mysteriously missing daughter, his late wife’s kimchi gumbo serves as a symbol of her absence; it’s something he has refused to cook since her death, stark evidence of his inability to acknowledge and move on from his loss. The recipe for the dish ends up being a key clue to the backstory of his daughter Margot’s disappearance.

In “To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before,” the Netflix rom-com that became a runaway young-adult hit, Lara Jean’s father (played by John Corbett) attempts and fails to cook his daughters a favorite Korean dish from their mother’s recipe; the rock-hard roast pork he serves is played for laughs, but it highlights the gaps that her passing has left in their lives, both familial and cultural, and ways that these have left Lana Condor’s Lara Jean feeling unmoored and isolated from the world.

From "To All the Boys I've Loved Before."
PHOTO: Netflix
From "To All the Boys I've Loved Before."

But the use of food as a stand-in for love, belonging and especially identity and perspective is particularly poignant in “Always Be My Maybe,” in which co-writer Ali Wong’s character, chef Sasha Tran, grows up as a latchkey kid, forced to prepare her own snacks of Spam on rice. She ultimately finds connection to the family of her neighbor (and first crush) Marcus (played by Randall Park) through the comforting Korean cuisine made by his mother. But after experiencing her death and Marcus’s guilt-induced rejection, Sasha seeks out a very different kind of cuisine: Asian fusion fare that she defines as “transcendent” and “transdenominational.”

The food she creates appropriates the elements of Asian culture to feed non-Asian consumers, divorcing it from its diverse roots and its ties to a wide-spanning community in the service of her personal ambitions as a Food & Wine-awarded up-and-coming superstar.

A scene from "Always Be My Maybe."
PHOTO: Netflix
A scene from "Always Be My Maybe."

It’s the rule of one, playing out in culinary terms – elevating a flattened, synthesized view of Asian identity and a single celebrated cultural expression as a stand-in for a much vaster spectrum of perspectives.

In the course of the movie, Sasha finds the confidence to unleash her suppressed history; to share in telling other people’s stories; to elevate and celebrate points of view that aren’t her own. While her prior spots are shown to be upscale celebrations of Sasha’s own genius, with icy, forbidding gatekeepers and a mostly white clientele, the restaurant she opens at the end of the movie, Judy’s Way, is a commemoration of Marcus’s late mother — welcoming, diverse, open to all and focused on revealing culture and creativity that might otherwise be overlooked, lost and forgotten.

Get our free weekly newsletter

Not a bad metaphor for where we are today as Asian Americans. After decades of sitting down to austere one-serving meals, we’re now being treated to a buffet. Don’t stop now, Hollywood, because you don’t know how hungry we’ve been.