Now playing
03:06
How influencers keep their #ads and their audiences
A Facebook employee walks by a sign displaying the "like" sign at Facebook's corporate headquarters campus in Menlo Park, California, on October 23, 2019. (Photo by Josh Edelson / AFP) (Photo by JOSH EDELSON/AFP via Getty Images)
PHOTO: Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images
A Facebook employee walks by a sign displaying the "like" sign at Facebook's corporate headquarters campus in Menlo Park, California, on October 23, 2019. (Photo by Josh Edelson / AFP) (Photo by JOSH EDELSON/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
02:36
Facebook to restore news in Australia
Chris, a Trump supporter, reacts to a fact check of a manipulated video shared by the Trump campaign.
PHOTO: CNN
Chris, a Trump supporter, reacts to a fact check of a manipulated video shared by the Trump campaign.
Now playing
03:58
What Trump supporters see on their Facebook feeds
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
02:03
Watch this former exec compare Facebook to Big Tobacco
Screengrab Nick Clegg facebook
PHOTO: CNN
Screengrab Nick Clegg facebook
Now playing
07:34
Facebook exec explains the company's US election actions
PHOTO: Getty Images
Now playing
05:15
Misleading videos shared by Republicans get millions of views
Now playing
02:24
Under questioning, Zuckerberg admits Instagram was a 'competitor'
Now playing
03:31
Congresswoman grills Facebook CEO on copying competitors
PHOTO: From Facebook
Now playing
02:40
Zuckerberg blasts Trump administration for worsening pandemic
Facebook co-founder, Chairman and CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before the House Energy and Commerce Committee in the Rayburn House Office Building on Capitol Hill April 11, 2018 in Washington, DC. This is the second day of testimony before Congress by Zuckerberg, 33, after it was reported that 87 million Facebook users had their personal information harvested by Cambridge Analytica, a British political consulting firm linked to the Trump campaign.  (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
Facebook co-founder, Chairman and CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before the House Energy and Commerce Committee in the Rayburn House Office Building on Capitol Hill April 11, 2018 in Washington, DC. This is the second day of testimony before Congress by Zuckerberg, 33, after it was reported that 87 million Facebook users had their personal information harvested by Cambridge Analytica, a British political consulting firm linked to the Trump campaign. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Now playing
03:33
Facebook meeting 'disappointing,' says ad boycott organizer
This picture taken on July 4, 2019 in Nantes, shows logos of the US online social media and social networking service, Facebook. (Photo by LOIC VENANCE / AFP)        (Photo credit should read LOIC VENANCE/AFP via Getty Images)
PHOTO: LOIC VENANCE/AFP/AFP via Getty Images
This picture taken on July 4, 2019 in Nantes, shows logos of the US online social media and social networking service, Facebook. (Photo by LOIC VENANCE / AFP) (Photo credit should read LOIC VENANCE/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
02:41
He quit Facebook over Zuckerberg's handling of Trump posts. Hear why
PHOTO: Glenn Chapman/AFP/Getty Images/CNN
Now playing
03:38
He says Facebook's Libra is the future. Lawmakers aren't so sure
PHOTO: YouTube/Financial Services Committee
Now playing
02:15
Zuckerberg struggles to explain whether Facebook fact checks political ads
Mark Zuckerberg remained silent after Congressman Barry Loudermilk compared him to President Trump.
Mark Zuckerberg remained silent after Congressman Barry Loudermilk compared him to President Trump.
Now playing
00:43
Watch Zuckerberg react when a lawmaker compares him to Trump
Facebook's CEO Mark Zuckerberg delivers his speech during the VivaTech (Viva Technology) trade fair in Paris, on May 24, 2018. (Photo by GERARD JULIEN / AFP)        (Photo credit should read GERARD JULIEN/AFP/Getty Images)
PHOTO: GERARD JULIEN/AFP/Getty Images
Facebook's CEO Mark Zuckerberg delivers his speech during the VivaTech (Viva Technology) trade fair in Paris, on May 24, 2018. (Photo by GERARD JULIEN / AFP) (Photo credit should read GERARD JULIEN/AFP/Getty Images)
Now playing
03:21
This is how Facebook kills its competition
facebook zuckerberg origin business orig _00011530.jpg
facebook zuckerberg origin business orig _00011530.jpg
Now playing
01:47
It took Facebook 15 years to take over the world. Here's how
(CNN Business) —  

You may soon spot influencers you don’t follow in your Instagram feed.

On Tuesday, the Facebook-owned photo sharing platform announced it is rolling out what it calls “branded content ads.” This will allow brands to make influencers’ sponsored content posts appear as ads so a bigger audience sees them.

Businesses will be able to place these ads in the Instagram feed in the coming weeks and in Stories in the next few months. When branded content ads appear, they’ll look similar to regular ads, but users will see the words “paid partnership” and the brand’s name on the bottom.

Sixty-eight percent of people come to Instagram to interact with influencers, according to the company. Brands often pay influencers — also called social media stars or creators — to promote products on their personal social media accounts to reach their followers. For example, an influencer could be paid to post images of them using teeth whitening strips or laundry detergent from a certain brand.

Previously, only people following influencers or brands would see their paid content. Now, those posts will appear on users’ feeds and Stories even if they don’t follow that social media star, just like other ads on Instagram.

“Creators have found a way to use Instagram to share their lives, passions and interests … and they’ve built really strong audiences around those interests,” Susan Buckner Rose, Instagram’s director of business product marketing, told CNN Business. “There’s a natural opportunity for brands to build partnerships with those creators to reach those same audiences.”

Product recommendations from influencers feel more authentic than traditional advertising, according to Beca Alexander, founder and president of influencer casting and marketing agency Socialyte.

“Their audiences trust them and their opinion,” she said. “They feel like they have this personal connection with these influencers because the influencers give them a view into their day-to-day lives.”

Instagram is rolling out branded content ads.
PHOTO: Instagram/CNN
Instagram is rolling out branded content ads.

The move will allow both brands and influencers to increase the reach of the paid posts, and target a bigger and more specific audience, such as women between the ages of 18 and 34 who are interested in beauty products.

It’s also a way for Instagram to tap into the growing influencer marketing industry, which has flourished on its platform. While Instagram doesn’t take a cut of influencer-brand partnerships, it will now make money from the new branded content ads, like it does with other ads on its platform.

Branded content ads are also an effort to increase transparency about influencer and brand deals. In recent years, Instagram has been criticized for the lack of transparency of sponsored posts on its platform.

According to FTC guidelines, if a person is being paid to promote something on their own social media account, posts should have a disclosure, such as “#ad.” The FTC also advises influencers to make disclosures if they receive items for free. The issue is difficult for the agency to police due to limited resources.

Instagram has responded by testing a tag above a post that indicates it’s a paid partnership with a brand. The company will now be making that tag more widely available in the coming weeks.