Got mass shooting insurance? Los Angeles mayor's ad campaign looks to raise awareness of gun violence

Gun violence insurance ads appear at bus stops throughout Los Angeles as part of a campaign to raise awareness about gun violence.

(CNN)There are new bus stop ads in Los Angeles that will cause Angelenos to do a double take.

"If there's a shooting, are you covered?" reads one ad in all capital letters. Another promotes "Mass shooting insurance," calling it "America's signature coverage."
There's no actual insurance for sale. The ads are part of a campaign to raise awareness about gun violence and encourage action against it.
The fine print on each ad: "On average, 100 people are killed by guns in the US every day. Although the violence is real, this insurance is not. It's a wake-up call to take action. Together, we can be Louder Than Guns and end gun violence."
    Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti's office launched the "Louder Than Guns" campaign to urge residents to find ways to bring an end to gun violence, the mayor's office said in a news release. The campaign, the news release said, is intended to "shine a light on the senselessness of gun violence" and provide people with tools to push for change. The campaign's "Gunsure Insurance" ads are posted at bus stops and on social media.
    "We will never accept gun violence as the new normal for our kids — and none of us can be silent when students see lockdown drills as the norm and there are bulletproof backpacks for sale in America," Garcetti said in the release.
    The campaign was organized by the Mayor's Youth Council to End Gun Violence, in partnership with the creative agency Omelet. The mayor's council, according to Garcetti's office, is the first "mayor-led initiative in the country" to put people under 18 in leadership roles within city government to "drive action and advocacy on gun violence prevention."
    "We may be teenagers, but we have grown up in an era of mass shootings and seen gun violence take the lives of our peers. We can't wait for anyone else to shake themselves out of complacency, so we're taking our lives into our own hands," said Paula Kim, a member of the mayor's council.
    Katherine Henriquez, also a member of the council, told CNN affiliate KABC-TV that society has become desensitized to gun violence because it's seen everyday on the news.
    "Getting something that's this eye-catching, this big, brings more attention to it and says 'Hey, this is actually happening. It's a big deal. We should do something about it,'" she said.
      The "Gunsure Insurance" ads will be replaced on June 7 by posters that lead Angelenos to the campaign website, the mayor's office said.
      The campaign's website directs people to the city's Gang Reduction and Youth Development office and also provides free downloads of branded "Louder than Guns" paraphernalia including text book covers, phone backgrounds and door hangers. It also features the stories of residents and students impacted by gun violence and allows users to share their own experiences.