WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 14: U.S. President Donald Trump declines to answer a final question from the press as he departs the White House January 14, 2019 in Washington, DC. Trump is scheduled to travel to New Orleans today to address the American Farm Bureau Federation's 100th annual convention. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
Win McNamee/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 14: U.S. President Donald Trump declines to answer a final question from the press as he departs the White House January 14, 2019 in Washington, DC. Trump is scheduled to travel to New Orleans today to address the American Farm Bureau Federation's 100th annual convention. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
Now playing
03:18
CNN analyst explores Trump's game of 'hide the taxes'
Wayne LaPierre, Executive Vice President and Chief Executive Officer of the NRA, arrives prior to a speech by US President Donald Trump at the National Rifle Association (NRA) Annual Meeting at Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis, Indiana, April 26, 2019.
SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images
Wayne LaPierre, Executive Vice President and Chief Executive Officer of the NRA, arrives prior to a speech by US President Donald Trump at the National Rifle Association (NRA) Annual Meeting at Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis, Indiana, April 26, 2019.
Now playing
02:30
NRA CEO says he needed to take shelter on a yacht
A second eruption of the La Soufriere volcano occurred at approximately 2:45pm local time, according to the UWI Seismic Research Centre.
UWI Seismic Research Centre
A second eruption of the La Soufriere volcano occurred at approximately 2:45pm local time, according to the UWI Seismic Research Centre.
Now playing
01:44
St. Vincent volcano erupts in Southern Caribbean
Getty Images
Now playing
02:25
Hear what Clyburn wants to tell Manchin after CNN interview
pool
Now playing
02:18
GOP congressman calls on Gaetz to resign
MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA - MARCH 28: Community activists light candles at a memorial near the site where George Floyd died at the hands of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin on March 28, 2021 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The trial for Chauvin, who is accused of murder in Floyd's death, begins tomorrow. Security is heightened in the city in an effort to prevent a repeat of rioting that occurred in Minneapolis and major cities around the world following Floyd's death on May 25, 2020.  (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Scott Olson/Getty Images
MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA - MARCH 28: Community activists light candles at a memorial near the site where George Floyd died at the hands of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin on March 28, 2021 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The trial for Chauvin, who is accused of murder in Floyd's death, begins tomorrow. Security is heightened in the city in an effort to prevent a repeat of rioting that occurred in Minneapolis and major cities around the world following Floyd's death on May 25, 2020. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Now playing
03:28
Sorrow flows through community at scene of George Floyd's death
INGLEWOOD, CA - OCTOBER 04:  DMX performs onstage during the Bad Boy Family Reunion Tour at The Forum on October 4, 2016 in Inglewood, California.  (Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images for Live Nation)
Kevin Winter/Getty Images
INGLEWOOD, CA - OCTOBER 04: DMX performs onstage during the Bad Boy Family Reunion Tour at The Forum on October 4, 2016 in Inglewood, California. (Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images for Live Nation)
Now playing
03:22
Rapper and actor DMX dead at 50
Britain's Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, in his role as Captain General, Royal Marines, attends a Parade to mark the finale of the 1664 Global Challenge on the Buckingham Palace Forecourt in central London on August 2, 2017.  
After a lifetime of public service by the side of his wife Queen Elizabeth II, Prince Philip finally retires on August 2, 2017,at the age of 96. The Duke of Edinburgh attended a parade of Royal Marines at Buckingham Palace, the last of 22,219 solo public engagements since she ascended to the throne in 1952.
 / AFP PHOTO / POOL / HANNAH MCKAY        (Photo credit should read HANNAH MCKAY/AFP/Getty Images)
HANNAH MCKAY/AFP/Getty Images
Britain's Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, in his role as Captain General, Royal Marines, attends a Parade to mark the finale of the 1664 Global Challenge on the Buckingham Palace Forecourt in central London on August 2, 2017. After a lifetime of public service by the side of his wife Queen Elizabeth II, Prince Philip finally retires on August 2, 2017,at the age of 96. The Duke of Edinburgh attended a parade of Royal Marines at Buckingham Palace, the last of 22,219 solo public engagements since she ascended to the throne in 1952. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / HANNAH MCKAY (Photo credit should read HANNAH MCKAY/AFP/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:39
The life of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh
Caribbean st vincent island volcano eruption Oppmann lkl intl hnk vpx_00001102.png
Caribbean st vincent island volcano eruption Oppmann lkl intl hnk vpx_00001102.png
Now playing
01:01
Caribbean island evacuated ahead of 'imminent' volcano eruption
KCAL/KCBS
Now playing
01:45
Bodycam video shows LAPD arrest the wrong man
Now playing
00:00
Why this new rapid coronavirus test could be a game-changer
screengrab notre dame restoration
CNN
screengrab notre dame restoration
Now playing
03:06
Stunning footage shows restoration work on Notre Dame
CNN
Now playing
05:54
SE Cupp: What two politicians and a 'real' housewife have in common
Former House Speaker John Boehner attends a ceremony to unveil a portrait of himself on Capitol Hill, Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2019 in Washington.
Michael A. McCoy/AP
Former House Speaker John Boehner attends a ceremony to unveil a portrait of himself on Capitol Hill, Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2019 in Washington.
Now playing
02:42
Boehner says Republican colleague held 10-inch knife to his throat outside House floor
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 17:  Representative Matt Gaetz, a Republican from Florida, listens during a markup on H.R. 7120, the "Justice in Policing Act of 2020,"  on June 17, 2020, in Washington, D.C. The House bill would make it easier to prosecute and sue officers and would ban federal officers from using choke holds, bar racial profiling, end "no-knock" search warrants in drug cases, create a national registry for police violations, and require local police departments that get federal funds to conduct bias training.  (Photo by Erin Scott-Pool via Getty Images)
Erin Scot/Pool/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 17: Representative Matt Gaetz, a Republican from Florida, listens during a markup on H.R. 7120, the "Justice in Policing Act of 2020," on June 17, 2020, in Washington, D.C. The House bill would make it easier to prosecute and sue officers and would ban federal officers from using choke holds, bar racial profiling, end "no-knock" search warrants in drug cases, create a national registry for police violations, and require local police departments that get federal funds to conduct bias training. (Photo by Erin Scott-Pool via Getty Images)
Now playing
02:10
Attorney for Gaetz associate: I'm sure Gaetz is not feeling very comfortable
Joe Manchin
CNN
Joe Manchin
Now playing
02:03
'I never thought in my life ...' Why Manchin won't walk away from bipartisanship
(CNN) —  

A second federal judge has now rebuffed President Donald Trump’s sweeping attempt to block House lawmakers from accessing his financial records, handing him another defeat in a fight that has infuriated the President and opened deep rifts with Democrats.

Judge Edgardo Ramos in New York on Wednesday refused to block subpoenas from the House Intelligence and Financial Services panels for Trump’s financial records from Deutsche Bank and Capital One. It’s the second such ruling against the President in three days.

Earlier Wednesday, Trump lashed out at Democrats for what he claimed were attempts to harass and undermine his presidency, declaring during an irate appearance in the Rose Garden he could no longer work with them as they proceed in their investigations.

The White House has stonewalled Democratic oversight requests, has refused to comply with subpoenas issued for information and is blocking former officials from testifying.

Part of the strategy is to prompt a drawn-out legal battle. But the new ruling is a second major setback.

Ramos’ decision starts a one-week clock for Trump’s legal team to find a way to hold off the banks from handing over decades or more of extensive information about Trump, his businesses and his family members, including White House adviser and son-in-law Jared Kushner.

Earlier this week, Judge Amit Mehta in Washington, DC, said Trump’s former accounting firm Mazars would have to comply with a subpoena from Congress. Trump’s legal team appealed on Tuesday, and the parties have agreed on an expedited briefing and hearing schedule that awaits signoff from an appeals court judge. If the judge signs off, the subpoena would be paused at least through July.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said that she was “very excited” by the outcome.

“Very excited, no surprise,” Pelosi told reporters. “Two in one week. Mazars Monday, Deutsche Bank today.”

House Oversight Committee Chairman Elijah Cummings told reporters the latest ruling “definitely” helps his committee’s case with its subpoena to Mazars.

“We now have two opinions. I think we’re going to have more,” Cummings said. “Clearly I think the courts are going to uphold the rule of law.”

In reaction to the court ruling against the President and his company, Trump Organization lawyer Marc Mukasey said, “Fight on.”

Trump’s lawyers have not yet appealed Ramos’ ruling, and the judge refused to give them more time than a week to pause the subpoena so they could appeal.

When asked about what was next, Trump’s attorney Patrick Strawbridge told the judge Wednesday he’d “confer with our client.”

“Any delay” may hurt the committees’ work, Ramos added.

Reading his 25-page opinion from the bench after a hearing Wednesday afternoon, Ramos said the House committees seeking Trump’s financial information have legitimate legislative purposes.

The subpoenas are broad, he said, but they are “clearly pertinent” to Congress’ work.

These subpoenas “do not constitute impermissible law enforcement activities,” he said, adding that he believes lawmakers should receive the documents quickly.

RELATED: Pelosi says Trump is ‘engaged in a cover-up’

The two court cases over House subpoenas, running closely in tandem, represent a major attempt by Trump to prevent Congress from reaching his personal and business records. The House has also requested Trump’s tax returns from the IRS, and Democrats in the House and the Senate are pursuing another court case that may allow them to look into the President’s business records for signs of foreign influence.

In the New York case, the House Financial Services and Intelligence committees requested a large swath of Trump family and business records from Deutsche Bank and Capital One bank in April, saying they need the records to consider banking policy revisions and to investigate the President’s financial tangles with foreign powers, such as Russia.

Trump’s private legal team argues that the records requests violate his and his family’s privacy and have no legislative purpose.

CNN’s Kevin Liptak, Jeremy Herb, Cristina Alesci, Kara Scannell and Caroline Kelly contributed to this report.