Employees pull pallet trucks at the Amazon.com Inc. fulfillment center in Robbinsville, New Jersey, U.S., on Monday, Nov. 27, 2017. The holiday shopping season is off to a strong start and retailers appear to be continuing the momentum today -- Cyber Monday -- the biggest online spending day of the year. Photographer: Victor J. Blue/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Victor J. Blue/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Employees pull pallet trucks at the Amazon.com Inc. fulfillment center in Robbinsville, New Jersey, U.S., on Monday, Nov. 27, 2017. The holiday shopping season is off to a strong start and retailers appear to be continuing the momentum today -- Cyber Monday -- the biggest online spending day of the year. Photographer: Victor J. Blue/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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(CNN Business) —  

McDonald’s is taking a lot of heat from workers’ rights groups leading up to its annual shareholder meeting Thursday.

This week, the burger chain has been accused of failing to protect workers from sexual harassment and violence. High-profile activists like actress Padma Lakshmi joined a worker protest in Chicago. And Time’s Up, which aims to combat workplace sexual misconduct, sent an open letter to McDonald’s CEO Steve Easterbrook.

McDonald’s will face activist pressure inside and outside its shareholder meeting, and the tension is escalating.

Outside the meeting, presidential candidate Senator Bernie Sanders, a long-time supporter of raising the minimum wage, is scheduled to host a town hall with the shareholders via video conference. Other presidential candidates will stand alongside workers protesting in other cities.

Fight for $15, an advocacy group for higher wages, is pegging its actions to the event. But they won’t actually be present during the meeting, which is for the company’s investors.

Inside the meeting, McDonald’s may be pressed on a hodgepodge of issues. The Corporate Accountability activist shareholder group plans to bolster its proposal that shareholders will be able to act by written consent. And Change.Org hopes one of its members attending the meeting will get to ask McDonald’s to add more vegan and vegetarian options to its menu.

It’s not unusual for companies — especially leaders like McDonald’s