WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 2:  Pro-choice advocates (left) and anti-abortion advocates (right) rally outside of the Supreme Court, March 2, 2016 in Washington, DC.  On Wednesday morning, the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in the Whole Woman's Health v. Hellerstedt case, where the justices will consider a Texas law requiring that clinic doctors have admitting privileges at local hospitals and that clinics upgrade their facilities to standards similar to hospitals. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
Drew Angerer/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 2: Pro-choice advocates (left) and anti-abortion advocates (right) rally outside of the Supreme Court, March 2, 2016 in Washington, DC. On Wednesday morning, the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in the Whole Woman's Health v. Hellerstedt case, where the justices will consider a Texas law requiring that clinic doctors have admitting privileges at local hospitals and that clinics upgrade their facilities to standards similar to hospitals. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:56
Nation's most restrictive abortion bill signed into law
Wayne LaPierre, Executive Vice President and Chief Executive Officer of the NRA, arrives prior to a speech by US President Donald Trump at the National Rifle Association (NRA) Annual Meeting at Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis, Indiana, April 26, 2019.
SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images
Wayne LaPierre, Executive Vice President and Chief Executive Officer of the NRA, arrives prior to a speech by US President Donald Trump at the National Rifle Association (NRA) Annual Meeting at Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis, Indiana, April 26, 2019.
Now playing
02:30
NRA CEO says he needed to take shelter on a yacht
A second eruption of the La Soufriere volcano occurred at approximately 2:45pm local time, according to the UWI Seismic Research Centre.
UWI Seismic Research Centre
A second eruption of the La Soufriere volcano occurred at approximately 2:45pm local time, according to the UWI Seismic Research Centre.
Now playing
01:44
St. Vincent volcano erupts in Southern Caribbean
Getty Images
Now playing
02:25
Hear what Clyburn wants to tell Manchin after CNN interview
pool
Now playing
02:18
GOP congressman calls on Gaetz to resign
MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA - MARCH 28: Community activists light candles at a memorial near the site where George Floyd died at the hands of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin on March 28, 2021 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The trial for Chauvin, who is accused of murder in Floyd's death, begins tomorrow. Security is heightened in the city in an effort to prevent a repeat of rioting that occurred in Minneapolis and major cities around the world following Floyd's death on May 25, 2020.  (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Scott Olson/Getty Images
MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA - MARCH 28: Community activists light candles at a memorial near the site where George Floyd died at the hands of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin on March 28, 2021 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The trial for Chauvin, who is accused of murder in Floyd's death, begins tomorrow. Security is heightened in the city in an effort to prevent a repeat of rioting that occurred in Minneapolis and major cities around the world following Floyd's death on May 25, 2020. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Now playing
03:28
Sorrow flows through community at scene of George Floyd's death
INGLEWOOD, CA - OCTOBER 04:  DMX performs onstage during the Bad Boy Family Reunion Tour at The Forum on October 4, 2016 in Inglewood, California.  (Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images for Live Nation)
Kevin Winter/Getty Images
INGLEWOOD, CA - OCTOBER 04: DMX performs onstage during the Bad Boy Family Reunion Tour at The Forum on October 4, 2016 in Inglewood, California. (Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images for Live Nation)
Now playing
03:22
Rapper and actor DMX dead at 50
Britain's Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, in his role as Captain General, Royal Marines, attends a Parade to mark the finale of the 1664 Global Challenge on the Buckingham Palace Forecourt in central London on August 2, 2017.  
After a lifetime of public service by the side of his wife Queen Elizabeth II, Prince Philip finally retires on August 2, 2017,at the age of 96. The Duke of Edinburgh attended a parade of Royal Marines at Buckingham Palace, the last of 22,219 solo public engagements since she ascended to the throne in 1952.
 / AFP PHOTO / POOL / HANNAH MCKAY        (Photo credit should read HANNAH MCKAY/AFP/Getty Images)
HANNAH MCKAY/AFP/Getty Images
Britain's Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, in his role as Captain General, Royal Marines, attends a Parade to mark the finale of the 1664 Global Challenge on the Buckingham Palace Forecourt in central London on August 2, 2017. After a lifetime of public service by the side of his wife Queen Elizabeth II, Prince Philip finally retires on August 2, 2017,at the age of 96. The Duke of Edinburgh attended a parade of Royal Marines at Buckingham Palace, the last of 22,219 solo public engagements since she ascended to the throne in 1952. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / HANNAH MCKAY (Photo credit should read HANNAH MCKAY/AFP/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:39
The life of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh
Caribbean st vincent island volcano eruption Oppmann lkl intl hnk vpx_00001102.png
Caribbean st vincent island volcano eruption Oppmann lkl intl hnk vpx_00001102.png
Now playing
01:01
Caribbean island evacuated ahead of 'imminent' volcano eruption
KCAL/KCBS
Now playing
01:45
Bodycam video shows LAPD arrest the wrong man
Now playing
00:00
Why this new rapid coronavirus test could be a game-changer
screengrab notre dame restoration
CNN
screengrab notre dame restoration
Now playing
03:06
Stunning footage shows restoration work on Notre Dame
CNN
Now playing
05:54
SE Cupp: What two politicians and a 'real' housewife have in common
Former House Speaker John Boehner attends a ceremony to unveil a portrait of himself on Capitol Hill, Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2019 in Washington.
Michael A. McCoy/AP
Former House Speaker John Boehner attends a ceremony to unveil a portrait of himself on Capitol Hill, Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2019 in Washington.
Now playing
02:42
Boehner says Republican colleague held 10-inch knife to his throat outside House floor
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 17:  Representative Matt Gaetz, a Republican from Florida, listens during a markup on H.R. 7120, the "Justice in Policing Act of 2020,"  on June 17, 2020, in Washington, D.C. The House bill would make it easier to prosecute and sue officers and would ban federal officers from using choke holds, bar racial profiling, end "no-knock" search warrants in drug cases, create a national registry for police violations, and require local police departments that get federal funds to conduct bias training.  (Photo by Erin Scott-Pool via Getty Images)
Erin Scot/Pool/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 17: Representative Matt Gaetz, a Republican from Florida, listens during a markup on H.R. 7120, the "Justice in Policing Act of 2020," on June 17, 2020, in Washington, D.C. The House bill would make it easier to prosecute and sue officers and would ban federal officers from using choke holds, bar racial profiling, end "no-knock" search warrants in drug cases, create a national registry for police violations, and require local police departments that get federal funds to conduct bias training. (Photo by Erin Scott-Pool via Getty Images)
Now playing
02:10
Attorney for Gaetz associate: I'm sure Gaetz is not feeling very comfortable
Joe Manchin
CNN
Joe Manchin
Now playing
02:03
'I never thought in my life ...' Why Manchin won't walk away from bipartisanship
(CNN) —  

It’s not just Alabama and Georgia. More states are considering bills that would make virtually all abortions illegal at 6 weeks or less.

But with the debates comes a lot of misinformation about abortions. Here are some of the most common myths, and the facts behind them:

MYTH: Women can still easily get abortions within the legal time frame

Georgia is one of the latest states to enact a so-called “heartbeat law,” meaning virtually all abortions are illegal once a heartbeat is detected.

That can be as early as six weeks, which is before an embryo becomes a fetus, according to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

Several states already have similar laws, including Mississippi and Ohio. And more states, like Missouri and Louisiana, have “heartbeat bills” moving through their state legislatures.

FACT: There are several reasons why many women can’t get abortions within 6 weeks

First, there are biological reasons why a woman might not know she’s pregnant until six weeks. (More on that later.)

When she does know, there are more obstacles that can prevent her from getting an abortion within newer, tougher time limits:

Geography: The number of clinics in the US that specialize in performing abortions keeps dropping – from 381 in 2005 to 272 in 2014, the latest year of available data, according to the Guttmacher Institute, which advocates for reproductive rights.

Six states have only one abortion clinic. Several other states don’t have a clinic for more than 100 miles.

Many women seeking abortions can’t afford the transportation to get there, much less a place to stay if they’re required to wait 24, 48 or 72 hours, as required by some states.

Finances: Abortions can cost anywhere from several hundred dollars to over $2,000, said Dr. Ushma Upadhyay, associate professor at the University of California San Francisco’s Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences.

And with tougher state laws getting passed, more abortion providers are going out of service – which means higher costs for abortions.

In some cases, “clinics must fly in a physician each week to provide abortion care, thus raising the costs for patients,” Upadhyay said.

So can be difficult to impossible for some women to come up with that money before the time limit passes in states with strict abortion laws.

MYTH: Women know they’re pregnant within a month

One state senator who helped pass Alabama’s new abortion law – the strictest in the country – said he believes a woman knows she’s pregnant much sooner than one month.

Republican Sen. Clyde Chambliss repeatedly referred to a “window” of time between conception and when a woman knows for sure that she’s pregnant. He said he believed that time was between about seven and 10 days.

Others say a woman can tell within a month whether she’s pregnant, depending on whether she gets her next period.

FACT: Some clues don’t emerge until after six weeks

There are several reasons why a woman might not know she’s pregnant for well over a month.

In the early weeks of pregnancy, some women experience “breakthrough bleeding” – which can be mistaken for a period.

About 20% to 30% of women experience some type of spotting or bleeding in early pregnancy, according to the National Maternity Hospital in Dublin, Ireland.

And women with ovarian cysts or hormonal imbalances can have irregular periods, said Dr. Jen Villavicencio, an ob-gyn and fellow with the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. It can be especially difficult for women with irregular periods to tell if they’re pregnant.

MYTH: ‘None of my friends or family would ever get an abortion’

This is a common sentiment among people who say they and their loved ones oppose abortion due to religious beliefs.

FACTS: Almost 1 in 4 women get an abortion by age 45. And most of them identify with a religion.

That’s according to the Guttmacher Institute. And the religious demographics may be surprising: More than half of women who get abortions identify as Catholic, mainline Protestant or evangelical Protestant.

MYTH: People wouldn’t need abortions if they were more responsible

FACT: Abstinence works. But birth control methods sometimes fail.

All forms of birth control come with a risk of failure.

People who use condoms, for example, experience a failure rate of about 13%, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Using a birth control pill comes with a failure rate of about 7%.

The failure rate when using some intrauterine devices (IUDs) can be as low as 0.8%.

But those who use a diaphragm experience a 17% failure rate.

MYTH: Women who get abortions don’t care about children

FACT: Most women seeking abortions already have at least one child

According to the CDC, more than 59% of women seeking abortions have already given birth to a child.

One of the most common reasons why low-income mothers seek abortions is so they can continue providing for their children without taking resources away from them, Guttmacher said.

CNN’s Jessica Ravitz contributed to this report.