RENTON, WA - JANUARY 29: A Boeing 737 MAX 8 airliner lifts off for its first flight on January 29, 2016 in Renton, Washington. The 737 MAX is the newest of Boeing
RENTON, WA - JANUARY 29: A Boeing 737 MAX 8 airliner lifts off for its first flight on January 29, 2016 in Renton, Washington. The 737 MAX is the newest of Boeing's most popular airliner featuring more fuel efficient engines and redesigned wings. (Photo by Stephen Brashear/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Stephen Brashear/Getty Images
Now playing
01:40
Pilots confronted Boeing over 737 Max concerns
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
01:48
FBI warns of potential armed protests across country
Senator-elect Tommy Tuberville, a Republican from Alabama, stands for a photo at the US Capitol in Washington, DC, on November 9, 2020. (Photo by Stefani Reynolds / POOL / AFP) (Photo by STEFANI REYNOLDS/POOL/AFP via Getty Images)
Senator-elect Tommy Tuberville, a Republican from Alabama, stands for a photo at the US Capitol in Washington, DC, on November 9, 2020. (Photo by Stefani Reynolds / POOL / AFP) (Photo by STEFANI REYNOLDS/POOL/AFP via Getty Images)
PHOTO: STEFANI REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images
Now playing
03:20
Senator-elect Tommy Tuberville flubs 3 branches of government
MOON TOWNSHIP, PA - SEPTEMBER 22: Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner listen as President Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally at Atlantic Aviation on September 22, 2020 in Moon Township, Pennsylvania. Trump won Pennsylvania by less than a percentage point in 2016 and is currently in a tight race with Democratic nominee, former Vice President Joe Biden. (Photo by Jeff Swensen/Getty Images)
MOON TOWNSHIP, PA - SEPTEMBER 22: Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner listen as President Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally at Atlantic Aviation on September 22, 2020 in Moon Township, Pennsylvania. Trump won Pennsylvania by less than a percentage point in 2016 and is currently in a tight race with Democratic nominee, former Vice President Joe Biden. (Photo by Jeff Swensen/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Jeff Swensen/Getty Images
Now playing
01:55
Where do Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner go from here?
FBI Director Christopher Wray speaks during a virtual news conference at the Department of Justice on October 28, 2020 in Washington, DC.
FBI Director Christopher Wray speaks during a virtual news conference at the Department of Justice on October 28, 2020 in Washington, DC.
PHOTO: Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images
Now playing
03:47
FBI director speaks publicly for first time since Capitol riots
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
03:06
Avlon: This is where Trump failed in historic proportions
PHOTO: POOL
Now playing
00:48
Pence makes surprise visit to Capitol to thank National Guard
PHOTO: Pool
Now playing
03:11
Biden: Real pain overwhelming the real economy
Staffer White House move out
Staffer White House move out
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
01:36
Moving trucks spotted at White House as staffers clean out their desks
Now playing
01:29
Former DHS official: You don't get a mulligan on insurrection
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
03:19
Mudd: Here are my 2 concerns with potential protests
Scott Jennings/Amanda Carpenter split 0113
Scott Jennings/Amanda Carpenter split 0113
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
02:18
Conservative panelists go head-to-head: Are you sorry you voted for Trump?
House impeachment 217
House impeachment 217
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
02:08
See historic moment House reaches enough votes to impeach Trump
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
02:46
Rep. Hoyer: Republicans I've talked to say this action is required
PHOTO: AOC / Instagram
Now playing
01:44
AOC on Capitol riots: Members were 'nearly assassinated'
(CNN) —  

Boeing said Thursday it has finished the development of a software fix to its troubled 737 Max.

The plane maker said in a statement it has flown the aircraft with the updated software on 207 flights for more than 360 hours.

The software heads next to the US Federal Aviation Administration and its counterparts in other countries that want to review it. An FAA spokesman said Thursday afternoon the Boeing materials, including the software, have not yet been submitted.

“We’re committed to providing the FAA and global regulators all the information they need, and to getting it right. We’re making clear and steady progress and are confident that the 737 Max with updated MCAS software will be one of the safest airplanes ever to fly,” Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg said in the statement.

The submission comes ahead of an international gathering of aviation regulators in Dallas next week to discuss the reviews of the Max.

The 737 Max 8 and 9 were grounded worldwide after an Ethiopian Airlines crash two months ago that investigators have described as appearing similar to a Lion Air crash last year. Between the two crashes, 346 people died.

In both accidents, the automated Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System, or MCAS, pushed the planes’ noses down while the pilots struggled to regain control.

The company has said its fix will feed MCAS with data from two, rather than just one, sensor, making the plane less susceptible to a crash because of bad data. It will also make the system less potent, which is expected to prevent the steep dives seen in the two crashes, and provide additional training materials.

“Boeing has developed enhanced training and education materials that are now being reviewed with the FAA, global regulators, and airline customers to support return-to-service and longer-term operations,” the company statement said. “This includes a series of regional customer conferences being conducted around the world.”

Multiple investigations, including the initial crash investigation, are ongoing. Criminal prosecutors, congressional staffers, and the Transportation Department inspector general are reviewing the initial certification of the 737 and the FAA’s processes.

The FAA’s aircraft certification chief, Earl Lawrence, told Congress on Wednesday the agency has been reviewing a preliminary version of the software provided by Boeing.

“I would call it the beta version,” Lawrence said. “The reason why they submitted it to us is so we can stick it in the simulator so we could test it, so we can also look at their system safety analysis and see whether it will appropriately address it.”

A Technical Advisory Board organized by the FAA will participate in the review. That panel includes experts from the Air Force, NASA, Transportation Department and FAA.

Aviation regulators in other countries will complete their own reviews of the software separate from the international Joint Authorities Technical Review, or JATR, the FAA has organized.

That raises the possibility some countries’ regulators could approve the software while others do not deem it safe to fly – and complicate Boeing’s goal of safely returning the plane to the skies.

CNN’s Drew Griffin and Curt Devine contributed to this report.