Facebook VP says 'rules of the internet' are changing_00002817.jpg
Facebook VP says 'rules of the internet' are changing_00002817.jpg
Now playing
01:19
Facebook VP says 'rules of the internet' are changing
A Facebook employee walks by a sign displaying the "like" sign at Facebook's corporate headquarters campus in Menlo Park, California, on October 23, 2019. (Photo by Josh Edelson / AFP) (Photo by JOSH EDELSON/AFP via Getty Images)
PHOTO: Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images
A Facebook employee walks by a sign displaying the "like" sign at Facebook's corporate headquarters campus in Menlo Park, California, on October 23, 2019. (Photo by Josh Edelson / AFP) (Photo by JOSH EDELSON/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
02:36
Facebook to restore news in Australia
Chris, a Trump supporter, reacts to a fact check of a manipulated video shared by the Trump campaign.
PHOTO: CNN
Chris, a Trump supporter, reacts to a fact check of a manipulated video shared by the Trump campaign.
Now playing
03:58
What Trump supporters see on their Facebook feeds
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
02:03
Watch this former exec compare Facebook to Big Tobacco
Screengrab Nick Clegg facebook
PHOTO: CNN
Screengrab Nick Clegg facebook
Now playing
07:34
Facebook exec explains the company's US election actions
PHOTO: Getty Images
Now playing
05:15
Misleading videos shared by Republicans get millions of views
Now playing
02:24
Under questioning, Zuckerberg admits Instagram was a 'competitor'
Now playing
03:31
Congresswoman grills Facebook CEO on copying competitors
PHOTO: From Facebook
Now playing
02:40
Zuckerberg blasts Trump administration for worsening pandemic
Facebook co-founder, Chairman and CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before the House Energy and Commerce Committee in the Rayburn House Office Building on Capitol Hill April 11, 2018 in Washington, DC. This is the second day of testimony before Congress by Zuckerberg, 33, after it was reported that 87 million Facebook users had their personal information harvested by Cambridge Analytica, a British political consulting firm linked to the Trump campaign.  (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
Facebook co-founder, Chairman and CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before the House Energy and Commerce Committee in the Rayburn House Office Building on Capitol Hill April 11, 2018 in Washington, DC. This is the second day of testimony before Congress by Zuckerberg, 33, after it was reported that 87 million Facebook users had their personal information harvested by Cambridge Analytica, a British political consulting firm linked to the Trump campaign. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Now playing
03:33
Facebook meeting 'disappointing,' says ad boycott organizer
This picture taken on July 4, 2019 in Nantes, shows logos of the US online social media and social networking service, Facebook. (Photo by LOIC VENANCE / AFP)        (Photo credit should read LOIC VENANCE/AFP via Getty Images)
PHOTO: LOIC VENANCE/AFP/AFP via Getty Images
This picture taken on July 4, 2019 in Nantes, shows logos of the US online social media and social networking service, Facebook. (Photo by LOIC VENANCE / AFP) (Photo credit should read LOIC VENANCE/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
02:41
He quit Facebook over Zuckerberg's handling of Trump posts. Hear why
PHOTO: Glenn Chapman/AFP/Getty Images/CNN
Now playing
03:38
He says Facebook's Libra is the future. Lawmakers aren't so sure
PHOTO: YouTube/Financial Services Committee
Now playing
02:15
Zuckerberg struggles to explain whether Facebook fact checks political ads
Mark Zuckerberg remained silent after Congressman Barry Loudermilk compared him to President Trump.
Mark Zuckerberg remained silent after Congressman Barry Loudermilk compared him to President Trump.
Now playing
00:43
Watch Zuckerberg react when a lawmaker compares him to Trump
Facebook's CEO Mark Zuckerberg delivers his speech during the VivaTech (Viva Technology) trade fair in Paris, on May 24, 2018. (Photo by GERARD JULIEN / AFP)        (Photo credit should read GERARD JULIEN/AFP/Getty Images)
PHOTO: GERARD JULIEN/AFP/Getty Images
Facebook's CEO Mark Zuckerberg delivers his speech during the VivaTech (Viva Technology) trade fair in Paris, on May 24, 2018. (Photo by GERARD JULIEN / AFP) (Photo credit should read GERARD JULIEN/AFP/Getty Images)
Now playing
03:21
This is how Facebook kills its competition
facebook zuckerberg origin business orig _00011530.jpg
facebook zuckerberg origin business orig _00011530.jpg
Now playing
01:47
It took Facebook 15 years to take over the world. Here's how
(CNN Business) —  

Facebook is raising the wages of contractors in some areas and adding benefits for those doing certain jobs, as it and other tech companies face questions over how such workers are treated.

In a blog post on Monday, Facebook said it will require that partner companies pay these workers a “wage that’s more reflective of local costs of living.”

In the San Francisco Bay Area, New York City and Washington, DC, contractors will receive a minimum wage of $20 an hour. In Seattle, they’ll receive at least $18 an hour.

Facebook has required that contractors be paid a $15 minimum wage since 2015, but according to the post, realized that wasn’t enough in some areas of the United States.

The affected workers are employed by outside vendors and work either part or full-time. They work for Facebook in areas such as content review, security, food services and transportation.

The changes will take effect by mid-2020 in the US. Facebook will work to extend these standards to other countries, the blog post said.

The change in Facebook’s treatment of contractors comes as the tech industry faces pressure to improve conditions for these types of workers. Silicon Valley companies have resisted making them full time employees, as they ultimately hope to replace them with artificial intelligence and other automation technology.

Facebook has added thousands of content reviewers to its workforce to fight the spread of misinformation as well as violent and extremist content. (It recently reported having 15,000 workers doing content moderation, nearly double what it had in April 2018.) At the same time, it’s faced criticism for the treatment of these workers and their working conditions.

Contractors who review content on Facebook will get further benefits. They’ll receive a higher base wage, additional benefits and more supportive programs in light of the type of work they’re doing. These changes will include giving reviewers more control over the content they’re seeing and on-site counseling during all hours of operation.

Facebook is also working to implement requirements like no sub-contracting, overtime pay and premiums for nightshifts and weekends and healthcare that meets that standards of the Affordable Care Act.

It will also start a bi-annual audit and compliance program for content review teams and launch a whistleblower hotline for contractors.

In April, Google (GOOG) announced that it would require that temporary and contracted workers receive full benefits from companies it works with in the coming years. The move came after months of protests from Google (GOOG)’s “shadow workforce” of temporary workers, vendors and contractors who said they were treated unfairly.