Getty Images
Now playing
02:11
Facebook bans some high-profile users
Now playing
04:02
General's response to Gaetz's question leaves him shaking his head
Singer Britney Spears attends the 29th Annual GLAAD Media Awards at the Beverly Hilton on April 12, 2018 in Beverly Hills, California. / AFP PHOTO / VALERIE MACON        (Photo credit should read VALERIE MACON/AFP via Getty Images)
Valerie Macon/AFP/Getty Images
Singer Britney Spears attends the 29th Annual GLAAD Media Awards at the Beverly Hilton on April 12, 2018 in Beverly Hills, California. / AFP PHOTO / VALERIE MACON (Photo credit should read VALERIE MACON/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
02:53
Britney Spears asks court to end her conservatorship
KGO
Now playing
03:37
San Francisco's crime surge fueled by Covid-19, poverty and homelessness
jeffrey toobin scotus cheerleader free speech case reax nr vpx_00000000.png
jeffrey toobin scotus cheerleader free speech case reax nr vpx_00000000.png
Now playing
01:56
Toobin: SCOTUS realizes this is just how high schoolers talk
Now playing
03:03
CNN reporter: Jared and Ivanka have made a calculated decision
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 28: Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse, D-R.I., attends the Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing in Dirksen Senate Office Building on April 28, 2021 in Washington, DC. Ketanji Brown Jackson, nominee to be U.S. Circuit Judge for the District of Columbia Circuit, and Candace Jackson-Akiwumi, nominee to be U.S. Circuit Judge for the Seventh Circuit, testified on the first panel. (Photo By Tom Williams-Pool/Getty Images)
Tom Williams/Pool/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 28: Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse, D-R.I., attends the Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing in Dirksen Senate Office Building on April 28, 2021 in Washington, DC. Ketanji Brown Jackson, nominee to be U.S. Circuit Judge for the District of Columbia Circuit, and Candace Jackson-Akiwumi, nominee to be U.S. Circuit Judge for the Seventh Circuit, testified on the first panel. (Photo By Tom Williams-Pool/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:28
Sen. Whitehouse faces questions over private beach club membership
CNN
Now playing
02:23
'Ridiculous': Schumer slams Republicans for blocking Democrats' voting rights bill
Manatee County
Now playing
04:59
Two people are dead after Covid-19 outbreak hit a government building
CNN
Now playing
02:16
John King on US economy: Prices are going up big time
ABC
Now playing
01:45
'Bachelorette' opens up about being sexual assault survivor
Getty Images
Now playing
03:59
He inspired an Oscar-nominated film. Now, he could face life in prison
HBO
Now playing
02:15
Pakistan PM faces backlash for claim about sexual violence
A NYPD officer patrols Times Square as rain falls on March 28, 2020 in New York City. - US President Donald Trump said on March 28, 2020 that he's considering a short-term quarantine of New York state, New Jersey, and parts of Connecticut. (Photo by Kena Betancur / AFP) (Photo by KENA BETANCUR/AFP via Getty Images)
Kena Betancur/AFP/Getty Images
A NYPD officer patrols Times Square as rain falls on March 28, 2020 in New York City. - US President Donald Trump said on March 28, 2020 that he's considering a short-term quarantine of New York state, New Jersey, and parts of Connecticut. (Photo by Kena Betancur / AFP) (Photo by KENA BETANCUR/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
06:36
CNN rides along with NYPD as crime rates spike
US President Donald Trump listens during a meeting with Arkansas Governor Asa Hutchinson (R) and Kansas Governor Laura Kelly (L), on May 20, 2020, in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington, DC. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP) (Photo by BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images)
BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/AFP via Getty Images
US President Donald Trump listens during a meeting with Arkansas Governor Asa Hutchinson (R) and Kansas Governor Laura Kelly (L), on May 20, 2020, in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington, DC. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP) (Photo by BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
04:48
Trump wanted to send infected Americans to Guantanamo Bay, book says
Now playing
03:36
They stood up to Trump's lies and now are losing their jobs
CNN
Now playing
03:14
This family's lives will be changed by the child tax credit

Correction: This article has been updated to correct the spelling of The Rev. Michael Pfleger's name.

CNN —  

One week after Facebook banned Minister Louis Farrakhan and others for promoting “violence and hate,” the Nation of Islam leader made anti-Semitic remarks in a Catholic church while insisting that he is not a hateful person.

Farrakhan told those at Saint Sabina Catholic Church in Chicago on Thursday that he is “a hated man today.”

“Saturday, God willing, I’ll be 86 years old. I have never been arrested, no drunken driving,” he said. “What have I done that you would hate me like that?”

Pointing to his mouth, Farrakhan said: “It’s this that they fear. I don’t have no army. I just know the truth. And I’m here to separate the good Jews from the Satanic Jews.”

The Nation of Islam billed Farrakhan’s speech as a response to the “public outrage over the unprecedented and unwarranted lifetime ban.”

But St. Sabina’s invitation to Farrakhan drew sharp rebuke from the Illinois Holocaust Museum. The organization criticized the church, saying the speech would provide a “platform for bigotry.”

Facebook owns Instagram and its ban applies to both social media platforms.

Saint Sabina live-streamed Farrakhan’s speech on its website and Facebook page, despite the ban on the controversial leader.

Farrakhan said he used the social media platform “with respect.” “I never allow those who follow me to become vile as those who speak evil of us,” he said.

Farrakhan denied being misogynistic and homophobic. He said, “The white people who think I’m a hater,” don’t know him.

“No one that is with me has ever committed a crime against the Jewish people, black people, white people, no matter what your color is.”

But Farrakhan made several anti-Semitic statements during his speech, accusing Judaism of promoting pedophilia and saying that Jews do not like him because he “exposes their hatred of Jesus.”

On Friday, Jonathan Greenblatt, CEO of the Anti-Defamation League said that he was “deeply disappointing that he was given a platform in a church to spew his hateful vitriol.”

“It’s typical that even in defending himself against claims of anti-Semitism, Louis Farrakhan has once again invoked more anti-Jewish hatred. His remarks last night were vintage Farrakhan: A litany of tropes about how ‘Satanic Jews’ are corrupting society with immoral acts and that Jewish writings, ‘promote pedophilia.’”

A free speech issue?

Before the speech, Ishmael Muhammad, an aide to Farrakhan said: “This unjust sanction deprives the American public and others of the basic right to know.

“It is an abridgement of free speech in a country that presents itself as a democracy and does no public good,” he said.

The Rev. Michael Pfleger, pastor of Saint Sabina, said he has known and worked with Farrakhan for 30 years and has denounced Facebook for banning the controversial leader.

“This is a free-speech issue,” Pfleger told CNN. “I don’t agree with everything Minister Farrakhan has said. I don’t agree with anyone on everything, but we are in a dangerous time when we can no longer have dialogue without demonizing one another.”

Before the address, Pfleger said: Farrakhan “has been a bold voice against injustice done against black people in this country and his voice deserves and needs to be heard.”

Some groups are pushing back on Farrakhan’s appearance

But one local Jewish-led organization is blasting Saint Sabina for hosting Farrakhan, who has a long history of anti-Semitic statements.

“The Holocaust started with hatred and prejudice,” said Fritzie Fritzshall, an Auschwitz survivor and president of the Illinois Holocaust Museum in Skokie, Illinois. The museum is holding a press conference Thursday to protest Saint Sabina’s decision to host Farrakhan.

“When community leaders like Father Pfleger provide a platform for bigotry and anti-Semitism, it increases the threat against all of humanity,” Fritzshall said.

Phil Andrew, the Archdiocese of Chicago’s director of violence prevention, was expected to be among those at the Illinois Holocaust Museum denouncing Saint Sabina for hosting Farrakhan, according to a museum spokesman.

In a statement, the Archdiocese of Chicago that its leader, Cardinal Blase Cupich, was not consulted before Pfleger announced the event with Farrakhan and that the archdiocese is “not sponsoring” the speech.

The Anti-Defamation League said they will be monitoring Farrakhan’s speech. The watchdog group has called Farrakhan, who has led the Nation of Islam since 1977, “quite possibly America’s most popular anti-Semite.”

“Farrakhan has alleged that the Jewish people were responsible for the slave trade and that they conspire to control the government, the media and Hollywood, as well as various black individuals and organizations,” the ADL says.

The minister has long been a controversial figure

The Southern Poverty Law Center lists Farrakhan and his Nation of Islam as a “hate group,” saying that the “deeply racist, antisemitic and anti-gay rhetoric of its leaders, including top minister Louis Farrakhan, have earned the NOI a prominent position in the ranks of organized hate.”

In a speech in Chicago in 2018, Farrakhan said, “the powerful Jews are my enemy. “White folks are going down. And Satan is going down. And Farrakhan, by God’s grace, has pulled the cover off of that Satanic Jew and I’m here to say your time is up, your world is through.”

Pfleger, who has long worked with African-American leaders in Chicago, said Farrakhan and the Nation of Islam are respected locally for their anti-violence and anti-drug campaigns.

“Nobody has done more in the saving of young black men’s lives and turning around lives than the Nation of Islam. His respect in the African-American community has been consistent.”

But Pfleger said emails and phone calls have poured in this week criticizing him for hosting Farrakhan and threatening to withdraw donations to the church and its programs.

“If you would have heard and seen the stuff sent and spoken to me over this last week,” he said. “I was shocked – and I have gotten a lot of hate in my life. People have told me that they will destroy me.”

CNN’s Darran Simon contributed to this report.