ILULISSAT, GREENLAND - JULY 20:  An iceberg floats through the water on July 20, 2013 in Ilulissat, Greenland. As Greenlanders adapt to the changing climate and go on with their lives, researchers from the National Science Foundation and other organizations are studying the phenomena of the melting glaciers and its long-term ramifications for the rest of the world. In recent years, sea level rise in places such as Miami Beach has led to increased street flooding and prompted leaders such as New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg to propose a $19.5 billion plan to boost the citys capacity to withstand future extreme weather events by, among other things, devising mechanisms to withstand flooding.  (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images) (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
ILULISSAT, GREENLAND - JULY 20: An iceberg floats through the water on July 20, 2013 in Ilulissat, Greenland. As Greenlanders adapt to the changing climate and go on with their lives, researchers from the National Science Foundation and other organizations are studying the phenomena of the melting glaciers and its long-term ramifications for the rest of the world. In recent years, sea level rise in places such as Miami Beach has led to increased street flooding and prompted leaders such as New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg to propose a $19.5 billion plan to boost the citys capacity to withstand future extreme weather events by, among other things, devising mechanisms to withstand flooding. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images) (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Joe Raedle/Getty Images Europe/Getty Images
Now playing
02:24
Undeniable climate change facts
A 2x2 grid split screen showing Donald Trump and Joe Biden and energy industry equipment.
A 2x2 grid split screen showing Donald Trump and Joe Biden and energy industry equipment.
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
03:09
The future of renewable energy could look very different under Biden
Now playing
03:36
Could this be the cure to our plastic problem?
exp solar photovoltaics energy perovskites spc intl_00014204.jpg
exp solar photovoltaics energy perovskites spc intl_00014204.jpg
Now playing
02:45
This material could transform the solar energy sector
Now playing
02:39
Shipping industry adapts to stricter fuel regulations
Now playing
03:46
Rush shipping is often free. But the environment could be paying for it
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 13:  Teenage Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg delivers brief remarks surrounded by other student environmental advocates during a strike to demand action be taken on climate change outside the White House on September 13, 2019 in Washington, DC. The strike is part of Thunberg
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 13: Teenage Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg delivers brief remarks surrounded by other student environmental advocates during a strike to demand action be taken on climate change outside the White House on September 13, 2019 in Washington, DC. The strike is part of Thunberg's six day visit to Washington ahead of the Global Climate Strike scheduled for September 20. (Photo by Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images
Now playing
02:25
Meet the teen changing the game for climate change
Ubiquitous Energy solar glass
Ubiquitous Energy solar glass
PHOTO: Natalia V. Osipova
Now playing
02:32
This glass could turn skyscrapers into power generators
SEATTLE, WA - JUNE 18: Amazon.com founder and CEO Jeff Bezos presents the company
SEATTLE, WA - JUNE 18: Amazon.com founder and CEO Jeff Bezos presents the company's first smartphone, the Fire Phone, on June 18, 2014 in Seattle, Washington. The much-anticipated device is available for pre-order today and is available exclusively with AT&T service. (Photo by David Ryder/Getty Images)
PHOTO: David Ryder/Getty Images
Now playing
01:44
Jeff Bezos commits $10 billion to climate change fight
Now playing
01:04
This car's headlamps are made out of McDonald's coffee
PHOTO: Heliogen
Now playing
02:48
This energy startup has made a solar breakthrough
PHOTO: Tulane University
Now playing
01:25
Apple's Tim Cook says his generation failed on climate change
PHOTO: Adidas
Now playing
01:12
These Adidas running shoes are 100% recyclable
PHOTO: Photo Illustration: Getty Images / Loop / CNN
Now playing
03:50
How the world's biggest brands plan to end garbage
Now playing
01:30
5 ways to cut your plastic waste
Now playing
00:00
Why climate change worries Coca-Cola, Apple and Nike
(CNN Business) —  

Amsterdam is handing out perks including free charging stations to residents who help rid the city’s streets of polluting cars.

The Dutch city announced this week that it will gradually expand a crackdown on dirty vehicles that will culminate in a ban on gasoline and diesel-powered cars in 2030.

To help make the transition easier on residents, the city is offering some powerful incentives.

Electric car owners that don’t have their own charging station at home will be able to ask the city to install one for free at a location of their choosing, provided it’s accessible to the public.

“There will be subsidy and exemption schemes, so that you can, for example, receive an allowance for buying another, clean mode of transport,” the city’s officials said in a statement.

Among the other benefits available to electric car owners are parking permits.

Amsterdam is the latest in a series of European cities to restrict polluting vehicles with the aim of improving air quality and reducing carbon emissions.

Last month, London began charging steep fees in the city center on cars that can’t meet tough emissions standards. Paris plans to ban diesel vehicles by 2024, followed by gasoline cars in 2030.

Hamburg became the first German city to ban older diesel cars from some streets in May 2018, after the country’s top court ruled such bans are legal. Other German cities followed with similar restrictions.

Countries are also taking action. The United Kingdom wants to ban sales of new gasoline and diesel cars starting in 2040. China, India, France and Norway have similar plans.

Amsterdam has already banned all diesel commercial vehicles and camper vans built before 2000, diesel taxis built before 2009 as well as buses that are more than 14 years old.

Diesel cars built before 2005 will be pulled off the city’s roads starting next year.

Amsterdam struggles with air pollution despite being the cycling capital of Europe. Overall air pollution has decreased over the past decade but some busy streets still exceed EU standards.

The average resident will have their life cut short by more than a year because of dirty air, according to the city. Globally, 3.6 million people die each year due to pollution caused by fossil fuels, according to a recent study.

Rosanne Roobeek contributed to this article.