Opinion: Children are paying the highest price in central Mali's insecurity

Maimouna Barry, 45, with her daughter Hawa, 10. Maimouna lost her youngest daughter during the attack on her ancestral village of Ogossagou-Peulh in Bankass, Mopti region. Seven-year-old Aminata died while trapped inside the family home when flames began to consume it.

Eliane Luthi is UNICEF's Chief Communication officer for Mali. She recently visited the survivors of the Ogossagou massacre in which 134 people died last month. The Malian government resigned Friday in the wake of the massacre.
Luthi, an advocate for children's and women's rights, writes a first-person account of her visit to the children and their families in the aftermath of the attacks.

The views expressed in this commentary are hers.

(CNN)On the night of 23 March, the village of Ogossagou was attacked, leaving 46 children dead, according to United Nations estimates.

One of them was Maimouna Barry's youngest daughter Aminata, 7, who died while trapped inside the family home when flames began to consume it. When her body was found, Maimouna, 45, said she couldn't bring herself to look.
Maimouna showed me what was left of her family home and the corner store she used to run. Where there used to be mats, chairs, and a corner store full of rice, sugar, and soap, there is nothing but ashes.
Aminata was meant to start school this year. She was very smart, Maimouna told me. Aminata would help her mother with the store, serving clients that came early in the morning to buy sugar for breakfast.
    Maimouna Barry, 45, with her daughter Hawa, 10. Maimouna lost her youngest daughter during the attack on Ogossagou-Peulh in Bankass, Mopti region.
    She knew how to count up to 500, but if clients wanted to buy more than 500 CFA (West African francs) worth of goods, she'd tell them they would have to wait for her mother to come back. In