04:26 - Source: CNN
Coast Guard officer charged with planning mass attack
Washington CNN —  

Domestic terror suspect Christopher Hasson, who is accused of planning a terror attack on politicians and media figures, also allegedly searched the internet for the home addresses of two Supreme Court justices as well as the best gun to kill African-Americans, according to court documents filed Tuesday.

Hasson pleaded not guilty in federal court last month to to weapon and drug charges that prosecutors say were connected to a plot to murder Democratic and media figures. Prosecutors said he wanted to conduct a mass killing and described his white supremacist views in previous court documents.

The new documents reveal that Hasson conducted an internet search for “are Supreme Court justices protected” about two weeks before searching for the home addresses of the two unnamed justices.

Prosecutors also allege in the court filing that Hasson’s “internet search history lays bare his views on race.”

According to the court filing, Hasson searched for the “best” gun with which to kill African-Americans, “after which he visited various firearm sales websites.”

They say in August 2017 he searched for “white homeland” and “when are whites going to wake up.” A few months later, he allegedly searched for “please god let there be a race war.”

The details in the new court filing were first reported by counterterrorism expert Seamus Hughes and the Program on Extremism at George Washington University.

Hasson was first indicted in February on charges of unlawful possession of two improperly registered silencers, possession of a narcotic opioid and possession of 17 firearms as an unlawful user and addict of a controlled substance. If convicted on all four counts, he could receive 31 years in prison.

He is due back in court Thursday as the government continues to press for him to be held in custody. Prosecutors say Hasson “continues to pose a serious danger and must be detained pending trial.”

CNN’s Jessica Schneider and David Shortell contributed to this report.