01:25 - Source: CNN
Scenes from the Notre Dame Cathedral fire
The steeple of the landmark Notre-Dame Cathedral collapses as the cathedral is engulfed in flames in central Paris on April 15, 2019. - A huge fire swept through the roof of the famed Notre-Dame Cathedral in central Paris on April 15, 2019, sending flames and huge clouds of grey smoke billowing into the sky. The flames and smoke plumed from the spire and roof of the gothic cathedral, visited by millions of people a year. A spokesman for the cathedral told AFP that the wooden structure supporting the roof was being gutted by the blaze. (Photo by Geoffroy VAN DER HASSELT / AFP)        (Photo credit should read GEOFFROY VAN DER HASSELT/AFP/Getty Images)
GEOFFROY VAN DER HASSELT/AFP/AFP/Getty Images
The steeple of the landmark Notre-Dame Cathedral collapses as the cathedral is engulfed in flames in central Paris on April 15, 2019. - A huge fire swept through the roof of the famed Notre-Dame Cathedral in central Paris on April 15, 2019, sending flames and huge clouds of grey smoke billowing into the sky. The flames and smoke plumed from the spire and roof of the gothic cathedral, visited by millions of people a year. A spokesman for the cathedral told AFP that the wooden structure supporting the roof was being gutted by the blaze. (Photo by Geoffroy VAN DER HASSELT / AFP) (Photo credit should read GEOFFROY VAN DER HASSELT/AFP/Getty Images)
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01:25
Scenes from the Notre Dame Cathedral fire
Smoke rises in front of the altar cross at Notre-Dame Cathedral in Paris on April 15, 2019, after a fire engulfed the building. - A huge fire swept through the roof of the famed Notre-Dame Cathedral in central Paris on April 15, 2019, sending flames and huge clouds of grey smoke billowing into the sky. The flames and smoke plumed from the spire and roof of the gothic cathedral, visited by millions of people a year. A spokesman for the cathedral told AFP that the wooden structure supporting the roof was being gutted by the blaze. (Photo by PHILIPPE WOJAZER / POOL / AFP)        (Photo credit should read PHILIPPE WOJAZER/AFP/Getty Images)
Philippe Wojazer/AFP/Getty Images
Smoke rises in front of the altar cross at Notre-Dame Cathedral in Paris on April 15, 2019, after a fire engulfed the building. - A huge fire swept through the roof of the famed Notre-Dame Cathedral in central Paris on April 15, 2019, sending flames and huge clouds of grey smoke billowing into the sky. The flames and smoke plumed from the spire and roof of the gothic cathedral, visited by millions of people a year. A spokesman for the cathedral told AFP that the wooden structure supporting the roof was being gutted by the blaze. (Photo by PHILIPPE WOJAZER / POOL / AFP) (Photo credit should read PHILIPPE WOJAZER/AFP/Getty Images)
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Images show damage inside Notre Dame Cathedral
Smoke billows as fire engulfs the spire of Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, France April 15, 2019. REUTERS/Benoit Tessier
Benoit Tessier/Reuters
Smoke billows as fire engulfs the spire of Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, France April 15, 2019. REUTERS/Benoit Tessier
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See the moment Notre Dame's iconic spire falls
A woman reacts as she watches the flames engulf the roof of the  Notre-Dame Cathedral in Paris on April 15, 2019. - A huge fire swept through the roof of the famed Notre-Dame Cathedral in central Paris on April 15, 2019, sending flames and huge clouds of grey smoke billowing into the sky. The flames and smoke plumed from the spire and roof of the gothic cathedral, visited by millions of people a year. A spokesman for the cathedral told AFP that the wooden structure supporting the roof was being gutted by the blaze. (Photo by Geoffroy VAN DER HASSELT / AFP)        (Photo credit should read GEOFFROY VAN DER HASSELT/AFP/Getty Images)
Geoffroy Van Der Hasselt/AFP/Getty Images
A woman reacts as she watches the flames engulf the roof of the Notre-Dame Cathedral in Paris on April 15, 2019. - A huge fire swept through the roof of the famed Notre-Dame Cathedral in central Paris on April 15, 2019, sending flames and huge clouds of grey smoke billowing into the sky. The flames and smoke plumed from the spire and roof of the gothic cathedral, visited by millions of people a year. A spokesman for the cathedral told AFP that the wooden structure supporting the roof was being gutted by the blaze. (Photo by Geoffroy VAN DER HASSELT / AFP) (Photo credit should read GEOFFROY VAN DER HASSELT/AFP/Getty Images)
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Hear crowds sing hymns outside Notre Dame
French Prime Minister Edouard Philippe (L), and French President Emmanuel Macron (3rd L) gather in near the entrance of the Notre-Dame de Paris Cathedral in Paris, as flames engulf its roof on April 15, 2019. - A huge fire swept through the roof of the famed Notre-Dame Cathedral in central Paris on April 15, 2019, sending flames and huge clouds of grey smoke billowing into the sky. The flames and smoke plumed from the spire and roof of the gothic cathedral, visited by millions of people a year. A spokesman for the cathedral told AFP that the wooden structure supporting the roof was being gutted by the blaze. (Photo by PHILIPPE WOJAZER / POOL / AFP)        (Photo credit should read PHILIPPE WOJAZER/AFP/Getty Images)
Philippe Wojazer/AFP/Getty Images
French Prime Minister Edouard Philippe (L), and French President Emmanuel Macron (3rd L) gather in near the entrance of the Notre-Dame de Paris Cathedral in Paris, as flames engulf its roof on April 15, 2019. - A huge fire swept through the roof of the famed Notre-Dame Cathedral in central Paris on April 15, 2019, sending flames and huge clouds of grey smoke billowing into the sky. The flames and smoke plumed from the spire and roof of the gothic cathedral, visited by millions of people a year. A spokesman for the cathedral told AFP that the wooden structure supporting the roof was being gutted by the blaze. (Photo by PHILIPPE WOJAZER / POOL / AFP) (Photo credit should read PHILIPPE WOJAZER/AFP/Getty Images)
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Emmanuel Macron: We will rebuild Notre Dame
TOPSHOT - Flames and smoke are seen billowing from the roof at Notre-Dame Cathedral in Paris on April 15, 2019. - A fire broke out at the landmark Notre-Dame Cathedral in central Paris, potentially involving renovation works being carried out at the site, the fire service said.Images posted on social media showed flames and huge clouds of smoke billowing above the roof of the gothic cathedral, the most visited historic monument in Europe. (Photo by Patrick ANIDJAR / AFP)        (Photo credit should read PATRICK ANIDJAR/AFP/Getty Images)
PATRICK ANIDJAR/AFP/Getty Images
TOPSHOT - Flames and smoke are seen billowing from the roof at Notre-Dame Cathedral in Paris on April 15, 2019. - A fire broke out at the landmark Notre-Dame Cathedral in central Paris, potentially involving renovation works being carried out at the site, the fire service said.Images posted on social media showed flames and huge clouds of smoke billowing above the roof of the gothic cathedral, the most visited historic monument in Europe. (Photo by Patrick ANIDJAR / AFP) (Photo credit should read PATRICK ANIDJAR/AFP/Getty Images)
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Cuomo: We are watching history be destroyed in real-time
Crowds look on as flames and smoke billow from the roof at Notre-Dame Cathedral in Paris on April 15, 2019. - A fire broke out at the landmark Notre-Dame Cathedral in central Paris, potentially involving renovation works being carried out at the site, the fire service said.Images posted on social media showed flames and huge clouds of smoke billowing above the roof of the gothic cathedral, the most visited historic monument in Europe. (Photo by ERIC FEFERBERG / AFP)
ERIC FEFERBERG/AFP
Crowds look on as flames and smoke billow from the roof at Notre-Dame Cathedral in Paris on April 15, 2019. - A fire broke out at the landmark Notre-Dame Cathedral in central Paris, potentially involving renovation works being carried out at the site, the fire service said.Images posted on social media showed flames and huge clouds of smoke billowing above the roof of the gothic cathedral, the most visited historic monument in Europe. (Photo by ERIC FEFERBERG / AFP)
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French ambassador to US: Words can't describe our loss
TOPSHOT - Smoke and flames rise during a fire at the landmark Notre-Dame Cathedral in central Paris on April 15, 2019, potentially involving renovation works being carried out at the site, the fire service said. (Photo by FRANCOIS GUILLOT / AFP)
FRANCOIS GUILLOT/AFP
TOPSHOT - Smoke and flames rise during a fire at the landmark Notre-Dame Cathedral in central Paris on April 15, 2019, potentially involving renovation works being carried out at the site, the fire service said. (Photo by FRANCOIS GUILLOT / AFP)
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Smoke and flames rise during a fire at the landmark Notre-Dame Cathedral in central Paris on April 15, 2019, potentially involving renovation works being carried out at the site, the fire service said. - A major fire broke out at the landmark Notre-Dame Cathedral in central Paris sending flames and huge clouds of grey smoke billowing into the sky, the fire service said. The flames and smoke plumed from the spire and roof of the gothic cathedral, visited by millions of people a year, where renovations are currently underway. (Photo by Philippe LOPEZ / AFP)        (Photo credit should read PHILIPPE LOPEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
PHILIPPE LOPEZ/AFP/Getty Images
Smoke and flames rise during a fire at the landmark Notre-Dame Cathedral in central Paris on April 15, 2019, potentially involving renovation works being carried out at the site, the fire service said. - A major fire broke out at the landmark Notre-Dame Cathedral in central Paris sending flames and huge clouds of grey smoke billowing into the sky, the fire service said. The flames and smoke plumed from the spire and roof of the gothic cathedral, visited by millions of people a year, where renovations are currently underway. (Photo by Philippe LOPEZ / AFP) (Photo credit should read PHILIPPE LOPEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
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(CNN) —  

Big tech companies have spent the better part of two years telling us how they’re trying to fix their misinformation problem.

But their efforts to increase interest in live content is adding to it.

On Monday, as the Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris burned, YouTube suggested the fire was linked to the September 11 terrorist attacks.

Those watching the live video feeds posted by reputable news outlets, including NBC News and France 24, were shown an information box with facts about the 2001 attacks. YouTube normally places the boxes next to videos that include topics often subject to misinformation and conspiracy theories, such as the moon landing.

A YouTube spokesperson said on Monday that the feature was “triggered algorithmically and our systems sometimes make the wrong call.”

YouTube fixed the error after an hour or so, but it was yet another example of a live content misstep made by tech companies this month.

The companies’ enthusiasm for users to engage in live experiences, whether it’s a Facebook Live broadcast or comments on real-time YouTube videos, is creating more opportunity for misinformation, hate and propaganda to flourish – the very issues the companies are trying to tackle.

Hany Farid, a professor at Dartmouth College and digital forensics expert, told CNN Business that live content is much harder for social media companies to police.

“As if they didn’t have enough problems already, it increases the level of complexity,” Farid said.

After the suspect in last month’s terrorist attack at two New Zealand mosques streamed the massacre live on Facebook, the company said it would consider limiting who could broadcast live in the future – perhaps by preventing people who had broken Facebook’s rules in the past from going live. The company failed to stop the livestream of the video as it unfolded, even though it has hired thousands of human moderators and invested in artificial intelligence systems to weed out content that violates its content rules.

Last week, when the US House of Representatives streamed a congressional hearing on hate and social media live on YouTube, the company was forced to shut down its live comments feature due to an influx of hateful posts. The irony was not lost on Representative Jerry Nadler, the chair of the committee. “This just illustrates part of the problem we are dealing with,” he told the committee at the time.

That YouTube’s latest mistake on Monday was caused by a feature the company designed to fight misinformation only adds to the issue.

But the fact that cracking down on live content is presenting new challenges shouldn’t be a surprise, Farid said. “There’s an immediacy [with live video] that is going to create problems.”

After the New Zealand attack, some critics suggested Facebook put a delay on live videos. But Guy Rosen, Facebook’s VP of product management, said in a blog post last month that won’t solve the problem.

“There are millions of Live broadcasts daily, which means a delay would not help address the problem due to the sheer number of videos,” Rosen wrote.

He also noted the benefits to live streaming, such as helping first responders get alerts in real time.

In a recent interview with ABC News, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg argued livestreaming still offers a net positive. He said the experience of connecting people to others in this way is “magical.”

When asked about the idea of delaying livestreams, Zuckerberg told ABC that would “fundamentally break what livestreaming is for people.”

“Most people are livestreaming, you know, a birthday party or hanging out with friends when they can’t be together,” he added.

YouTube on Monday did not provide any information about the Notre Dame mistake other than to blame its algorithms. But learning these details could provide important insight into the scale of the challenges the platforms face.

When Facebook received widespread criticism for failing to stop the livestream of the New Zealand attack, it later revealed that it had prevented the video from being uploaded again more than 1.2 million times in first 24 hours after the massacre.

The staggering figure only underlines the breadth of the challenge faced by Facebook, YouTube and any other company not actively curating content.

“I think for a long time people thought, ‘This digital world might be bad but doesn’t have real-world consequences,’” Farid said. “But we are seeing now that isn’t true.”