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(CNN) —  

Hilary Fetch is pretty sure she broke her VHS tape of “The Lion King” from watching it one too many times.

And Annie Cohen still looks back fondly at the hours she spent in front of the TV devouring “Hannah Montana” and “The Suite Life of Zack and Cody.”

If it’s nostalgia they crave, they’ll get to bask in it with the launch of Disney+.

No more sneaking away during homework time to get their fix. For millennials like Fetch and Cohen, who have long cut the cable cord, the streaming service is bringing back their fondest childhood shows – and long trips down memory lane.

“I know a slew of people that are Disney fanatics,” Fetch, 27, said. “Having all their Disney favorites in one place will certainly be a major attraction to said fanatics.”

Millennials prefer streaming

Millennials love streaming. The content is always at their fingertips and often comes with few, if any, ads.

One survey found that 36 percent of 18- to 29-year-olds said they were likely to subscribe to the new Disney streaming service, which will offer classics ranging from “Kim Possible” to “Lilo and Stitch.”

“I loved Disney as a kid,” Cohen, 21, said. “I watched the movies a lot and I watched almost exclusively Disney Channel.”

Now, however, most of what she consumes is on streaming services such Hulu and Netflix.

So, to people like her, Disney+ may seem like a godsend: it offers the best of both worlds.

Disney’s a favorite too

Mary McGill, 23, remembers the hundreds of DVDs and VHS tapes in her childhood home.

“I would just sit there and watch them on repeat,” McGill said of movies like “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs” and “The Little Mermaid.”

She often finds herself babysitting her nine nieces and nephews. She’ll consider subscribing to Disney+ because it would make it easier for her to find family-friendly content without the clutter of DVDs and VHS tapes.

“Disney movies do a really good job at giving you a good sense of hope and (tell you that) the ability to have an imagination is not a bad thing,” she said.

Plus, McGill added, she finds even the new Disney content relatable and entertaining.

… but there are too many streaming services

But while they’re pumped about the sweet nostalgia fix that awaits, they’re also frustrated with the growing number of streaming services.

“I think it’s a smart move on (Disney) because they’re taking a lot of content away from Netflix, but as a consumer I’m kind of annoyed,” Cohen said.

Although she said she’ll probably end up subscribing to Disney’s service, she isn’t thrilled at the idea of paying another monthly fee.

Though Disney has set an initial monthly fee of $6.99, the company could eventually raise prices like Netflix did when it started churning out more original content.

“I feel like (Disney+) is going to get a lot more expensive, especially when they get more original shows,” Cohen said.

Still, a couple bucks a month might be worth it to experience the wonder of childhood once again.