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(CNN) —  

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand on Tuesday did something most politicians aren’t willing to do: Unequivocally admit when they think they’ve made a mistake.

Gillibrand came into CNN’s town hall with a long list of progressive policies that she regularly touts on the campaign trail. But she also stepped into the spotlight with a record that includes conservative positions on immigration and guns, something that has followed her throughout her 2020 campaign and raised questions about her progressive credentials.

Gillibrand looked to both apologize for her past record while also using that history as proof of her ability to reach out and connect with conservative voters on Tuesday night.

The US senator from New York, who officially launched her campaign in March in outside President Donald Trump’s eponymous hotel in Manhattan, has so far failed to break out of the large and growing pack of Democrats running for president in 2020, but the CNN town hall offered Gillibrand a platform to do just that.

’It’s really important … to admit when you’re wrong’

Gillibrand said on Tuesday that she was “ashamed” of her past conservative views on immigration, telling voters that she believes she is in the “right place” right now.

Gillibrand ran and won a House seat near Albany, New York, in 2006 by attacking her Republican opponent from the right on immigration and guns, calling securing the border “a national security priority.”

Gillibrand said her policy positions at the time did not treat people like she would want to be treated.

“I did not do that as a House member. I was ashamed,” she said.

She built on that answer Tuesday night by arguing her ability to admit she is wrong sets her apart from Trump.

“When I was a member of Congress from upstate New York, I was really focused on the priorities of my district. When I became senator of the entire state, I recognized that some of my views really did need to change,” Gillibrand said. “They were not thoughtful enough and didn’t care enough about people outside of the original upstate New York district that I represented. So, I learned.”

She added: “And I think for people who aspire to be president, I think it’s really important that you’re able to admit when you’re wrong and that you’re able to grow and learn and listen and be better, and be stronger. That is something that Donald Trump is unwilling to do. He is unwilling to listen, he is unwilling to admit when he’s wrong. He’s actually incapable of it. And I think it’s one of the reasons why he is such a cowardly president.”

Gillibrand’s more conservative record is one of the key criticisms her candidacy receives from the left, but it shows how the 2020 candidate’s early strategy is to face up to questions about her record and not run away from them, believing that embracing her story and evolution on issues like guns and immigration could win plaudits from caucus-goers in Iowa and convince them that she could win a general election against Trump by appealing to a spectrum of voters.

Past views on guns also a benefit

Gillibrand, in the same hour that she apologized for her past position on immigration, also cast the fact that she once had an A-rating from the National Rifle Association as making her better equipped to talk to gun owners about the need for gun control.

Gillibrand, a mother of two, said the way to reach conservatives on this issue is to make it about family and children.

“I think I can walk into any voter in a red state or a purple state or a blue state, gun owners, NRA members, and say, ‘You do care about a 4-year-old dying on a park bench in Brooklyn, don’t you?’” Gillibrand said. “And the humanity of each person in this country should kick in.”

She added: “And you are going to ask them to imagine that happening to their own child, their own loved one, and their own family. And I think you can change hearts that way.”

Gillibrand said earlier this year that she was “embarrassed” by her past positions on guns. She began to change her position after she became a senator and met with Jennifer Pryear and Alberto Yard, the parents of Nyasia Pryear-Yard, a young woman who was killed in a 2009 shooting in Brooklyn.

“So, I had an A-rating as a House member,” she said in Iowa earlier this year. “I only really looked at guns through the lens of hunting. My mother still shoots the Thanksgiving turkey. But when I became senator, I recognized I had a lot to learn about my state and all of the 20 million I was going to represent.”

’I don’t know’

Rarely do you see a politician cop to not knowing something. But Gillibrand, on two separate occasions on Tuesday night, said she didn’t know the answer to a policy question and pledged to look into it more.

First, when asked about whether she would support mandatory vaccination except in the case of medical exception, Gillibrand said she had not “thought about whether I would make it mandatory.”

“I would need to think about that,” she said. “But I do believe that parents n