US President Donald Trump speaks in the Oval office of the White House in Washington, DC, on February 13, 2019. - Trump hosted his Colombian counterpart, Ivan Duque, at the White House on Wednesday to discuss their campaign to pressure Venezuela
US President Donald Trump speaks in the Oval office of the White House in Washington, DC, on February 13, 2019. - Trump hosted his Colombian counterpart, Ivan Duque, at the White House on Wednesday to discuss their campaign to pressure Venezuela's far left president, Nicolas Maduro, from power. The Trump-Duque talks in the Oval Office, followed by lunch, will give the allies a chance to compare notes just as the standoff between Maduro and opposition leader Juan Guaido heats up over the arrival of mostly US aid shipments. (Photo by Nicholas Kamm / AFP)
PHOTO: NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/AFP/Getty Images
Now playing
03:11
How President Trump mastered the art of deflection
WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 19: Rudy Giuliani holds up a mail-in ballot as he speaks to the press about various lawsuits related to the 2020 election,  inside the Republican National Committee headquarters on November 19, 2020 in Washington, DC. President Donald Trump, who has not been seen publicly in several days, continues to push baseless claims about election fraud and dispute the results of the 2020 United States presidential election. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 19: Rudy Giuliani holds up a mail-in ballot as he speaks to the press about various lawsuits related to the 2020 election, inside the Republican National Committee headquarters on November 19, 2020 in Washington, DC. President Donald Trump, who has not been seen publicly in several days, continues to push baseless claims about election fraud and dispute the results of the 2020 United States presidential election. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Drew Angerer/Getty Images North America/Getty Images
Now playing
02:30
Dominion contemplates next legal move after Giuliani lawsuit
US President Joe Biden delivers remarks before signing an Executive Order in the South Court Auditorium at the White House on January 25, 2021 in Washington, DC. (Photo by JIM WATSON / AFP) (Photo by JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images)
US President Joe Biden delivers remarks before signing an Executive Order in the South Court Auditorium at the White House on January 25, 2021 in Washington, DC. (Photo by JIM WATSON / AFP) (Photo by JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images)
PHOTO: Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images
Now playing
02:50
Biden thinks US can get to 1.5 million vaccine doses daily
TAMPA, FL - AUGUST 29:  U.S. Sen. Rob Portman (R-OH) waves during the third day of the Republican National Convention at the Tampa Bay Times Forum on August 29, 2012 in Tampa, Florida. Former Massachusetts Gov. Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney was nominated as the Republican presidential candidate during the RNC, which is scheduled to conclude August 30.  (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
TAMPA, FL - AUGUST 29: U.S. Sen. Rob Portman (R-OH) waves during the third day of the Republican National Convention at the Tampa Bay Times Forum on August 29, 2012 in Tampa, Florida. Former Massachusetts Gov. Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney was nominated as the Republican presidential candidate during the RNC, which is scheduled to conclude August 30. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Mark Wilson/Getty Images
Now playing
02:16
GOP senator explains why he won't seek reelection
diegal
diegal
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
02:58
Former Republican: We've got a bankrupt party
Now playing
00:00
See Biden sign executive order lifting transgender military ban
WASHINGTON, DC - AUGUST 10:  The Trump International Hotel is shown on August 10, 2017 in Washington, DC.  The hotel, located blocks from the White House, has become both a tourist attraction in the nation
WASHINGTON, DC - AUGUST 10: The Trump International Hotel is shown on August 10, 2017 in Washington, DC. The hotel, located blocks from the White House, has become both a tourist attraction in the nation's capital and also a symbol of President Trump's intermingling of business and politics. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Win McNamee/Getty Images
Now playing
01:56
Why SCOTUS is dismissing emolument cases against Trump
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
02:20
Legal analyst: Dominion's case looks pretty strong
John Avlon 0125
John Avlon 0125
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
03:08
Avlon: The Republicans who stood up to Trump were our bulwark
Now playing
03:19
Some GOP lawmakers are defying Capitol security measures
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
01:17
Sen. Romney: Senate trial after Trump leaving office is constitutional
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
03:25
Biden's HHS secretary pick: If we do this, we will get the pandemic under control
Now playing
07:26
'What research did you do?': Brown presses GOP lawmaker on election fraud claims
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
01:42
Acosta describes covering last day of Trump administration
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 06: Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) attends a press conference with Rep. Andy Levin (D-MI) about their new bill called the EV Freedom Act on Capitol Hill on February 6, 2020 in Washington, DC. The EV Freedom Act is a plan to create a nation wide charging infrastructure for electric vehicles. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 06: Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) attends a press conference with Rep. Andy Levin (D-MI) about their new bill called the EV Freedom Act on Capitol Hill on February 6, 2020 in Washington, DC. The EV Freedom Act is a plan to create a nation wide charging infrastructure for electric vehicles. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Samuel Corum/Getty Images
Now playing
03:35
Rioter charged with threatening to 'assassinate' Ocasio-Cortez, officer
Now playing
02:41
Loyal Texas Trump voters want Biden to be less divisive
(CNN) —  

President Donald Trump said during a meeting with NATO’s secretary general Tuesday that his father was “born in a very wonderful place in Germany.”

Fred Trump was born in the Bronx. His father – Trump’s grandfather – was born in Germany.

Happy International Fact-Checking Day! Trump has made 9,451 false or misleading claims in his first 802 days in office!

That’s according to the invaluable Washington Post Fact Checker which, from the start of Trump’s presidency, has cataloged the mountain of his mistruths.

It’s not new news that the President exaggerates, distorts and outright lies on the regular. This is a feature, not a bug, of not only his presidency but his life. What is news is that, again according to the Fact Checker, the pace at which Trump makes false and misleading claims has rapidly quickened over the past six months or so. Here’s the key bit:

“That’s a pace of 22 fishy claims a day over the past 200 days, a steep climb from the average of nearly 5.9 false or misleading claims a day in Trump’s first year in office.”

Think about that. The President of the United States is AVERAGING 22 false/misleading claims a day for the last 200 days. And that is a rate four times as high as his pace of prevarication in 2017, his first year in office.

Even more concerning is the fact that the place Trump tells the most fibs is at 2020 campaign rallies. The Fact Checker counted 64 – SIXTY-FOUR – false or misleading claims by Trump at a single rally in Grand Rapids, Michigan, last week. (I went through the transcript of that speech; it was a humdinger.)

So, let’s go through what we know:

1) Trump bends – and breaks – the truth more than any other president. Ever.

2) The longer he is president, the more active his penchant for not telling the truth has become.

3) He is at his least truthful during campaign rallies aimed at his 2020 re-election race.

It seems pretty clear based on those three facts that Trump isn’t going to adhere more closely to objective facts and capital “T” truth between now and November 2020. In fact, it seems like a near-certainty that he will lean even further into his creation of a separate reality in which he and his supporters can happily live – facts be damned. And that move will convince his backers that the media is even more fake and even less dependable. Which will further isolate them from the rest of the country (and the world) and further deepening (and worsening) our political divides.

This, to me, will be Trump’s lasting legacy, whether or not he wins a second term in 2020: the active undermining of the idea of truth and facts – and the media as a generally neutral arbiter. In a 2018 Gallup poll, more than six in 10 people said that the “news they read in newspapers, see on television or hear on the radio is biased.” And then there’s this from the Gallup survey: “Of 17 major newspapers, network or cable news stations, or internet news sites evaluated in the survey, Republicans see all but two – Fox News and The Wall Street Journal – as biased.”

That is not by accident. That is the result of a prolonged campaign – led by Trump but not initiated by him – to discredit the media and offer “alternative facts” in the place of plain old facts. (To be clear: The media is not without blame here. We make mistakes. But we correct the mistakes we make and own up to them.) And that lack of trust in not just the media but the broader disagreements about whether objective facts even exist is the sort of thing that threatens the very pillars on which our democracy is built.

If we can’t agree on facts, how can we have a conversation about what the facts tell us about the past, present and future of our country? Answer: We can’t.