CHICAGO, ILLINOIS - MARCH 26: Actor Jussie Smollett leaves the Leighton Courthouse after his court appearance on March 26, 2019 in Chicago, Illinois. This morning in court it was announced that all charges were dropped against the actor.  (Photo by Nuccio DiNuzzo/Getty Images)
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS - MARCH 26: Actor Jussie Smollett leaves the Leighton Courthouse after his court appearance on March 26, 2019 in Chicago, Illinois. This morning in court it was announced that all charges were dropped against the actor. (Photo by Nuccio DiNuzzo/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Nuccio DiNuzzo/Getty Images North America/Getty Images
Now playing
03:10
State's Attorney Kim Foxx defends Smollett decision
PHOTO: CBS
Now playing
01:46
Dr. Birx: Trump presented graphs that I never made
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
03:25
Biden's HHS secretary pick: If we do this, we will get the pandemic under control
Unit photography of CNN 35 year anniversary documentary photographed on Monday, April 20, 2015 in Los Angeles, CA. Subjects were former CNN anchors Larry King and Jim Moret.

Photo by John Nowak/CNN
Unit photography of CNN 35 year anniversary documentary photographed on Monday, April 20, 2015 in Los Angeles, CA. Subjects were former CNN anchors Larry King and Jim Moret. Photo by John Nowak/CNN
PHOTO: John Nowak/CNN
Now playing
02:38
Larry King's CNN legacy
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 06: Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) attends a press conference with Rep. Andy Levin (D-MI) about their new bill called the EV Freedom Act on Capitol Hill on February 6, 2020 in Washington, DC. The EV Freedom Act is a plan to create a nation wide charging infrastructure for electric vehicles. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 06: Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) attends a press conference with Rep. Andy Levin (D-MI) about their new bill called the EV Freedom Act on Capitol Hill on February 6, 2020 in Washington, DC. The EV Freedom Act is a plan to create a nation wide charging infrastructure for electric vehicles. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Samuel Corum/Getty Images
Now playing
03:35
Rioter charged with threatening to 'assassinate' Ocasio-Cortez, officer
Now playing
07:26
'What research did you do?': Brown presses GOP lawmaker on election fraud claims
WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 19: White House coronavirus task force coordinator Dr. Deborah Birx speaks during a White House Coronavirus Task Force press briefing in the James Brady Press Briefing Room at the White House on November 19, 2020 in Washington, DC. The White House held its first Coronavirus Task Force briefing in months as cases of COVID-19 are surging across the country ahead of the Thanksgiving holiday.  (Photo by Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 19: White House coronavirus task force coordinator Dr. Deborah Birx speaks during a White House Coronavirus Task Force press briefing in the James Brady Press Briefing Room at the White House on November 19, 2020 in Washington, DC. The White House held its first Coronavirus Task Force briefing in months as cases of COVID-19 are surging across the country ahead of the Thanksgiving holiday. (Photo by Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images
Now playing
01:15
Birx says she 'always' considered quitting Trump's Covid-19 task force
Now playing
01:33
Chuck Schumer announces timeline for Trump impeachment
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
02:53
'We're left high and dry': Vulnerable seniors struggle to get vaccine
Registered nurse Irene Musni administers the COVID-19 vaccine into the arm of a senior citizen at the Corona High School gymnasium in the Riverside County city of Corona, California on January 15, 2021, a day after California began offering the coronavirus vaccine to residents 65 and older. - US President-elect Joe Biden was set to announce his Covid-19 vaccine rollout plan Friday as he bids to wrest the focus from the impeachment of Donald Trump to the agenda for his first days in office.
Biden has said he wants 100 million Americans to receive shots during his first 100 days in office, an ambitious goal that would require a big step up in the current pace of distribution. (Photo by Frederic J. BROWN / AFP) (Photo by FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images)
Registered nurse Irene Musni administers the COVID-19 vaccine into the arm of a senior citizen at the Corona High School gymnasium in the Riverside County city of Corona, California on January 15, 2021, a day after California began offering the coronavirus vaccine to residents 65 and older. - US President-elect Joe Biden was set to announce his Covid-19 vaccine rollout plan Friday as he bids to wrest the focus from the impeachment of Donald Trump to the agenda for his first days in office. Biden has said he wants 100 million Americans to receive shots during his first 100 days in office, an ambitious goal that would require a big step up in the current pace of distribution. (Photo by Frederic J. BROWN / AFP) (Photo by FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images)
PHOTO: Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images
Now playing
01:55
Race to vaccinate before more contagious Covid-19 strains spread
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 22: U.S. President Joe Biden signs an executive order as Vice President Kamala Harris looks on during an event on economic crisis in the State Dining Room of the White House January 22, 2021 in Washington, DC. President Biden spoke on his administration
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 22: U.S. President Joe Biden signs an executive order as Vice President Kamala Harris looks on during an event on economic crisis in the State Dining Room of the White House January 22, 2021 in Washington, DC. President Biden spoke on his administration's response to the economic crisis that caused by the COVID-19 pandemic and signed two executive orders. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Alex Wong/Getty Images North America/Getty Images
Now playing
02:31
Biden zeroes in on the teetering economy in first week
libya russian backed mercenaries wagner investigation npw pkg intl ldn vpx_00001519.png
libya russian backed mercenaries wagner investigation npw pkg intl ldn vpx_00001519.png
Now playing
02:27
Images show huge trench being dug by Russian-backed mercenaries
Now playing
02:41
Former follower details the real danger of QAnon
A group of protesters shield themselves from chemical irritants as they demonstrate Wednesday evening, Jan. 20, 2021, outside the U.S. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement (ICE) building in Portland, Ore. (Assfault Pirates via AP)
A group of protesters shield themselves from chemical irritants as they demonstrate Wednesday evening, Jan. 20, 2021, outside the U.S. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement (ICE) building in Portland, Ore. (Assfault Pirates via AP)
PHOTO: Paul L/AP
Now playing
04:04
Portland protesters explain why they are taking to the streets
Hank Aaron, Milwaukee Braves
Hank Aaron, Milwaukee Braves' outfielder, is shown in a posed batting portrait at the Polo Grounds, Brooklyn, during the exhibition season, 1954. (AP Photo)
PHOTO: AP
Now playing
02:30
Hank Aaron, baseball legend and former home run king, dies at 86
White House senior adviser Kevin Hassett speaks with reporters at the White House, Friday, June 19, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
White House senior adviser Kevin Hassett speaks with reporters at the White House, Friday, June 19, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
PHOTO: Alex Brandon/AP
Now playing
05:08
Ex-Trump official who supports Biden stimulus plan speaks out
(CNN) —  

The city of Chicago wants $130,106.15 in the next seven days from actor Jussie Smollett, to cover the cost of the investigation into claims he was attacked in what he described to police investigators as a possible hate crime.

In a letter sent to Smollett in care of his attorneys, the city’s corporation counsel says if Smollett doesn’t pay, the city might prosecute him using Chicago’s municipal code or other legal remedies.

“The city feels this is a reasonable and legally justifiable amount to collect to help offset the costs of the investigation,” city spokesman Bill McCaffrey said.

Smollett’s defense team did not comment on the letter and referred CNN to an earlier statement, in which they said Mayor Rahm Emanuel and Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson need to apologize to their client.

“It is the Mayor and the Police Chief who owe Jussie – owe him an apology – for dragging an innocent man’s character through the mud,” the attorneys said. “Jussie has paid enough.”

In the letter, the city says two dozen police personnel worked the case, which used resources that could have been spent investigating other crimes.

The city asked for a certified cashier’s check or money order made out to “City of Chicago.”

Democratic mayor, Republican President outrages

It’s not often that Emanuel and President Donald Trump agree. But on Thursday, they were united in outrage over the dismissal of Jussie Smollett’s criminal charges.

A prosecutor unexpectedly dropped all charges Tuesday against the “Empire” actor, who was accused of staging an assault on himself – leading Chicago police to investigate it as a possible hate crime.

Emanuel lambasted a prosecutor’s decision to drop 16 charges, saying if Smollett wasn’t an actor with influence, he would have been held to a different standard.

A few hours earlier, Trump said the FBI and the Department of Justice will review the Jussie Smollett case.

“FBI & DOJ to review the outrageous Jussie Smollett case in Chicago,” Trump tweeted Thursday morning. “It is an embarrassment to our nation!”

Neither the FBI nor DOJ have commented in response to Trump’s tweet Thursday.

But one of Smollett’s attorneys, Tina Glandian, said she’s not worried about a possible federal investigation.

“We have nothing to be concerned about because … to my knowledge, nothing improper was done,” Glandian told NBC’s “Today” show Thursday.

The FBI, along with postal service inspectors, had already investigated a separate incident involving Smollett, in which a letter containing white powder was sent to Smollett at the set of “Empire.” The white powder turned out to be aspirin.

Chicago police have said they believe Smollett mailed the letter to himself, but when the letter didn’t spur the reaction he wanted, Smollett staged the attack.

How this all unfolded

Smollett, who is black and gay, told police that two men attacked him on January 29 and yelled racist and homophobic slurs while striking him, police said. Smollett said the incident ended with a noose placed around his neck and bleach poured on him, police said.

Chicago police initially investigated the case as a possible hate crime. They later said they believed the attack was staged by Smollett to bolster his profile and career.

“It’s Mr. Smollett who committed this hoax, period,” Johnson, the police superintendent, said.

Smollett faced 16 felony disorderly conduct charges. But those charges were suddenly dropped after the actor forfeited his bail money and did community service. The prosecutor, First Assistant State’s Attorney Joe Magats, said thousands of cases have similar resolutions.

The outcome prompted officials to demand an investigation or consequences against Smollett.

Republican State Rep. Michael McAuliffe announced plans Tuesday to introduce legislation this week that would prohibit any production with Smollett from receiving the Illinois Film Tax Credit.

“A lot of valuable Chicago Police Department (CPD) man hours and resources were wasted chasing down a bogus crime arranged by Smollett,” McAuliffe said. “He has cost Chicago a lot more than a $10,000 bond. Smollett should not be able to get anything more from the City of Chicago or Illinois.”

State House Republican Leader Jim Durkin has asked the Illinois attorney general’s office to “complete a thorough review of the prosecution and sentencing determination in the Smollett investigation.”

And the Chicago police union has called for a federal investigation into Cook County State’s Attorney Kim Foxx to evaluate her involvement in the case.

Foxx had recused herself from the case a week before charges were filed because of familiarity with a potential witness, a spokeswoman for her office said.

CPD said it was told not to release reports

The court’s decision to seal the records in the case angered many observers.

Chicago police released part of their investigative reports Wednesday and said there will be no more information to come.

The 61 pages were released in response to Freedom of Information Act requests from the media. They do not appear to offer many major revelations about what investigators allege was Smollett’s hoax.

They do, however, shed light on investigators’ interactions with the brothers who, investigators say, helped stage the attack.

After the documents were made public, the police department was “then advised of a court order prohibiting such release,” CPD spokesman Anthony Guglielmi tweeted.

The state’s attorney defends dropping charges …

Although the charges against Smollett were dropped, Foxx told CNN affiliate WLS that she was confident her office could have proven him guilty.

But Foxx said a guilty verdict probably wouldn’t have led to harsher consequences for the actor.

“If he’s found guilty on a Class 4 (felony), the likelihood was he was going to get some type of, perhaps, restitution, community service – not prison,” she told WLS. “And so if we can get to the same outcomes, if we get to the same measures of justice without going through the court process, we do that.”

For example, prosecutors frequently offer to drop drug possession charges if defendants agree to treatment and meetings, she said.

Foxx told WLS she understands some believe Smollett got special treatment because of his celebrity status. She said the onus was on her office to explain that resolutions like Smollett’s are also available to “someone from the neighborhood.”

… but other District Attorneys criticize the decision

In response to Smollett’s case, the National District Attorneys Association released a statement on best prosecutorial practices in high profile cases.

It said recusals of chief prosecutors should apply to the entire office; that prosecutors should not take advice from politically active friends of the accused; that alternative prosecution should include the defendant admitting culpability; and that Smollett’s record should not have been expunged immediately for the sake of transparency.

“Finally, we believe strongly that hate crimes should be prosecuted vigorously but the burden of proof should not be artificially increased due to the misguided decisions of others,” the statement said.

CNN’s Joe Sutton, Melissa Alonso, Brad Parks, Sheena Jones, Faith Karimi and Steve Almasy contributed to this report.